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George Washington Carver

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by

Jason Brown

on 29 October 2015

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Transcript of George Washington Carver

Carver's peanut and sweet potato inventions had a dramatic impact on farmers, especially in the South. Peanuts and sweet potatoes were cheap to plant and easier to farm. The problem was no one wanted to buy peanuts, because there was nothing to do with them. This is where Carver made his impact. He gave people reasons to use peanuts.
George was born into slavery during the Civil War. After the war, he continued to live with his former owners. They taught him and his brother to read and write. Carter was never married and had no children.
George had a great love for education. He attended 2 colleges learning to paint, before finally attending Iowa State Agricultural Institute. He graduated from there with a degree in Botany. From there Carver was offered a job teaching at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama.
George Washington Carver created hundreds of uses for the peanut.
Carver was given many awards during and after his life. He was the first African-American and non-President to receive a National Monument. The US Navy named two ships after him. He has appeared on stamps, and has had dozens of schools named after him.
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