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Unit 3: Health, Safety and Security in Health and Social Care

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David Howard

on 6 October 2014

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Transcript of Unit 3: Health, Safety and Security in Health and Social Care



Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
COSHH 1994
RIDDOR 1995
First Aid 1981
Food Handling 1995
Data Protection Act 1998
Disability Discrimination Act 1995


- Covers personal security as well as information
in relation to service users and service providers
- Access to and storage of personal information
- Access to facilities
- When working in the community



- Covers the safety of service users as well as the
service providers
- Appropriate training for staff
- Safe care practices
- Checking and maintaining equipment and facilities
- Safe employment policies



- Covers the health of service users as well as service
providers
- Avoiding spread of infections
- Reporting diseases
- Providing a healthy environment
- Promoting health
- Ensuring good practice




Any questions?

Learning outcome 1:
Understand potential
hazards in health and
social care

Health and Safety
Accidents causing major injury in residential care
Accidents causing absence over 3 days in health services
Accidents causing major injury in health services
The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)


The RIDDOR regulations involve:
employers;
employees;
the self-employed;
trainees;
other people who are injured on the work premises.
Summary
The RIDDOR regulations cover:
- deaths and major injuries;
- incapacity to work for more than 3 days;
- specified diseases;
- dangerous occurrences or near misses.

RIDDOR involves everyone.


Fire requires 3 elements: heat, oxygen, fuel.


Remove 1 element and the fire will not burn.
Accidents causing absence over 3 days in residential care
Statistics on health and safety
There are approximately 11,500 reported accidents each year in the NHS.

These often cause, major injury or more than three days absence from work.


There is at least 1 slip or trip accident every 3 minutes.
Electricity
Electricity can cause severe injury and death.

You must ensure electrical equipment is kept in good repair and is tested for safety each year.

Ensure your service users are protected from electrical dangers if they are unable to protect themselves.

Record your ideas for working safely on page 38 in the your handbook.
Slips, trips and falls
Slips, trips and falls are common cause of work accidents.

Most are a result of poor housekeeping.

Most can be prevented by using a small risk assessment and common sense.

Write down your ideas for preventing slips, trips and falls on page 35 in the your handbook.
Moving and handling
All care areas provide moving and handling training.

Make sure you have attended the training.

Make sure you use the appropriate moving and handling techniques to prevent injury to yourself and patients.
Fire
Never use hose reels, water extinguishers or any other means of extinguishing with water on:

- live electrical apparatus;
- any fire involving fats, oils, paints, and so on;
- any metal fire.

You risk electrocution or explosion.
Fire Extinguishers
Fire
– Putting up signs and notices so people know what to do.

– Having evacuation drills.

– Keeping fire exits clear.

– Testing fire alarms.

– Training employees to use fire extinguishers.
Fire
All three elements need to be present for a fire to start.

If you remove one element, you will be able to put a fire out.
Accident reporting
Accidents need to be reported and entered into the accident book.

Serious accidents and those where employees are absent as a result of an accident for more than 3 days have to be reported to the enforcing authority, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE)
First aid
Employers have to make the first aid arrangements known to employees by:

- putting up notices to tell employees where the first aid kit is;

- who and where the first aider or appointed person is.
First aid
A basic first aid kit should contain the following (numbers in brackets for travelling first aid kits):

20 x individually wrapped sterile adhesive dressings (6).
2 x sterile eye pads.
6 x individually wrapped triangular bandages (2).
6 x safety pins (2).
6 x medium sized wrapped sterile unmedicated wound dressings.
2 x large sized wrapped sterile unmedicated wound dressings (1).
3 x extra large sized wrapped sterile umedicated wound dressings.
1 x guidance leaflet First Aid at Work (1).
First aid
An employer has to make adequate arrangements to treat employees and others who are injured or become ill at work.

Employers have to appoint a first aider or more than one first aider depending on the number of employees and the risk involved in the employer’s work.
Accidents
An accident is an unplanned and uncontrolled event, which has led to, or could have caused, injury to persons, damage to buildings, equipment or other loss.

Accidents can have many causes and most accidents have more than one cause.

Accidents are preventable.
Summary of safety signs
There are four types of safety signs in general use:
- prohibition;
- mandatory;
- warning;
- safe condition.

Each has a designated shape and colour.

If you are unsure about anything, ASK.
Four types of safety sign
This is a SAFE CONDITION SIGN (safe place or way to go).

These signs are a green rectangle or square with a white pictogram and text.
Four types of safety sign
This is a MANDATORY SIGN (must obey).

