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(REVISED) Poetry Launching Writer's Notebook English 10

Pilot program for 10th grade poetry notebook
by

Richard Kreinbring

on 19 October 2016

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Transcript of (REVISED) Poetry Launching Writer's Notebook English 10



How did you get the artifact?
Is there a story behind it?
Why do you keep it?
What does it represent to you now, after time has passed?
What would your mother, father, or friend say about this item?
What do you think about when you think about this artifact?
What emotions does the artifact make you feel?

This first try at the prompt you do not have to write in the shape of a poem.
You can write it across the page like free-writing or you can shape the entry like a poem.





Make a list or free write
about where and whom you come from.

(4 Minutes)

People
Places
Time period
Geographical Regions
Events
Ideas
Foods
Smells
Legends/Stories
Religion
Holiday Traditions
Phrases/Words of Wisdom
Rules
Legacies
Directions for the first attempt:
Repeat the Prompt to Create an Unrelated List
Get Started.
Use the prompt to get started. Write until you run out of words.
Insert the prompt again
and write in another direction.
Change the topic or the emotions you are writing about.
Try to create 3-4 new starts by
repeating the prompt 3-4 times
.
Start again.
Skip a line, write the prompt again; write about whatever comes into your head.
You can shift subject or stay on the subject you just discovered in your first dash at writing.
Write fast without a plan a second time until you run out of words.
Things you should not worry about:

Do not worry about connecting the sections.
Do not worry about changing ideas or topics.
Do not worry about a pattern. You are just using the prompt to get memories, feelings, observations, or thoughts on the page.
ATTEMPT #1
Free Write
Teaching Point:

Preparation: Form small groups (3 or 4 students) who will take turns reading and responding to notebook entries.

Listeners will tell the writer what they found most memorable about their entries and make non-judgmental statements using the following sentence starters:



Write an Artifact Poem [15-20 Lines]

Strategy:
Use your free write to find phrases for your poem

Yo Where I'm from
I Apologize
Now that you have a few entries in your notebook it is time to get some feedback and conduct a few experiments.

Get in your peer review groups. Take turns reading entries to the group.

Listeners will tell the writer what they found most memorable about their entries and make non-judgmental statements using the following sentence starters:
I noticed…
The line that sticks out for me is…
The part I remember best is…
I felt…when this happened in the story…
I wish I knew more about…
I wonder…
This part in the story reminded me of…

The writer will take notes on the nonjudgmental feedback in his/her notebooks
"A poem begins as a lump in the throat, a sense of wrong, a homesickness, a lovesickness."
Robert Frost


"A poem can have an impact, but you can't expect an audience to understand all the nuances."
Douglas Dunn


"A poem is never finished only abandoned."
Paul Valery


"A poem is true if it hangs together. Information points to something else. A poem points to nothing but itself."
E. M. Forster
MID UNIT METACOG
Pick 2 of the following:

Describe how it felt to have a group of readers respond to your writing?

Describe what the group noticed in your writing. Was it what you wanted to have happen?

How did the responses from the group help you see your own writing in a new way?
Discuss what you learned from responding to your classmates writing.
Start with this question.
then
Pick the poem that defines you
or line you wish you had written
Turn-and-Talk to the person next to you:
Read your poem aloud
Explain
WHY
that poem defines you
Invitation:
Create an Autobiographical poem
using the first line of the poem that defines you.
Length: 25-45 lines in your Writer's Notebook

Talk with a little luck in it, that's what poetry is-- just let the words take you where you want to go. You'll be invited; things will happen; your life will have more in it than other
people's lives have.
---William Stafford
Habit:
Poets fall in love with words. They can find poems by playing with and experimenting with the words they love.
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,


And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I--
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference
The Road Not Taken- Robert Frost
What Words Do You Love?
Create a list of 10 words you love in your Writer's Notebook
Please be school appropriate!
Please respond the to the prompt on a new page in your Writer's Notebook
Jabberwocky
by Lewis Carroll


'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

"Beware the Jabberwock, my son
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"

He took his vorpal sword in hand;
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

"And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"
He chortled in his joy.

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.
Invitation:
Textbook Found Poem

1. Using a textbook, create found poem of 12-15 lines.
2. DO NOT cut anything out of your textbook, of course!
3. Write the lines you like from your textbook on a page of your WNB.
4. When you feel you have enough words and phrases, begin to shape the poem. You may add your own words to this poem; put a box around any words/phrases that come directly from the textbook.
"I think of myself as focusing a camera lens as I write, always striving to make the picture
clearer, sharper, more detailed." ---Martin Espada


Please respond to the quote in your WNB. You have 5 minutes to write.

Finding Poems through Observation

"I think of myself as focusing a camera lens as I write, always striving to make the picture clearer, sharper, more detailed." - Martin Espada
Habit:
Poets
observe the world
and write about the small daily events and the stories that suggest ideas and stories.

Poets
use detailed descriptions (IMAGERY) and figurative language
to capture their observations.

Craft Decision:
Poets make line
break and stanza break
decisions with intent.
Mini Task
Find that picture you brought with your artifact. If you don't still have it, look at this one.

1. Write seven sentences that describe the picture using sensory detail, simile, or metaphor.
Read your poem experiment to a partner. Share details that you can picture in your mind.
Sit-on-a-Bench Poem
15-20 lines
Go for a walk with your WNB. Notice people, animals, plants, places as you walk. When you find a spot you like, stop and write 3-6 sentences describing it. You can make the sentences a list. When you're done, write about the walk, a memory, anything that pops into your head. Shape this like a poem.
EXIT SLIP
Answer the following questions:
1. What reaction did you try to create for your reader?
2. What observation details do you include to create the reaction?
3. What reaction did your partner have? What details did he/she share that instigated that reaction?
4. What strength would you recognize? And/or what changes would you make now that you have heard a reader's reaction to your writing?
The poet's notebook becomes a rich resource. Rereading it allows a poet to discover the topics, themes, structures and techniques they tried and tend to return to again and again.
This rereading work is the first step in planning a project and finding the poems that are ready for revision and the publication process.
Read your WNB.
Stop when you arrive at a freewrite, experiment, or poem draft that you are interested in revising and publishing.
Write yourself a note explaining why you want to rethink and revise this entry.
“I cannot say too many times
how powerful the
techniques of
line length and line breaks are.

