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BENGALS FOR CFA

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Rich Nolte

on 15 November 2016

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Transcript of BENGALS FOR CFA

BENGALS FOR CFA
BENGALS FOR CFA
Marianne Byrne

Rich Nolte

Rhett Bockman
BENGALS FOR CFA!
BENGAL BREED HISTORY
PATTERNS
SNOWS
BENGAL BREED STANDARD
BENGAL
REGISTRIES THAT CURRENTLY ACCEPT THE BENGAL BREED
AOV: LONGHAIRS/CASHMERE
SHOWS
AOV: OTHER COLORS
HEAD (30)
Skull…………..5
Muzzle………..6
Profile………...4
Ears…………..6
Eyes…………..6
Chin…………...3

BODY (20)
Torso:
Boning………...5
Musculature…..5
Legs/Feet……..5
Tail…………......5

COAT & COLOR (25)
Texture………..10
Coat Color…....10
Eye Color……..5

PATTERN (25)
Contrast...........………………………....10
Pattern-Specific Point Allocation……………………….............15
Rosetted/Spotted Pattern: Two Tone Markings
Marble Pattern: Two Tone Markings
Charcoal Pattern: Mask, Goggles, and Cape
Snow Pattern: Two Tone Markings

World co-ordinating body

World Cat Congress (WCC) – does not issue breed standards

International

Fédération Internationale Féline (FIFe)
The International Cat Association (TICA)
World Cat Federation (WCF)

National

American Cat Fanciers Association (ACFA)
Associazione Nazionale Felina Italiana (ANFI) - Italian member of FIFe
Emirates Feline Federation (EFF) – UAE
Felis Britannica (FB) – UK member of FIFe
Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF) – UK
Cat Aficionado Association (CAA) – China (shares the ACFA standards)
Canadian Cat Association/Association Féline Canadienne (CCA-AFC)
Southern Africa Cat Council (SACC or TSACC)
Austrailia Cat Federation (ACF)
Coordinating Cat Council of Austrailia (CCCA)
New Zealand Cat Fancy (NZCF)



BENGALS AND THEIR TRAINERS
SOCIAL MEDIA & THE BENGAL
WHO IS BENGALS FOR CFA?
A group of 2,900+ Bengal enthusiast (and growing)
founded on Facebook in March 2014.
HEAD: Broad, modified wedge with rounded contours, longer than wide, with high cheekbones. Slightly small in proportion to body, not to be taken to extreme. Top of skull flows back into the neck, with visible back skull. No flat planes. Allowance for jowls on mature males.

PROFILE: Gently curved forehead to nose bridge, nose may have a slight concave curve.

NOSE: Large and wide, slightly puffed nose leather. Bridge of nose extends above the eyes.

CHIN: Strong, substantial, aligns with tip of nose in profile.

MUZZLE: Full and broad, with prominent whisker pads.

EARS: Medium to small, with a wide base, rounded tips being desirable. Set far apart, following the contours of the face in frontal view. Slight tilt forward in profile view. Light, horizontal furnishings acceptable, tufts are undesirable.


