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Chap 2 Hardware

rOUGH DRAFT OF PRESENTATION
by

jeffrey crawford

on 4 May 2010

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Transcript of Chap 2 Hardware

Chapter 2 Hardware Tools of the Trade
Essential ESD
Bracelet
Pad
Screwdrivers
Phillips
Flathead
Tweezers
Extractor
Recovery CD
Can of compressed air
Needle nose pliers
Cleaning Pads, Q-Tips

Non-Essential Cable Ties
Flashlight
AC outlet ground tester
Network Cable tester
Loop-back plugs
Antistatic bags
Chip extractor
Diagnostic cards
Utility software
Virus detection
Diagnostic software on CD
The Tool Kit!!! Loop Back Plugs Post Diagnostic Cards Preventive Maintence Physical Protection for PCs Don’t move, jar equipment while turned on

Don’t smoke around equipment

High humidity can be dangerous to hard drives

Don’t leave equipment off for long periods of time

Don’t block air flow

Keep magnets away from computer

If private, keep under lock and key

Don’t turn on computer that has come in from cold

Disable ability to write to boot sector of hard drive
In CMOS setup
BACKUP!!!!!!!!! Document all
Setup changes
Problems
Solutions
Protect against Viruses & Attacks
Firewall
Antivirus Software
Updates Preventive Maintenance Plan Inside case
All vents clear
Compressed air to blow out dust from power supply, vents and fans
Yearly
Monthly
HARDDRIVES
Delete temporary files and empty recycle bin
Defrag the drive and scan for errors

KEYBOARDS
CLEAN THE KEYBOARD

MOUSE
CLEAN THE ROLLERS AND BALL

MONITOR
CLEAN WITH SOFT LINT FREE CLOTH

Printer
Clean out dust and bits of paper
Clean paper & ribbon paths with soft lint free cloth
Use manufacturer recommendation for other maintenance

WEEKLY
Hard drive
Regular BACKUPS
WHEN CHANGES ARE MADE
CMOS setup
Keep written records, or 3rd party software

Hard drive
(Using 3rd party software) back up the partition table to CD, Flashdrive

Written Records
All software (including version numbers) & OS installed
Hardware installed & setting
What maintenance perform
Any repairs done
Working Inside a Computer Case General Guidelines

Turn off power, do not touch when computer is on
Make notes
Stay Organized
Hold expansion cards by edges
Don’t stack boards
Don’t touch any soldered components, chips or edge of connectors unless absolutely necessary
Don’t use magnetized screwdriver
Don’t use graphite pencil to change DIP switches

Dust
Use compressed air to blow out dust from
Chassis
Power supply
Fans

Monitor and power supply consider “black boxes” They hold enough electricity to Kill even when unplugged.

Protect against static electricity

Unpacking hardware for software remove packing tape and cellophane from work area as soon as possible

Keep components away from hair and clothing

Static Electricity ESD Electrostatic discharge, static electricity
Feel =1,500
Hear=6,000
See=8,000

Takes 10 volts to damage electronic components
Catastrophic failure
Upset failure does not perform well

Prevention

Ground bracelet
Ground Mats
Static shielding bags
Antistatic gloves
PREPARING FOR SHIPPING Backup hard drive
Remove any removable disks
Turn off power
Disconnect power cords
Label anything unidentifiable
Coil all cords
Pack in original containers if possible
Purchase insurance
Disposing of Used Equipment Use manufacturers and local environmental regulations for items such as
Batteries
Printer toner cartridges
Monitors
Chemical solvent and cans

Most CRT monitors discharge if allowed to sit unplugged for 60 minutes

Physically damage all hard drives, CDs, floppy disks, DVDs, an other storage media
THE BOOT PROCESS Booting a PC
•The term boot simply means to start the computer.
•The boot can be a hard boot or a soft boot
•A hard boot or cold boot means using the on/off switch to start the PC
•A soft boot or warm boot involves using the O/S to reboot
Hard boot Vs. Soft boot •Hard boot is more stressful to your PC , power surges through your
•PC when power is turned on.
•Soft boot is less stressful to your PC, and faster because it can skip the initial start up steps of a hard boot.(start, click turn off computer, click restart)
The startup BIOS controls the beginning of the boot •There are 4 steps to the boot process

•BIOS runs the POST(power on self test)
•BIOS searches for and loads an O/S
•THE O/S configures the system and completes its own loading
•Application software is loaded.
Changing the boot sequence • BIOS looks to CMOS RAM to see which secondary storage device is holding the O/S
• The key strokes to access CMOS are displayed on the screen during stat up
• press the DEL key to enter start up or press F8 for set up)
Troubleshooting a PC problem •Interview the user to get as much information about the problem as you can
•Back up all valuable information
•Analyze the problem, begin testing , evaluating, and researching until the problem is solved.
•Once you think the problem is fixed test the fix, then document the process you used to repair the problem.
Trouble shooting a failed boot. •Is the screen blank? If it is and you can’t hear any fan or drives running or lights assume the problem has to do with the power system.
•If the screen is blank and you heard a beep then the BIOS has completed the POST successfully and you can assume the problem is with the video system
•IF you see an error message on the screen then use that to help you find the problem
Troubleshooting major subsystems used for booting. •Check electrical system
•Has BIOS communicated a problem as a beep code?
•If you hear a beep and you see a blank screen( POST has been successfully completed) you can assume the problem is with the monitor or cable
•If video and electrical systems are OK most boot problems will show as an error message
Working Inside a Computer Case Some safety precautions to follow:
Make notes that will help you backtrack
Keep screws and spacers orderly
Do not stack boards on top of each other
Do not touch the chips on circuit boards
Do not use a graphite pencil to change DIP settings
Turn off the power, unplug and ground the computer
Do not remove covers of monitors or power supplies
Keep components away from hair and clothing
Understanding the threat of
Static Electricity Build-up of charge due to absence of conductors

Electrostatic discharge (ESD)
Due to dissimilar electrical surfaces making contact

Only 10 volts of ESD can damage PC components

Walking across carpet generates up to 12,000 volts

Two types of damage: catastrophic and upset failure

Tool and methods for grounding yourself and the PC

Ground bracelet, ground mats, static shielding bags, antistatic gloves

If working inside a monitor, do not ground yourself
Steps to take a Computer Apart Essential tools:
Ground bracelet
Phillips-head screwdriver
Flat-head screwdriver, paper, and pen
Follow safety precautions at all times

1. Enter CMOS and write down customized settings
2. Power down the system, unplug all components
3. Put the computer on a good-sized table
4. Remove the cover of the PC
5. Diagram cable connections and switch settings
6. Identify cables connecting drives to motherboard
7. Remove the cables to all drives
8. Remove the expansion cards
9. Remove the motherboard (or drives)
10. Remove the power supply from the case
11. Remove each drive (if not already removed)

How to put it all back together 1. Install power supply, drives, motherboard, cards
2. Connect all data and power cables
3. Plug in the keyboard, monitor, and mouse
4. Ask instructor to check work (if in a classroom)
5. Turn on the power and check PC functions

Any Questions?
If you say no I'll give you extra candy
Full transcript