You cannot swing the lines
around, or fling strong sounding
words, or scatter soft
ones, to no purpose.”
~Mary Oliver
Notice the ways you are connected to your entries: topic, theme, structure, line breaks or shape, poetry decisions/techniques.
Foul Shot

With two 60s stuck on the scoreboard
And two seconds hanging on the clock,
The solemn boy in the center of eyes,
Squeezed by silence,
Seeks out the line with his feet,
Soothes his hands along his uniform,
Gently drums the ball against the floor,
Then measures the waiting net,
Raises the ball on his right hand,
Balances it with his left,
Calms it with fingertips,
Breathes,
Crouches,
Waits,
And then through a stretching of stillness,
Nudges it upward.

The ball
Slides up and out,
Lands,
Leans,
Wobbles,
Wavers,
Hesitates,
Exasperates,
Plays it coy
Until every face begs with unsounding screams—
And then
And then
And then,
Right before ROAR-UP,
Dives down and through.
~Edwin A. Hoey
The Boy
His room was at the end of the hall, farthest from the nurses’ station. He had cancer or a bad heart. We played crazy eights in the afternoon, always in his room. He couldn't get up; he was attached to machines. I noticed his skinny ankles, his feet bare and chapped. I imagined us on the outside: riding skateboards and getting matching haircuts.

Where would you put line breaks? Why?
Write this paragraph in poetic form
in your WNB.
BASIC LINE BREAK DECISIONS


1. Complete sentence or complete phrase on a line

2. Length (same length, varied length, sudden change in length)

3. Last Word (nouns or verbs or syllables)

4. First Word (pattern or litany)

5. Punctuation (slows or speeds the poem’s pace)


On the page provided, list which poems fit into the corresponding category. Explain why you like this particular poem and how it demonstrates the category you selected.
Label your bookmarks with the following:
topic, theme, structure, line breaks or shape, poetry decisions/techniques
. Remember a single poem can have more than one of these.
Session 8.2
Line Breaks
We Real Cool

THE POOL PLAYERS.
SEVEN AT THE GOLDEN SHOVEL.

We real cool. We
Left school. We

Lurk late. We
Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We
Thin gin. We

Jazz June. We
Die soon.

--Gwendolyn Brooks
A New Poet

Finding a new poet
is like finding a new wildflower
out in the woods. You don't see

its name in the flower books, and
nobody you tell believes
in its odd color or the way

its leaves grow in splayed rows
down the whole length of the page. In fact
the very page smells of spilled

red wine and the mustiness of the sea
on a foggy day - the odor of truth
and of lying.

And the words are so familiar,
so strangely new, words
you almost wrote yourself, if only

in your dreams there had been a pencil
or a pen or even a paintbrush,
if only there had been a flower.

--Linda Pastan
Select a poem in your WNB and redraft it twice using the line break decisions that emphasizes a
pattern
. Read it aloud and decide which draft you prefer.
Ways that You Can Use Line Breaks to Create a Pattern
and
Break a Pattern to Create Emphasis
**Create a Pattern
Complete sentences or phrases on a line
Use complete phrases or complete sentences on a line. This creates control over the subject that gives whatever the poet is talking about power.
Break the Pattern: Break a phrase, putting part on one line and part on the next line.
Add emphasis to the first word on the next line by breaking the phrase with a preposition (of, by, in, through); an article (the, a, an) or a conjunction (and, but, so, for).
Add surprise by finding an unexpected word as the first word of the next line.
**One syllable words at the end of the line
This control is stronger if the poet uses more one syllable words at the the end of the line.
Break the Pattern: Use two or three syllable words.
A three-syllable word in this line break pattern will stick out because it breaks the pattern and also have more emphasis.
**Consistent number of lines in a stanza
Break the Pattern: Inconsistent number of lines in stanzas.
Add breaking a phrase at a stanza break, and you make the reader read faster and emphasize emotions
I apologize by Oscar Brown Jr.

I apologize for being black
All I am plus all I lack
Please sir, please m’am
Give me some slack
‘Cause I apologize

I apologize for being poor
For being sick and tired and sore
Since I ain’t slick
Don’t know the score
I do apologize

I apologize because I bear
Resemblance most black people share
Thick lips, flat nose, and nappy hair
Yes I apologize

I apologize for how I look
For all of the lows and blows I took
On those Lord knows I’d close the book
As I apologize

I apologize for all I gave
For letting you make me yo’ slave
And going to my early grave
Yes I apologize

I apologize for being caught
For being sold, for being bought
For being told I count for naught
Yeah I apologize

I apologize for all I’ve done
For all my toil out in the sun
Don’t want to spoil your righteous fun
So I apologize

I apologize and curse my kind
For being fooled, for being blind
For being ruled, and in your bind
Yes I apologize

I apologize and curse my feet
For being slow, for being late
Because I know it’s me you hate
Why not apologize

I apologize and tip my hat
‘Cause you so rich and free and fat
Son of a bitch, that’s where it’s at
And I apologize
Line Breaks to Emphasize Words or Phrases
These Poems Use Line Breaks to Establish a Pattern
Identify what that Pattern is
ee cummings sets a pattern, then breaks it.
ee cummings
when serpents bargain for the right to squirm
and the sun strikes to gain a living wage-
when thorns regard their roses with alarm
and rainbows are insured against old age

when every thrush may sing no new moon in
if all screech-owls have not okayed his voice
-and any wave signs on the dotted line
or else an ocean is compelled to close

when the oak begs permission of the birch
to make an acorn-valleys accuse their
mountains of having altitude-and march
denounces april as a saboteur

then we'll believe in that incredible
unanimal mankind(and not until)
http://www.favoritepoem.org/videos.html
Poetry Experiments
How-To
1. Select the poems with which you would
like to experiment.
2. Type the poems and print them.
3. Select the experiments to conduct on your poems (see the Experiments Packet for all 13 options). Highly recommended to give you the most “bang for your buck” are #5, #7, and
#10.


