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Monique Rios

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on 3 November 2014

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Transcript of Monique Rios

Usually grow in shelving clusters onto logs, stumps, and branches of deciduous wood (they can grow onto live trees as well)
Spring through Fall (also winter in warm climates, or during winter warm spells in temperate areas)
Domain:
Eukarya
Kingdom:
Fungi
Phylum:
Basidiomycota
Order:
Agaricales
Family:
Mycenaceae
Genus:
Panellus
Species:
P. stipticus
How the glow is produced...
Found worldwide like in Asia, Australasia, Europe, and eastern North America.

How do Panellus stipticus produce light?
Gills are brownish which can be confused with species of Crepidotus, Crepidotus has brown spores whereas Panellus stipticus spores are white.
The greenish bioluminescence of gills can be observed if taken to a very dark room/place.
Kits are sold to make Panellus at home to see the bioluminscence glow.
Common names such as Bitter Oyster, stiptic fungus, astringent panus and Luminescent Panellus.
Its current scientific name was given in 1879, in 1783 it was scientifically described by Jean Bulliard as Agaricus stypicus.
Groups onto logs, stumps, and branches of deciduous wood.
Caps are from 1-3 cm wide.
The gills of the mushroom are bioluminescent.
Panellus Stipticus
Questions that arose
Interesting Facts
Fungi
by Monique Rios & Zaira Ramirez

Benefits to human health and environment
Panella stipticus has a tool in bioremediation because of its ability to detoxify various environmental pollutants.

Ex: They are shown to reduce the phenolic concentration of waste water produced by olive-processing plants.
The fruitbodies are reputed to have been used in traditional Chinese medicine as a hemostatic agent (stop bleeding).
Fungi Life Cycle
Is this edible?
No, Panellus Stipticus is too small and too bitter tasting to be edible. Its taste can be described as acidic, astringent, or acrid.
Nausea
Constriction in the throat.
All bioluminescence produce light by the action of luciferases, enzymes that produces light by the oxidation of a luciferin (a pigment).
This fungi serves as a very aggressive laxative for those who suffer severe chronic constipation, chronic immobility and bowel movements.
References
Phylogenetic Tree
When and where do they thrive?
wwww.academia.ed/7813992/Journal_of_Research_in_Biology_Volume_3_Issue_3

wwww.academia.ed/7813992/Journal_of_Research_in_Biology_Volume_3_Issue_3
www.messiah.edu/oakes_fungi
www.mushroomexpert.com
http://www.mykoweb.com/articles/BioluminescentFungi.html
www.patthechooks.wordpress.com
www.itsnature.org
www.everythingmushrooms.com
www.twistedsifter.com
How does it prevent bleeding?
Panellus stipticus was reportedly used externally to staunch bleeding although not much was found on the report we believe it might have been applied to the wound since it was said to be a hemostatic agent.
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