Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Effect of the Amount of Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda) on Photosynthesis

By: Caitlin Neu, Tessa Barth, Annie Raisanen, Zach Brost
by

A R

on 24 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Effect of the Amount of Sodium Bicarbonate (baking soda) on Photosynthesis

Caitlin Neu, Annie Raisanen,
Tessa Barth, Zach Brost Photosynthesis The Effect of the Amount of Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda) on Photosynthesis Conclusion How would doubling the amount of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) used in the water effect how fast the spinach punches rise? Investigative Question: If we double the amount of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), then the punches will rise faster due to more carbon dioxide in the solution being present for photosynthesis to occur. Hypothesis: Graph & Data Table- Analysis From this investigation, we learned that an increase in carbon dioxide allows for photosynthesis to occur at a faster rate. Our hypothesis of "if the amount of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) doubles in the water solution, then the punches will rise faster. This is due to more carbon dioxide being present for photosynthesis to occur", appeared to be correct. Our solution with 6 grams of sodium bicarbonate had spinach punches that began to rise once three minutes had passed, and our solution with 3 grams of sodium bicarbonate had spinach punches that did not begin to rise until seven minutes had passed. The more sodium bicarbonate present, there is a greater amount of carbon dioxide present, which in result will increase the speed of photosynthesis. There may be human error in our experiment, such as timing the punches under the light. A further question for research is, what is the amount of sodium bicarbonate that will not increase the speed of photosynthesis anymore, and the speed of rising punches will reach a plateau? By: Zach Brost, Caitlin Neu, Annie Raisanen, Tessa Barth Analysis Continued Carbon dioxide makes photosynthesis take part in a plant, faster. When more sodium bicarbonate was present in our cup of spinach punches, the punches rose to the top of the cup at a faster rate than when less carbon dioxide was present. This is because carbon dioxide goes into a plant for light independent reactions to occur. One error that happened in our experiment was the human error of timing. We may have not started/stopped the time at the exact times we put the punches under the light. Another error is not all of the air bubbles may have completely been removed from our syringe before the spinach punches floated to the bottom. Conclusion Continued The function of the sodium bicarbonate in this experiment, was providing carbon dioxide for photosynthesis to occur. Light independent reactions take part in the stroma. For photosynthesis to happen for a light independent reaction, carbon dioxide needs to enter the plant. This includes hydrogen atoms and electrons. Once photosynthesis occurs for this type of reaction, sugar is produced. The energy used for a light independent reaction is energy (ATP) from the light dependent reactions and the sugar energy. The process that allowed the leaf punches to rise was photosynthesis. The trial with six grams of sodium bicarbonate provided the best results for our experiment. The purpose of using a solution that consisted of water and soap for one trial of our experiment was to prove that without carbon dioxide present, photosynthesis can not occur. If the spinach leaves were boiled before being used in the experiment, it would take them a longer time to rise to the top of the solution. This is because when water is boiled, carbon dioxide is given off, and without carbon dioxide photosynthesis will take a longer time to happen. When the light intensity is stronger, photosynthesis happens quicker, compared to when the light intensity is not as strong. Light intensity and the rate of photosynthesis relate to the sun's position both during the day and during the year, because when the sun is closer to the Earth, the plants grow better. For example, in the spring and summer, the sun comes close to the Earth. This is considered gardening season, and plants grow easier with the sunlight provided. Also when the sun is out during the day, plants seem to open up from the sunlight, and at night when the sun goes down, plants close up more.
Full transcript