4. Conduct the experiments on the printed copies of the poems. Mark up the original draft, and then write the second draft directly on the paper. This shows your work (it’s not just for math, after all!). I want to see your process and your decision-making.
Finally...
5. Decide which draft of the poem you like best. In a brief artist’s statement, explain the experiments you conducted, and why you selected the draft of choice as the best version of the poem. You may write this on the copy of the typed poem. *Do this for each poem with which you experimented.
Requirements
•Choose three poems
•Conduct two experiments on each poem.
•That’s a total of SIX revisions.
•Be sure to write your favorite version of the poems (if not your original drafts) in your WNB—or type them up and glue them in.
Today #10 on two Poems
assign Finish #10 do #7 once due tomorrow
Wed:
Look at #7 Turn and talk Do #7 again diff poem
Do #5 in Class Finish at home one in class one at home

Thur Lab
Type up final versions of all experiments.
Put in folder

Friday- Explain Publish looks like-Share/talk edit more
Poem 1 I did #5 and 10= 3 poems
This three-year-old can recite poetry. So can you.

Listen to his recitations; what strategies and techniques do you hear in the poems?
What's Due Today?
Good Question.

You need to type up the results of your experiments.

3 experiments (5,7,10) each done twice=6 poems.
Out of that 6 there will be 3 final drafts. These are the results of the experiments that you like best.
These drafts will have an "Artist Statement" typed at the end of the poem.

Wait, what's and artist's statement?

Good Question.

An artist's statement is where you explain the experiments you conducted, and why you selected the draft of choice as the best version of the poem. What was your aim with this poem and why does it achieve that aim.
Mini-Task: Session 9
1. Pass out copies of your poem to all group members. You each should have a copy.
2. Identify a time keeper. Every writer gets an equal amount of time for response (8 minutes)
3. Identify a first writer/reader.
4. First writer/reader reads entry (1 minute) and remains SILENT during response acting like an evesdropper. READER TAKES NOTES.
5. Response group members engage in conversation about the poem using the response group responses. Group members do not talk to or ask questions of the writer/reader. Members point out lines and details, name the devices, and explain how they understand the poem. They agree and disagree trying to make sense of the poem. They spend more time noticing and explaining (4 minutes); they spend less time stating confusions, imagining and wondering about changes (3minutes).
6. Writer/Reader closes the time by saying thank you. The writer/reader does not explain the poem or ask questions. Students may ask questions or have additional conversations about their writing after the group finishes all writers.
Reflection: What did you learn about your poem or the decisions you used to create it as you listened to your response group and took notes? What is one strength in your writing? What changes might you make?

Homework:
Show a poem to two people (One has to be an adult) outside of the 10th grade and ask them to react to it by writing on the copy you gave them.
Bring in the marked copies on Tuesday
Feedback and Revision

Poets engage in response groups with readers, writers and friends to gain insight into their own writing.
While this conversation is going on the poet is to take note on the notecard-you have to show me this to get credit for the session. Fill both side with ideas/plans/revisions/explainations/reactions...

Switch Poets and repeat the process.
Poet
Distribute your poem.
Take a notecard.

Read your poem to the group.

Listen and take notes.
Group:
Listen and read along-make any notes on your copy of the poem.
Talk to the other group members-not the poet-about the poem.
In groups 3-4


Each copy must have the following
Publication Packet:
Artist Statement typed at the top of the poem.
Final Copy of the Poem
Metacognative Reflection typed at the bottom of the poem. Remember this is the most important part of the process. I won't grade the quality of your poem but I will grade the quality of your response.
Copies of earlier drafts and experiments.
I must be able to trace the evolution of this poem from idea to final copy. You must be able to discuss the process you followed to produce it.
Poem for Display
Get creative with this copy. It's going on the wall. Your best poem, illustrated, decorated, annotated any appropriate way you see fit.
Due Friday
PEER REVIEW GROUP
The Lanyard by Billy Collins
The other day I was ricocheting slowly off the blue walls of this room,moving as if underwater from typewriter to piano,from bookshelf to an envelope lying on the floor,when I found myself in the L section of the dictionary where my eyes fell upon the word lanyard.
No cookie nibbled by a French novelist could send one into the past more suddenly—a past where I sat at a workbench at a camp by a deep Adirondack lake learning how to braid long thin plastic strips into a lanyard, a gift for my mother.
I had never seen anyone use a lanyard or wear one, if that’s what you did with them,but that did not keep me from crossing strand over strand again and again until I had made a boxy red and white lanyard for my mother.
She gave me life and milk from her breasts,and I gave her a lanyard.She nursed me in many a sick room,lifted spoons of medicine to my lips,laid cold face-cloths on my forehead,and then led me out into the airy light
and taught me to walk and swim,and I, in turn, presented her with a lanyard.Here are thousands of meals, she said,and here is clothing and a good education.And here is your lanyard, I replied,which I made with a little help from a counselor.
Here is a breathing body and a beating heart,strong legs, bones and teeth,and two clear eyes to read the world, she whispered,and here, I said, is the lanyard I made at camp.And here, I wish to say to her now,is a smaller gift—not the worn truth
that you can never repay your mother,but the rueful admission that when she tookthe two-tone lanyard from my hand,I was as sure as a boy could bethat this useless, worthless thing I wove out of boredom would be enough to make us even.
I'm Thinking About You
Hands
Here are some examples of litany poems. They all happen to be awesome slam poems, too.