The earliest mention of an Asian Leopard Cat/domestic cross was in 1889, when Harrison Weir wrote of them in Our Cats and All About Them.
The earliest mention of a confirmed ALC/domestic cross was in 1934 in a Belgian scientific journal, and in 1941, a Japanese cat publication printed an article about one that was kept as a pet.
Jean ( Sugden ) Mill, the person who was later a great influence on the development of the modern Bengal breed, submitted a term paper for her genetics class at UC Davis on the subject of crossbreeding cats in 1946.
In the 1970s, Dr. William Centerwall bred ALCs with domestic cats to aid his studies in genetics because of the ALC's immunity to feline leukemia. Eventually, these hybrids were given to Jean Sudgen Mill because of Centerwall's illness.
At the same time, Bill Engler wanted to preserve the exotic cats' genes by breeding them with house cats. However, none of today's Bengal lines originate from these cats. He chose the name "bengal," which was accepted by the ACFA.
Jean Mill was instrumental in recognition of Bengals as a breed by TICA in 1983. Her plan was not to keep the breed as a hybrid, but to domesticate these cats by breeding them further with each other, and not to continue breeding to the ALC.
BENGAL: GENERAL DESCRIPTION
The Bengal is a medium to large cat with a sleek, muscular build. Boning is substantial. Rear legs are slightly taller than front. The tail is thick, with a rounded tip, and carried lower than the back. The Bengal's head, expressive noctural look, and stunning markings give the breed a wild appearance. With a coat that is like no other: it is short, close lying, soft, silky to the touch, luxurious, and ideally glittered. Bengals are alert and active, highly intelligent, with inquisitve dependable dispositions. Males are generally larger than females.
POINT SCORE
PAW PRINT ROSETTES
PANCAKE/DONUT ROSETTES
"CLOUDED" ROSETTES
MARBLE PATTERN
OPEN MARBLES
SHEETED MARBLES
MODERATE MARBLES
CHARCOAL PATTERN
SMOKE PATTERN
MELANISTIC/SOLID PATTERN
UC DAVIS TESTS
ARROW HEAD ROSETTES
"Charcoal Pattern - Bengal Cat

The Bengal cat breed consists of hybrid animals originally developed from crosses between the domestic cat (Felis sylvestris catus) and the Asian Leopard Cat (ALC) (Prionailurus bengalensis). Although the original intention was to replicate the exotic spotted ALC coat in domestic cats, some hybrids sport an unusual coat marking of a darker face mask and dark thick dorsal stripe (cape). This pattern has generated great interest among Bengal enthusiasts. Terra Sinclair, a Bengal Cat breeder, postulated from breeding outcomes that the “charcoal” pattern was produced by the combination of a domestic cat non-agouti allele (a) and an ALC agouti allele (APb), thus conferring the darker markings on their coat pattern. Research by Drs. Liza Gershony and Leslie Lyons has confirmed this mode of inheritance of the pattern. The VGL offers a test that helps breeders/owners determine the Charcoal status and breeding potential of their cats."

https://www.vgl.ucdavis.edu/services/coatcolorcat.php
ACCORDING TO UC DAVIS
CHARCOAL BENGALS
Prominent white goggles, and mask.
CHARCOALS AT SHOWS
ROSETTED/SPOTTED TABBY PATTERN
MELANISTIC PATTERN
SMOKE PATTERN
MARBLE TABBY PATTERN
REGISTRATION NUMBERS
The charcoal cape can be seen down the spine.
SPOTTED PATTERN
Allowance for spotted pattern, rosettes are preferred.
SEAL LYNX POINT - MINK - SEAL SEPIA
SEAL LYNX POINT
MINK
SEAL SEPIA
EYES: Shape is round to oval. Large, but not bugged. Set wide apart, with a slight bias toward the base of ear when oval in shape. Eye color independent of coat color, except in the Lynx Points, where Blue is the only acceptable color. Richness and depth of color is always preferred.

NECK: Thick and muscular, long in proportion to the body.

BODY: Long and substantial, muscular, particularly the males. Hindquarters slightly higher than shoulders.

BONE: Substantial, never delicate.

LEGS: Medium long, slightly longer rear legs, muscular.

PAWS: Large and round, with prominent knuckles.

TAIL: Thick, tapered at the end with rounded tip. Medium in length, in proportion to body.

COAT: With qualities unique to the breed, the Bengal coat is short, close lying, soft, silky, luxurious, and ideally glittered. The Cashmere is the exception, being the Longhaired Bengal(AOV).
YOUNG EXHIBITORS
BENGAL HEALTH


The Bengal is generally a healthy cat. There are no diseases specific to the breed and they have no health problems related to their conformation. Their susceptibility to infectious diseases is comparable to other domestic breeds. Their vaccination requirements are exactly the same as other breeds. One anatomical condition that breeders and buyers need to be aware of is Flat Chested Kitten Syndrome (FCKS). FCKS is a multifactorial condition which develops in kittens a few days after birth. It is caused by abnormal development of the rib cage resulting in a flattened angular appearance. Although death from heart/respiratory failure can occur, affected kittens often survive and grow out of the condition to lead normal lives as pets but should never be used for breeding. Genetic and dietary factors are thought to be involved.

