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Immigration to the United States

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Dave Echelmeier

on 14 July 2013

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Transcript of Immigration to the United States

Immigration to the United States
What does immigrate mean?
Did you know that from 1881 to 1920, almost 24 million people immigrated to the United States?

What does it mean to immigrate? As we explore this unit on immigration, think about this question as we watch the video clip about Mai and her grandfather's experience with immigrating to America.

Write the definition of immigrate in your Social Studies journal when you discover it.
Instructional Purpose
In our third grade classroom, we explore a Social Studies Unit focusing on Immigration to America. Throughout the unit, we examine the definition of immigration, the reasons people had for immigrating to America, the voyage to America, and life as an immigrant. The purpose of this Prezi is to synthesize the experience utilizing the map in a visual and interactive way.

This presentation can be explored in a linear or non-linear fashion.

Targeted Standards
The following PA Academic Content Standards are emphasized with this Prezi:

Common Core Language Arts Standards
1.2 Reading Informational Text
Students read, understand, and respond to informational text—with an emphasis on comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, and making connections among ideas and between texts with a focus on textual evidence.

1.4 Writing
Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused text to convey a well­defined perspective and appropriate content.

United States History 8.3.3.D.
Identify and describe how conflict and cooperation among groups and organizations have impacted the history and development of the US.
• Ethnicity and race and immigration

EDIM 508: Digital Media in the Classroom
Citation
Paul Fuqua,  (2004). Ocean liner from air. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/
Image Source:
IRC,  (2005). Japanese-Americans in Stockton.. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/
While watching, think of the question: What does the word immigrate mean?
Video Source:
100% Educational Videos,  (2004). American Heritage: Immigration to the United States. [Full Video]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Why did people immigrate to America?
Now that we know to immigrate means "to move," we will explore why immigrants came to America from the mid 1800s to the early 1900s.

There are many reasons why people left their own country to make the trip to America. Can you think of any before we explore them? Write two possible reasons down in your Social Studies notebook.
While watching, think of the question: Why did people immigrate to America? Pause the video if you need to.
Video Source:
100% Educational Videos,  (2004). American Heritage: Immigration to the United States. [Full Video]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Where did immigrants come from?
While immigrants to America came from all over the world, the greatest number of them were from Europe.

While watching the next video, answer the question, what are some countries immigrants came from and why did they immigrate from there?

Then, you will explore some of these places on the map.
Image Citation:
National Constitution Center - Centuries of Citizenship - Map: Immigration to the United States 1880-1920. (n.d.). Home - National Constitution Center. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://constitutioncenter.org/timeline/html/cw
This map shows the number of immigrants who came from different countries to the United States from 1881-1920.

While watching, think of the question: What countries did people immigrate from and why did they come?
Video Source:
100% Educational Videos,  (2004). American Heritage: Immigration to the United States. [Full Video]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Immigrants from Southeast Asia traveled across the Pacific Ocean to San Francisco.
These immigrants from Asia arrived at Angel Island Immigration Station.
Image Citation: Angel Island Photo Gallery. (n.d.). Welcome to English « Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/
San Francisco
Angel Island
Image Citation: IRC, (2005). Chinese Immigrants at the SF Custom House, 1877. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/
Immigrants from Europe traveled across the Atlantic Ocean to New York City.
European Immigrants arrived at Ellis Island in the New York City Harbor.
New York City
Image Citation:
IRC,  (2005). Ellis Island a primary U.S. immigration port.. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/
Library of Congress,  . Ellis Island; Immigrants waiting to be examined. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/
Many families traveled traveled through Ellis Island, in New York City's harbor, to get to America. The picture below shows immigrants coming from Europe on a ship and seeing the Statue of Liberty for the first time.

Image Citation: Welcome to Immigration. (n.d.). Scholastic, Helping Children Around the World to Read and Learn | Scholastic.com. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/tour/stop2.htm

Image Citation: Jupiterimages Corporation,  (2006). Statue of Liberty (3). [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/
Lawrence Meinwald shares his experience coming to America from Poland in 1920 at age 6. His family traveled in steerage. Meinwald describes the ship, the sleeping arrangements, the food, and seeing the Statue of Liberty for the first time.

Click play to listen below.
Audio Citation:
The Oral History of Lawrence Meinwald From Poland (n.d.). Welcome to Immigration. Scholastic, Helping Children Around the World to Read and Learn | Scholastic.com. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/tour/stop2.htm

What was life like for early immigrants?
Being an immigrant was not easy in the late 1800s to the early 1920s. Most immigrants traveled by ship. The conditions were rough, and immigrants were often in steerage, or the cheapest and dirtiest part of the boat.

Once immigrants were in America, "the land of opportunity," it wasn't necessarily easy. Immigrants often settled in big cities to work in factories for little money. They were crammed into dirty apartment buildings called tenements, and many families often lived in one apartment together.

Think of why immigrants were happier in America than in their home country while viewing this final video.
Image Citation:
IRC, (2005). Bohemian cigarmakers at work in their tenement.. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

While watching, think of the question: Why were immigrants happier in America than in their home country?
Video Source:
100% Educational Videos,  (2004). American Heritage: Immigration to the United States. [Full Video]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Resources for More Exploration
Scholastic Ellis Island Virtual Tour

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/tour/

Scholastic Young Immigrant Exploration

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/young_immigrants/‎

Works Cited
100% Educational Videos,  (2004). American Heritage: Immigration to the United States. [Full Video]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Angel Island Photo Gallery. (n.d.). Welcome to English « Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/

IRC, (2005). Bohemian cigarmakers at work in their tenement. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

IRC,  (2005). Ellis Island a primary U.S. immigration port.. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

IRC,  (2005). Japanese-Americans in Stockton.. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Jupiterimages Corporation,  (2006). Statue of Liberty (3). [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Library of Congress,  . Ellis Island; Immigrants waiting to be examined. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

National Constitution Center - Centuries of Citizenship - Map: Immigration to the United States 1880-1920. (n.d.). Home - National Constitution Center. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://constitutioncenter.org/timeline/html/cw

The Oral History of Lawrence Meinwald From Poland (n.d.). Welcome to Immigration. Scholastic, Helping Children Around the World to Read and Learn | Scholastic.com. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/tour/stop2.htm

Paul Fuqua,  (2004). Ocean liner from air. [Image]. Available from http://www.discoveryeducation.com/

Welcome to Immigration. (n.d.). Scholastic, Helping Children Around the World to Read and Learn | Scholastic.com. Retrieved July 13, 2013, from http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/immigration/tour/stop2.htm
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