Listen for the repeated line.
Turn-and-Talk-
Share your words with a partner

On Friday you'll show me a stack of poems.
The one on top is your favorite and should be heavily highlighted.
The next 4 or so are the ones you really liked.
The rest are good poems but for whatever reason didn't move you.
Habit:
Poets and Writers collect works.
You will create a collection of 10 poems.
Read the poems you picked and underline or highlight at least a couple of "borrowable" lines from each one.
Pick 5 poems you really like. The lines you liked from these poems you need to write in to your WNB. Make sure you give credit by noting the poet's name and the poem's title.
Out of these 5 pick your favorite. The one you wish you wrote and copy the full thing into your WNB.
You are to do all of the following:
Sensory Poems
2. Share with a partner. Why does this picture matter to you? Point out details.
3.Write a close description or a story using details from your observation.
Now Shape it like a poem. Start with a specific detail.
White Elephant Poetry Exchange Rules
1. Choose the poem from your collection that you like least--- put in on the "gift table" face down.

2. Each Player Draws a Number

3. The Player Who Drew #1 Selects a Poem.
* The player must READ THE POEM ALOUD before
returning to his/her seat
* If the poem is LONG, just read a stanza or two

4. The Player Who Drew #2 Selects a poem or Takes Player #1's poem, And So On... You must make the decision BEFORE you see the unknown poem from the gift table.

*Starting with Player #2, each player then has
the option to select an already-chosen poem
from another player, or to select a
unchosen poem from the gift table.

*If the player selects another player's poem,
the player who is now without a poem has two
options. 1) He can take another player's
poem, or 2) He can select an unclaimed poem
from the gift table

5. The game is over when the last player has chosen a poem.

Special Rules for White Elephant

The third time a single player steals the same poem, that poem is permanently his. That means it cannot be stolen by anyone else, and the player and his poem retires from the game. This means it must be in the possession of that same player 3 times, not just that the poem has to be stolen 3 times by any player.

A player cannot steal back a poem that has been stolen from him during the same turn. So for instance, if someone steals your "The Road Not Taken" poem, you can't take it right back. You must wait for another turn. If someone then steals your poem on his turn, you can take back that "The Road Not Taken" poem you've been waiting all your life for.
Now That You Have a Poem from the White Elephant...
Find the worst poem in your collection.
Highlight the worst 4 lines of that poem.
Use one of the "bad lines" from the poem you got stuck with.
Use that line as the first line and write a new 10-15 line poem.
***Apply one of the techniques we discuss in today's lesson***
The Children of Children
Line Breaks to Emphasize Words

The last word on the line has power.
It is the most important word on the line. Therefore, most poets use nouns and verbs (specific words: carnation, not flower; Mustang, not car.

One word on a line has even more emphasis
and power.

Lines that are
shorter than others
have more emphasis.

Repetition adds emphasis
Often poets use the repeated word at the beginning of the line (as in litany poems).

However, poets bury the repeated word or change the placement of the words.

Select a poem from your WNB
Redraft it twice, using line break decisions that
emphasize words.

Try the decisions one way and then re-draft the poem trying the line breaks a different way.
You should have two different versions of the same poem when you're finished.
Turn & Talk (3 minutes)
Share your poem and explain your line break choices.
Sign in to your google docs drive.
You should have already created a collection that says "English 10 and your name. If not then do that now.
Share the folder with me by clicking on "share."
Use this email to share with me:
richard.kreinbring@avondaleschools.org
Now create another collection called Your Last Name Poetry Notebook.
Put that collection into the English 10 Folder and you've shared it with me.
Put all of your poems and experiments into this folder.
When you're ready to submit your notebook for grading do this:
In your poetry notebook collection on googkle docs create two new folders.
Label the first one "Drafts and Your Last Name"
Label the second one "Final Copies and your last name"
Put the poems you want me to grade in the "Final Copies" Folder.
Today
Finish Final copies of the poems you want to submit for publication and grading.
Welcome Back!
Writing Prompt:
What is your mission?
Write one-two sentences in your WNB and be ready to share tomorrow.


In Your WNB (8 minutes)
Free write about your artifact
Try to fill an entire page
Use the questions below to get started
and to keep going
Turn & Talk (5 minutes)
Read each other's writing about the artifact.
Use those phrases to start your conversations.
This is how we talk to each other about our writing. Use phrases like these:

I noticed…
The line that sticks out for me is…
The part I remember best is…
I felt…when this happened in the story…
I wish I knew more about…
I wonder…
This part in the story reminded me of…


Habit:
We use non-judgmental responses so all writers feel free to take risks
and feel comfortable exposing stories that matter in their poetry.

Take out your artifact or the picture of the artifact
Tell your "Turn & Talk" partner about it
Here's what that can look like,
when done by a professional slam poet.

Now it's our turn. Let's take a look at the "Where I'm From" poem.
Glue it now if you haven't yet.

We're going to try it two ways.
Keep this in mind:

You are just using the prompt to get memories, feelings,
observations, or thoughts on the page!
Do not worry about connecting the sections
Do not worry about changing ideas or topics
Do not worry about a pattern
Repeat the prompt "I come from" when you get stuck
Brilliant.
We just got a solid start on a poem.
Now let's try writing a second poem on the same topic in a different way.
Invitation:
Create your own Repeated Phrase
Write a "litany" Poem.
(30-45 Lines)
These are like "I come from" poems. They just use a different repeated phrase.
Litany Poems
Our turn.
Talk to a partner and come up with a
list of 10
or more phrases you might use in this kind of poem. (4 minutes)

We're too good to use the obvious ones,
so let's not use:
I love...
I like...
I hate...
I am...
I remember...
I'm sorry...


Shape and Tape
1. Cut words and phrases from a print source. Take some time to arrange these on your desk— manipulate the words until you see a poem take shape.