http://www.gccfcats.org/Cat-Breeds/Bengal
BENGAL APPLICATION : ACTIVE BREEDERS
Currently Available for Bengals
Bengal Progressive Retinal Atrophy
(PRA-b)

Coat Colors (including the charcoal pattern)

PK Deficiency (Erythrocyte Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency)
DOLLARS MAKE SENSE for CFA
2013 - 7,313 Bengals x $17 = $124,321

2014 - 8,019 Bengals x $17 = $136,323

2015 - 8,221 Bengals x $17 = $139,757
Over 5,000 litters registered last year...
5,000 x $12 = $60,000
AOV - PATTERNS
SMOKE
SOLID (MELANISTIC)
Rosettes and spots shall be random, with a horizontal flow to their alignment, and a pattern like no other breed. Ground color should be clear, and free of ticking. Contrast with ground color must be extreme, showing distinct pattern with sharp edges. Rosettes are two toned, with dark outlines, and a lighter center. Rosettes can be many different shapes, such as round donut, open donut, pancake, paw print, arrowhead, or clustered, and are preferred to single spotting. Strong, bold chin strap and mascara markings desirable. Backs of ears have a thumbprint. Color on chest and belly should be lighter than ground color. Blotchy horizontal shoulder streaks, spotted legs, and spotted, or rosetted tail are desirable. Belly must be spotted. Allowance for spotted pattern without rosettes. These cats are not required to have two tone markings.
The Marble pattern is full of swirls, with a pattern like no other breed. Ground color should be clear, and free of ticking. Contrast with ground color must be extreme, showing distinct markings with sharp edges. Markings are two toned, having a horizontal or diagonal flow. Side pattern symmetry not required. There should be no resemblance to the Classic Tabby pattern, and a circular pattern or bullseye is undesirable. The more random the pattern, the better. Additional color tones inside the pattern, giving a “stained glass” effect is desirable. Patterned shoulder markings, and multi-toned markings on legs and tail desirable. Rosettes and spots can be present, particularly on the legs. Strong chin strap, mascara markings desirable. Backs of ears have a thumbprint. Color on chest and belly should be lighter than ground color. Belly must be patterned. Allow for maturity for “stained glass” or full coloration to appear.
SNOW TABBY PATTERN
Similar to the snow leopard, the snow Bengal has a lighter, pattern. Rosettes and spots should be random, with a horizontal flow to their alignment. There are three main patterns: Lynx Point, Mink Tabby, and Sepia Tabby, in Seal or Blue, with or without the addition of the Silver color. The Snows can be Rosetted/Spotted, Marble, or Charcoal. Influence of the Charcoal Pattern on the Snow Patterns result in ground color that is shades darker than the individual color descriptions of the Snow Patterns with color on chest and belly being lighter than ground color. Markings will show good contrast, with a dark cape running down the back, equal in color to the darkest markings. There must be white, or nearly white “goggles” encircling the eyes. A dark mask runs all the way from the nose bridge to the nose, and connects from the mascara lines, all the way to the nose bridge. A wide, dark, “cape” running down the length of the back is desirable.
The smoke Bengal has ghost tabby markings, which have a horizontal flow to their alignment. All colors of Smoke have a whitish undercoat. Smokes can be Rosetted/Spotted, Marble, or Snow.
The term “Melanistic”, when describing a hybrid cat, is a Solid, but not in the sense of a Solid in a non-hybrid breed. In the Bengal cat, the Melanistic shows ghost tabby markings. They can be either Rosetted/Spotted, Marble or Snow. The Pattern is more visible in kittens. As adults, most appear more solid in color.
CHARCOAL TABBY PATTERN
There should be definite contrast between ground color and markings, with distinct shapes, and clearly defined edges. Pattern should have a horizontal flow. Preference will be given to very dark markings, with clear outlines, and well contrasted to the ground color. There must be white, or nearly white spectacles or “goggles” encircling the eyes. A dark mask runs all the way from the nose bridge to the nose, and connects from the mascara lines all the way to the nose bridge. A wide, dark, “cape” running down the length of the back is desirable. Color on chest and belly should be lighter than ground color. Kittens are sometimes rosetted, adults are usually spotted. Charcoals can be Spotted, or Marble Pattern.
AOV: LONGHAIR/CASHMERE DESCRIPTION
The Longhair Bengal can come in any described color/pattern combination. Coat is semi long haired, with a fine texture, and luxurious, not cottony or wooly. The coat should create an all over harmonious impression with the longer parts flowing gently into the shorter ones. Long hair sticking out on any part of the body is undesirable. Coat shall lay close to the body. Silky coat and satin glitter are desirable, but not required. Pattern shall be clearly visible, with a horizontal flow to its alignment. Hair around head and neck may be slightly longer. A slightly fuller coat on the back of neck is accepted, but not required. A corona of hair around the head, extremely thick, full coat on back of neck, or a ruff, is undesirable. Ears shall not be tufted, but slight ear tips are allowed. Strong ear tufts, spoiling the rounded impression of the ear are not desirable. Tail shall be slightly longer haired creating a plumed impression.


