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2.What is Society? (Functionalism, Conflict, Symbolic Interaction)

Intro to Sociology. Based on openstax Introduction to Sociology 2e
by

Steph Ebert

on 3 February 2017

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Transcript of 2.What is Society? (Functionalism, Conflict, Symbolic Interaction)

What is
Society & how does it work?

Conflict Theory
Base
Symbolic Interaction
Structural Functionalism
What is Society?
family
education system
law enforcement
communal beliefs, morals & attitudes:
collective conscious.
Society is greater than the sum of its parts
Mechanical solidarity
Organic solidarity
low division of labor
strong kin-ties
tradition
same work = think the same
high division of labor
individualistic
different values can co-exist
laws formalize morals
Can feel more alienated, unless advanced enough to create new social norms.
Anomie: collective norms weak, little social/moral guidance
Durkheim
collective behavior
social integration
Dynamic equilibrium
Social facts:
laws, morals, values, religious beliefs VS
Institutions:
school, family
Manifest functions:
socialization: learning norms and values of workplace and society
Social control: respect for authority and law.
Social mobility: Social placement
Latent functions:
courtship
social networks
working in small groups
generation gap
political integration/activism
Marx
economy
Super structure
government, family religion, culture
Macro
Macro
Micro
Mead & Goffman
Capitalism
1. Private Ownership of industry (your own kisses)
2. Free competition (game)
3. Unequal economic classes (some have more kisses)
Class struggle
Worker's revolt
Complaining
Stealing, lying to get back in the game.
Socialism
Communism
Govt redistribute
No govt. needed
Marx's critique of capitalism
COMPETITION
From the product
Marx's ideas on Alienation
From the process
From others
From yourself
worker class
Wealthy (bourgeois class) own means of production
use government, laws, authority to maintain and expand
POWER
C. Wright Mills
power elite
rules of society stacked in favor of privileged few who stay on top
Class
social capital (networks & institutional relationships)
Economic capital (financial)
Cultural capital (Ways of speaking & dress)
Communication:
exchange of meaning through symbols & language is primary
way we interact with social world
we interact with things based on
meaning
ascribed to them.
social
interactions
meanings
are
interpreted
by a person when dealing with the thing in a
specific circumstance.
Social Constructions
habitualization: we do stuff, because people before us did stuff...
Thomas theorem: if we say it's real, it has real consequences
self-fulfilling prophecy (like a run on a bank)
Role: pattern of behavior
ie: it's the norms, values and behavior we expect to go along with a status (social position)
Status:
position a person occupies in a setting
Ascribed: female, old person
Achieved: student, drop out
role strain: within one role (stress of being a student)
role conflict: different roles (working student)
Role performance:
what we see
and we know we're being observed, so we think about how we are being perceived:
Impression management
Front stage vs backstage, setting matters, props reinforce impression, need shared reality (what role is everyone?) cultural "scripts"
Weber
Socioeconomic Status
master status: status that takes over
Full transcript