2. Do not add any of your own words! Only chopped words and phrases are allowed.

3. When you are happy with the poem you have created, tape it or glue it in your WNB or a piece of copy paper.
BRING MAGAZINE for Thursday

A Secret Life
-Stephen Dunn

Why you need to have one
is not much more mysterious than
why you don't say what you think
at the birth of an ugly baby.
The secret life
begins early, is kept alive
by all that's unpopular
in you, all that you know
a Baptist, say, or some other
accountant would object to.
It becomes what you'd most protect
if the government said you can protect
one thing, all else is ours.
When you write late at night
it's like a small fire
in a clearing, it's what
radiates and what can hurt
if you get too close to it.
It's why your silence is a kind of truth.
Even when you speak to your best friend,
the one who'll never betray you,
you always leave out one thing;
a secret life is that important.
e e cummings
when serpents bargain for the right to squirm
and the sun strikes to gain a living wage-
when thorns regard their roses with alarm
and rainbows are insured against old age

when every thrush may sing no new moon in
if all screech-owls have not okayed his voice
-and any wave signs on the dotted line
or else an ocean is compelled to close

when the oak begs permission of the birch
to make an acorn-valleys accuse their
mountains of having altitude-and march
denounces april as a saboteur

then we'll believe in that incredible
unanimal mankind(and not until)
The Black Snake

When the black snake
flashed onto the morning road,
and the truck could not swerve--
death, that is how it happens.

Now he lies looped and useless
as an old bicycle tire.
I stop the car
and carry him into the bushes.

He is as cool and gleaming
as a braided whip, he is as beautiful and quiet
as a dead brother.
I leave him under the leaves

and drive on, thinking
about death: its suddenness,
its terrible weight,
its certain coming. Yet under

reason burns a brighter fire, which the bones
have always preferred.
It is the story of endless good fortune.
It says to oblivion: not me!

It is the light at the center of every cell.
It is what sent the snake coiling and flowing forward
happily all spring through the green leaves before
he came to the road.

~ Mary Oliver ~
"Blackberry Eating"--- Galway Kinnell
I love to go out in late September
among the fat, overripe, icy, black blackberries
to eat blackberries for breakfast,
the stalks very prickly, a penalty
they earn for knowing the black art
of blackberry-making; and as I stand among them
lifting the stalks to my mouth, the ripest berries
fall almost unbidden to my tongue,
as words sometimes do, certain peculiar words
like strengths and squinched,
many-lettered, on-syllabled lumps,
which I squeeze, squinch open, and splurge well
in the silent, startled, icy, black language
of blackberry-eating in late September.
"To A Poor Old Woman"
--- William Carlos Williams

munching a plum on
the street a paper bag
of them in her hand


They taste good to her
They taste good
to her. They taste
good to her


You can see it by
the way she gives herself
to the one half
sucked out in her hand


Comforted Comforted
a solace of ripe plums
seeming to fill the air
They taste good to her
The Red Wheelbarrow
by William Carlos Williams


so much depends
upon

a red wheel
barrow

glazed with rain
water

beside the white
chickens.
the irises backed and packed
with tarnished tinfoil
seen through the lenses
of old scratched isinglass.
They shifted a little, but not
to return my stare.
--It was more like the tipping
of an object toward the light.
Model Poems

As we read these poems look for the sensory details that the poets present. How are they making those details vivid?



"coarse"

"dramatic reds and blacks"

"peony" isn't that a flower? Didn't I see the word "rosette" and "rose" too? It's cool how the poet equates this ugly fish with beautiful flowers. Is there something beautiful about a beat up fish?






Look at this list of items in the boat. How is this affecting the pace of the poem.










I stared and stared
and victory filled up
the little rented boat,
from the pool of bilge
where oil had spread a rainbow
around the rusted engine
to the bailer rusted orange,
the sun-cracked thwarts,
the oarlocks on their strings,
the gunnels--until everything
was rainbow, rainbow, rainbow!
And I let the fish go.


Elizabeth Bishop
Look into it's eyes? Why?
The Fish
I caught a tremendous fish
and held him beside the boat
half out of water, with my hook
fast in a corner of his mouth.
He didn't fight.
He hadn't fought at all.
He hung a grunting weight,
battered and venerable
and homely. Here and there
his brown skin hung in strips
like ancient wallpaper,
and its pattern of darker brown
was like wallpaper:
"tremendous" that's a good word. (diction) and it says more than "big"

"grunting weight" is another good choice. Says more than "heavy"

This is simile. It creates a really vivid picture of this old fish.
shapes like full-blown roses
stained and lost through age.
He was speckled and barnacles,
fine rosettes of lime,
and infested
with tiny white sea-lice,
and underneath two or three
rags of green weed hung down.
The poet carries it on for a while here, building more detail.
Imagery, I can really see what this ugly, old fish looks like.
Man, that's gross. Gross but vivid. That's a fine detail.
"rags", that's seaweed but by calling it "rags" it sounds older to me, like ragged.
While his gills were breathing in
the terrible oxygen
--the frightening gills,
fresh and crisp with blood,
that can cut so badly--
I thought of the coarse white flesh
packed in like feathers,
the big bones and the little bones,
the dramatic reds and blacks
of his shiny entrails,
and the pink swim-bladder
like a big peony.
I looked into his eyes
which were far larger than mine
but shallower, and yellowed,
I admired his sullen face,
the mechanism of his jaw,
and then I saw
that from his lower lip
--if you could call it a lip
grim, wet, and weaponlike,
hung five old pieces of fish-line,
or four and a wire leader
with the swivel still attached,
with all their five big hooks
grown firmly in his mouth.
She "admires" its "sullen face." Hmm, are old faces admirable? What is it about them?


Wow, this old dude has survived at least 5 times>
A green line, frayed at the end
where he broke it, two heavier lines,
and a fine black thread
still crimped from the strain and snap
when it broke and he got away.
Like medals with their ribbons
frayed and wavering,
a five-haired beard of wisdom
trailing from his aching jaw.
Colors of the line, that adds to the sensory experience.

Another simile.


Wisdom?
There are all sorts of poetry anthologies in the room.
We are going to spend time skimming and reading poems in books
, looking for ones that say something to YOU...like:

"Hey! This is just like my relationship with my Boo!"

"Hey! This remind me of that one time when..."