LILAC, CHOCOLATE, CINNAMON, & FAWN
Social media puts the Bengal breed at the world's finger tips. Bengal Breeders have direct access to millions of future owners, current owners, and fans of the breed. Posting show wins, litter announcements, and available kittens takes a matter of minutes.

The future of the CAT FANCY is social media. The CAT WORLD must adjust to modern times, and communicate openly and freely with the NEXT GENERATION of breeders, owners, and campaigners.
CANADA
USA
AUSTRALIA
KOREA
U.K.
FRANCE
MALAYSIA
SINGAPORE
NEW CLUBS!

NEW BREEDERS & EXHIBITORS!

MORE REVENUE!

THE WORLDS ONLY ROSETTED BREED!

NEXT GENERATION of THE CAT FANCY!

THE TIME IS NOW, THE STUNNING DOMESTIC BENGAL IS READY FOR CFA!
THE BENGAL MIMICS NO OTHER CFA BREED
NEW VISION CAT CLUB
CFA BENGAL REGISTRATION
1.1 MILLION LIKES!
There are a few hereditary diseases which breeders and buyers need to be aware of. None of these are specific to the Bengal. Pyruvate kinase deficiency which causes chronic anemia is caused by a defect in an autosomal recessive gene. A commercial DNA test is now available. Although the incidence of affected (homozygous) Bengals has been found to be extremely low breeders are advised to test breeding cats so that matings between carriers can be avoided. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is a hereditary disease caused by a defect in an autosomal dominant gene that affects many species including man. It is the most common heart disease in cats including non-pedigrees and does occur in some Bengal lines. The disease shows a highly variable clinical course; in severe cases death from heart failure can occur but many cats with mild HCM never show clinical disease and have a normal life span. Unfortunately no commercial DNA test is available in the Bengal. Screening of breeding cats by echocardiography is recommended and affected cats should be removed from the breeding program. A rare eye disease called Progressive Retinal Atrophy has been reported in Bengals in the USA but is not thought to occur in the UK. A DNA test for this condition is now available in the Bengal.

http://www.gccfcats.org/Cat-Breeds/Bengal
BROWN
SILVER
SNOW
BLUE
CHARCOAL
https://www.vgl.ucdavis.edu/services/cat/
SHOWS
We propose that CFA will require a 5 generation Certified Pedigree, containing ONLY Bengals, to be eligible for registration, and exhibition at CFA shows.

NO ASIAN LEOPARD CATS, and NO OUTCROSSES allowed in the 5 generation
Certified Pedigree.

We propose that all Bengal cats must be CFA registered to enter a show hall, and all
Bengal kittens must be CFA litter registered.
CHARCOAL
SNOW
ROSETTED/SPOTTED
MARBLE
PATTERNS
ITALY
GERMANY
President - Marianne Byrne

Vice President - Rich Nolte

Secretary - Melody Boyd

Treasurer - James Michael Lubbad
CFA's 1st Bengal Breed Cat Club
Full transcript