"I love that line! I wish I had written that line. If I could write like that, my life would be complete."
Jot lines, stanza, and even entire poems into your WNB.
Include the poet and title whenever you lift a line for your WNB!
Find TWO full poems you like!
Found Poems
Too Many Daves
BY THEODOR GEISEL
Did I ever tell you that Mrs. McCave
Had twenty-three sons and she named them all Dave?
Well, she did. And that wasn't a smart thing to do.
You see, when she wants one and calls out, "Yoo-Hoo!
Come into the house, Dave!" she doesn't get one.
All twenty-three Daves of hers come on the run!
This makes things quite difficult at the McCaves'
As you can imagine, with so many Daves.
And often she wishes that, when they were born,
She had named one of them Bodkin Van Horn
And one of them Hoos-Foos. And one of them Snimm.
And one of them Hot-Shot. And one Sunny Jim.
And one of them Shadrack. And one of them Blinkey.
And one of them Stuffy. And one of them Stinkey.
Another one Putt-Putt. Another one Moon Face.
Another one Marvin O'Gravel Balloon Face.
And one of them Ziggy. And one Soggy Muff.
One Buffalo Bill. And one Biffalo Buff.
And one of them Sneepy. And one Weepy Weed.
And one Paris Garters. And one Harris Tweed.
And one of them Sir Michael Carmichael Zutt
And one of them Oliver Boliver Butt
And one of them Zanzibar Buck-Buck McFate ...
But she didn't do it. And now it's too late.

"A poet can survive everything but a misprint."
Oscar Wilde


"A poet is, before anything else, a person who is passionately in love with language."
W. H. Auden


"A poet looks at the world the way a man looks at a woman."
Wallace Stevens


"A poet's autobiography is his poetry. Anything else is just a footnote. "
Yevgeny Yevtushenko
"A poem might be defined as thinking about feelings - about human feelings and frailties."
Anne Stevenson
"Hate Poem - Julie Sheehan
Billy Collins - "The Lanyard"
"A Letter to the Law" - Common
Becoming a community of poets
Start again. This is a second draft.
Zoom in on one line/idea/stanza in your first draft
Use that as the beginning of your second draft
Try to extend your thinking and add more about where you come from
Don't just "revise and edit" your first draft
Reading Immersion and Drafting
Mentor Text:
"The Lanyard" by Billy Collins
Habit:
Poets read a range of poetry

to study it and find poems they feel connected to and admire the ways poets structure poems.


Poets find poems that

connect to your life.

These poems seem almost autobiographical.

These poems are a support for you as you think about your life.
Invitation
Revising and Editing
Mentor Poems
These poems have some great words.
The Road Not Taken
We will:
Take risks with our own writing in the safe space of the classroom
Share our poetry with our peer review group
Use non-judgmental responses when classmates share their work
and offer ways to revise the poem
We will:
Read a range of poetry by professional poets (as a class)
Collect 10 poems of personal interest to create a poetry anthology (independently)
Use strategies to generate poems
Use poetic devices to craft poems
Reread and identify poems for publication/contest submission
Reflect on habits, strategies, and attitudes (write a metacog)
We will:
Use peer review groups to gain insight on drafted poems
to make revisions
Conduct experiments on our drafts
Create revision plans
Polish for publication and contest submission

Our Three-Pronged Approach to Poetry
Design Thinking Tie In:
This is a great chance for you to listen to your partner. Listening carefully builds empathy, and empathy makes you better at lots of other things,
“Where I’m From”
By George Ella Lyon

I am from clothespins,
from Clorox and carbon-tetrachloride,
I am from the dirt under the back porch.
(Black, glistening,
it tasted like beets.)

I am from the forsythia bush
the Dutch elm
whose long-gone limbs I remember
as if they were my own.
I’m from fudge and eyeglasses,
from Imogene and Alafair.

I’m from the know-it-alls
And the pass-it-ons,
from Perk up! and Pipe down!
I’m from He restoreth my soul
with a cottonball lamb
and ten verses I can say myself.

I’m from Artemus and Billie’s Branch,
fried corn and strong coffee.
from the finger my grandfather lost
to the auger,
the eye my father shut to keep his sight.
Under my bed was a dress box
spilling old pictures,
a sift of lost faces
to drift beneath my dreams,
I am from those moments—
snapped before I budded—
leaf-fall from the family tree.

http://www.ransomnotepoetry.com/ransomnotepoetry.html
Structure

Theme

Topic

"Oranges" by Gary Soto
The first time I walked
With a girl, I was twelve,
Cold, and weighted down
With two oranges in my jacket.
December. Frost cracking
Beneath my steps, my breath
Before me, then gone,
As I walked toward
Her house, the one whose
Porch light burned yellow
Night and day, in any weather.
A dog barked at me, until
She came out pulling
At her gloves, face bright
With rouge. I smiled,
Touched her shoulder, and led
Her down the street, across
A used car lot and a line
Of newly planted trees,
Until we were breathing
Before a drugstore. We
Entered, the tiny bell
Bringing a saleslady
Down a narrow aisle of goods.
I turned to the candies
Tiered like bleachers,
And asked what she wanted -
Light in her eyes, a smile
Starting at the corners
Of her mouth. I fingered
A nickle in my pocket,
And when she lifted a chocolate
That cost a dime,
I didn’t say anything.
I took the nickle from
My pocket, then an orange,
And set them quietly on
The counter. When I looked up,
The lady’s eyes met mine,
And held them, knowing
Very well what it was all
About.

Outside,
A few cars hissing past,
Fog hanging like old
Coats between the trees.
I took my girl’s hand
In mine for two blocks,
Then released it to let
Her unwrap the chocolate.
I peeled my orange
That was so bright against
The gray of December
That, from some distance,
Someone might have thought
I was making a fire in my hands.
"Those Winter Sundays"
by Robert Hayden

Sundays too my father got up early
and put his clothes on in the blueblack cold,
then with cracked hands that ached
from labor in the weekday weather made
banked fires blaze. No one ever thanked him.

I’d wake and hear the cold splintering, breaking.
When the rooms were warm, he’d call,
and slowly I would rise and dress,
fearing the chronic angers of that house,

Speaking indifferently to him,
who had driven out the cold
and polished my good shoes as well.
What did I know, what did I know
of love’s austere and lonely offices?
Concept #2:
Concept #1:
Concept #3:
Our Beliefs About the Writer's Notebook
The WNB supports the English department's motto:
We write to find out what we think;
we read to find out who we are.

The WNB is a safe place to jot down ideas and to draft without worrying about writing being "good" or "correct."

The WNB is a place to respond to reading.

Your WNB must be brought to class every day.

Your WNB must be maintained: Glue-ins must be adhered to a page with glue or tape. Entries must be completed, even when you are absent.

Drawings and doodles are acceptable and sometimes even required.
ENGLISH 10
Launching the Writer's Notebook:

POETRY

Session One
Session 4
Session 6
Session 10
Turn & Talk (2 minutes)
Invitation
Turn & Talk (2 minutes)
Tell your partner a little bit about your free write
Invitation: Draft two different
"Where I Come From" poems
ATTEMPT #2
Turn & Talk (3-4 minutes)
Read your poem out loud to your partner
Don't feel shy or embarrassed

Just read a piece if you feel awkward!

Listeners: Use non-judgmental responses

Bring an ARTIFACT or a picture of an artifact to class tomorrow
The artifact should be something that has importance to you
It will be a springboard for writing poetry
HOMEWORK
Session 2
Strategy: Poets use strategies to get started.
Litany:
A repetitive series
Poetic Devices
1. Imagery
2. Stanza and Line Breaks
3. Metaphor and Simile
4. The Sounds of Words:
Alliteration, Consonance, Assonance

Imagery:
The use of vivid language to generate ideas and/or evoke mental images, not only of the visual
sense, but of sensation and emotion as well.

Poetry works it magic by the way it uses words to evoke “images” that carry depths of meaning.


Line Breaks and Stanzas
Stanza:
A division of a poem created by arranging the lines into a unit
Poetic Device:
IMPACT OF LINE BREAKS

1. Emphasize words and details

2. Express an emotion, attitude, or humor

3. Make a connection clear (repetition)

4. Create a shift in time, idea, emotion, meaning
A line is a subdivision of a poem, specifically a group of words arranged into a row that ends for a reason other than the right-hand margin.


See more at: http://www.poetryarchive.org/glossary/line#sthash.Fj0XJY55.dpuf
Let's reexamine the poem, "Foul Shot"
to see how Hoey emphasizes words with his line breaks.
Turn & Talk (3 minutes)
What seems to be Hoey's purpose with his FIRST WORDS?
Practice
Invitation to Revise
Poetic Device
Imagery
Borrowing Lines
Purposes for Poems
Peer Review Groups
Experiments
REVISION
POETS FALL IN LOVE WITH WORDS
The "Ransom Note" Poem
BRING A MAGAZINE TOMORROW!
WORK SPACE
Poetry Experiment DIrections
OLD
POETRY EXCHANGE
REVISION
POSSIBLE POEMS
THE NEW PREZI
Day 1
Session 3
Session 7
Session 5
Session 9
EXPERIMENTING
WITH POETRY
Session 8


Alliteration
is the repetition of the same or similar sounds
at the start of words. Tongue twisters are created through alliteration.

Example:
She sells sea shells at the sea shore.

Example
from Shakespeare’s
Romeo and Juliet
:
The very pin of his heart cleft with the
blind bow boy’s butt
shaft.






Consonance
is the repetition, positioned closely together, of the final consonant/sound of a word.

Example:
I had to
think
about what to write on the
blank
on the form at the
bank
.

Example from Frost’s “Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening”:
Whose

woods
are these I think I
know
His
house
is in the village
though

http://poetryinternational.sdsu.edu/
Assonance
is the repetition of a pattern of similar vowel sounds.

Example:
The plate was shapely and well-made. (Pattern: Long A sound)

Example from Poe’s “The Bells”:
From the molten-golden notes. (Pattern: Long O sound)
The Sounds of Words: Alliteration, Assonance, Consonance
WORDS, WORDS, WORDS
The Black Snake

When the black snake
flashed onto the morning road,
and the truck could not swerve--
death, that is how it happens.

Now he lies looped and useless
as an old bicycle tire.
I stop the car
and carry him into the bushes.

He is as cool and gleaming
as a braided whip, he is as beautiful and quiet
as a dead brother.
I leave him under the leaves

and drive on, thinking
about death: its suddenness,
its terrible weight,
its certain coming. Yet under

reason burns a brighter fire, which the bones
have always preferred.
It is the story of endless good fortune.
It says to oblivion: not me!

It is the light at the center of every cell.
It is what sent the snake coiling and flowing forward
happily all spring through the green leaves before
he came to the road.

~ Mary Oliver ~
Model Poem: The Black Snake
Visual Imagery: Something seen in the minds eye

Auditory Imagery: Language that represents a sound or sounds

Olfactory Imagery: Language representing the sense of smell

Gustatory Imagery: A taste

Tactile Imagery: Touch, for example, hardness, softness, wetness, heat, cold

Organic Imagery: Internal sensation: Hunger, thirst, fatigue, fear

Kinesthetic Imagery: Movement or tension
7 Types of Imagery
Arranging Words
Personal Poetry Collection
Autobiographical Poems
Over the course of the unit, you will collect ten poems for a personal poetry collection.
Fifth Grade Autobiography

I was four in this photograph fishing
with my grandparents at a lake in Michigan.
My brother squats in poison ivy.
His Davy Crockett cap
sits squared on his head so the raccoon tail
flounces down the back of his sailor suit.

My grandfather sits to the far right
in a folding chair,
and I know his left hand is on
the tobacco in his pants pocket
because I used to wrap it for him
every Christmas. Grandmother's hips
bulge from the brush, she's leaning
into the ice chest, sun through the trees
printing her dress with soft
luminous paws.

I am staring jealously at my brother;
the day before he rode his first horse, alone.
I was strapped in a basket
behind my grandfather.
He smelled of lemons. He's died—

but I remember his hands.
~Rita Dove (1989)

A litany is a form of poetry that repeats, repeats, repeats and circles.

However, it is more than just a list of repeated words and phrases; it is a form of repetition in which each new line increases a poem’s tension until the meaning and emotion of the poem reach a climax.
“Remember”
Joy Harjo


Remember the sky that you were born under,
know each of the star's stories.
Remember the moon, know who she is. I met her
in a bar once in Iowa City.
Remember the sun's birth at dawn, that is the
strongest point of time. Remember sundown
and the giving away to night.
Remember your birth, how your mother struggled
to give you form and breath. You are evidence of
her life, and her mother's, and hers.
Remember your father. He is your life also.
Remember the earth whose skin you are:
red earth, black earth, yellow earth, white earth
brown earth, we are earth.
Remember the plants, trees, animal life who all have their
tribes, their families, their histories, too. Talk to them,
listen to them. They are alive poems.
Remember the wind. Remember her voice. She knows the
origin of this universe. I heard her singing Kiowa war
dance songs at the corner of Fourth and Central once.
Remember that you are all people and that all people are you.
Remember that you are this universe and that this universe is you.
Remember that all is in motion, is growing, is you.
Remember that language comes from this.
Remember the dance that language is, that life is.
Remember.

A Valentine for Ernest Mann
--Naomi Shihab Nye

You can't order a poem like you order a taco.
Walk up to the counter, say, "I'll take two"
and expect it to be handed back to you
on a shiny plate.
Still, I like your spirit.
Anyone who says, "Here's my address,
write me a poem," deserves something in reply.
So I'll tell you a secret instead:
poems hide. In the bottoms of our shoes,
they are sleeping. They are the shadows
drifting across our ceilings the moment
before we wake up. What we have to do
is live in a way that lets us find them.

Once I knew a man who gave his wife
two skunks for a valentine.
He couldn't understand why she was crying.
"I thought they had such beautiful eyes."
And he was serious. He was a serious man
who lived in a serious way. Nothing was ugly
just because the world said so. He really
liked those skunks. So, he reinvented them
as valentines and they became beautiful.
At least, to him. And the poems that had been hiding
in the eyes of the skunks for centuries
crawled out and curled up at his feet.
Maybe if we reinvent whatever our lives give us
we find poems. Check your garage, the odd sock
in your drawer, the person you almost like, but not quite.
And let me know.

Free Write in Your WNB:
Make a list of topics you could write about.
Where do your poems "hide"?
Great! Now you have two different poems (on the same theme).
And it is only day 2!
Discussion of why she wrote the poem @ 2:23
NOW: Analyze/close read the poem(s) identifying any/all types of imagery and literary devices. Which one best paints a picture in your mind?
http://www.georgeellalyon.com/where.html
2nd hour

Tell a story
Self-expression
Timelessness
Bring people together
3rd hour
Express yourself in words
To rhyme
Put personality in your writing
Create emotion (self/reader)
Informative
Give opinions on real events
Find deeper meaning
Tell a story
Entertained
Moral/Lesson
Get out your own feelings
Poems = lyrics
Informal--no guidelines--just write
Challenge your writing--use specific forms
Sung, rapped, slammed
Get your brain working
Outlet for your failed teen romance
Universal-- all people, all places, all times
5th hour
Tell a story
Be bigger than yourself
Express yourself
Informational / to inform
Can be an easier way to get out emotions and thoughts
"Catchy"--rhyme
To better understand people's emotions
For writers to do what they love
To remember a person, place, or thing
To learn (Spanish haiku teaches verb tense
What are your general thoughts and feelings (your attitude) about reading and writing poetry?

Jot it in your WNB
Mentor Poem
I call it:
Poem Impossible
Focus on
Metaphor, Simile,
and Personification
You have been writing poetry for a bit now, and I bet you are ready for a challenge!
Feedback and Revision

Poets engage in response groups with readers, writers and friends to gain insight into their own writing.
While this conversation is going on the poet is to take note on the notecard-you have to show me this to get credit for the session. Fill both side with ideas/plans/revisions/explainations/reactions...

Switch Poets and repeat the process.
Poet
Distribute your poem.
Take a notecard.

Read your poem to the group.

Listen and take notes.
Group:
Listen and read along-make any notes on your copy of the poem.
Talk to the other group members-not the poet-about the poem.
In groups 3-4
Now that you have a few entries in your notebook it is time to get some exposure.

Get in groups of 3 or 4. Take turns reading entries to the group.

Listeners will tell the writer what they found most memorable about their entries and make non-judgmental statements using the following sentence starters:
I noticed…
The line that sticks out for me is…
The part I remember best is…
I felt…when this happened in the story…
I wish I knew more about…
I wonder…
This part in the story reminded me of…
The writer will take notes on the nonjudgmental feedback in their notebooks.Teaching Point
Poets Engage
in a Community
to get Feedback
It is time to revise our poems!
Goals:
1. I use a variety of revision strategies (experiments) to rework my poems.

2. I reflect on the multiple drafts of my work and make decisions about which draft is the most effective.

3. I edit and revise my work to make it the best it can be before I submit it for publication.
Directions for Experimenting
1. All experiments are on Google Classroom
2.
Unit Metacog

With a partner, brainstorm a list of ten objects in this room that are IMPOSSIBLE to write a poem about.

Select an object and craft a poem about it.

Focus on:
1. creating deliberate line breaks.
2. Using figurative language

20-30 lines
INVITATION
Loneliness

As a metaphor:
As a simile:

Review the definitions of METAPHOR, SIMILE, and PERSONIFICATION with your partner
Practice generating examples of figurative language
Poets make decisions about to break lines of poetry.

Poets use LINE BREAKS to emphasize

a phrase

a first word
a last word

OR to
speed up/
slow down
the poem
.
Now! Words the BUG YOU!

List at least 10
Full transcript