These signs feature a blue circle with white pictogram.

Any text must be white on a blue background.
Four types of safety sign
This is a PROHIBITION SIGN (stop/must not).

It is circular with a white background, black pictogram and red border and crossbar.

All writing is white on a red background.

This example means “no smoking”.
Safety signs
The health and safety (safety signs and signals) regulations require employers to provide safety signs to raise awareness of risks to health and safety.

There are four types of safety signs in general use.

Each has a designated shape and colour.

They ensure that information is provided in a standard format with minimum
use of words.
Health and safety
Safety signs.
Accidents.
First aid.
The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations.
Fire.
Moving and handling.
Slips, trips and falls.
Electricity.
Toys and play materials.
Common words, abbreviations and meanings.
Being safe at work.
Fire
Below is a list of things which might help reduce the risk of fire or people being harmed if there is a fire:

Not smoking at work (no smoking areas designated).

Maintaining all electrical appliances in a safe manner.

Good housekeeping.
First aid
For low risk employers and / or where there are few employees it is adequate to authorise someone (‘appointed person’) to take charge.

Employers with a first aider or first aiders also tend to have these appointed persons to cover situations when first aiders are not present.


Serious conditions include:

electric shock requiring attention;

unconsciousness through lack of oxygen;

poisoning;

acute illness due to exposure to certain materials;

hospitalisation for more than 24 hours.
The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)
Accidents
Individual employees and clients can suffer:
- death;
- serious injury;
- pain;
- disability.

Money can also be lost through absence from work or inability to work.
More importantly, quality of care or quality of life can be reduced.
Four types of safety sign
This is a WARNING SIGN (risk of danger).

It is triangular with a yellow background, black pictogram and black border.

All writing is black on a yellow background.

This example means “caution toxic substance”.
Safety signs
Remember the general duty of employees:
- To co-operate with your employer.
- To comply with the law and employers, safe systems.
- To use safety equipment properly and correct.
Fire (continued)
– Removing combustible materials outside to a safe place.

– Not storing highly flammable liquids.

– Maintaining all gas supplies.

– Storing flammable materials in metal cupboards.

– Disposing of cigarettes carefully.

– Having fire points nearby.

– Having procedures if there is a fire.
The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)


The RIDDOR regulations cover:
- deaths and major injuries;
- incapacity to work for more than 3 days;
- specified diseases;
- dangerous occurrences or near misses.

Any of the above occurrences must be reported to the HSE.
Accidents
Employees can help prevent accidents by:

putting into practice training and instructions given;
following the employer’s rules;
reporting hazardous situations;
keeping the workplace clean and tidy;
not fooling around at work;
using common sense;
asking when unsure of what to do or how to do something;
being alert at all times.
Accidents
Accidents can cost money to employers through,
- insurance costs;
- fines;
- compensation claims;
- damage to property or equipment;
- loss of quality of life;
- loss of the employees’ time.
Caution.
Safety signs examples
Gloves must be worn.
Safety signs examples
No smoking.
Do not extinguish with water.
Not drinking water.
Summary
All fire extinguishers are colour coded for the type of fire they can be used on.
Contact with electricity can cause:
- ventricular fibrillation (stops the heart);
- internal organ damage;
- severe burns;
- loss of limbs;
- death.
The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)


Major injuries include:
- fractures;
- amputation of any bone;
- loss of sight;

Infectious and reportable diseases, for example, food poisoning.
First aid.
Fire assembly point.
Safety Signs examples
Safety signs examples
Toxic hazard.
Risk of electric shock.
Summary
– There are over 1,300 accidents reported each year.

– An accident is an unplanned and uncontrolled event which has led to or could have caused injury to persons, damage to buildings or equipment or other loss.

– Accidents are preventable.

– An employer has to provide first aid materials to deal with minor injuries or conditions such as cuts, fractures, burns and so on.
Fire
Fire requires 3 elements:
FUEL
OXYGEN
HEAT
Fire
In case of a fire, no matter how small:

- raise the fire alarm;

- the designated person must call the fire brigade;

- close all doors and windows to prevent spread;

- leave the building;

- fight the fire with the extinguishers
provided, but do not put yourself in danger;

- keep between the fire and the way out.
Fire
FUEL can be anything that will burn, for example, wood, furniture, flammable liquid, gas, and so on.

OXYGEN ( or in normal circumstances air) will allow a fire to burn.

HEAT requires a minimum temperature, but a naked flame, match or spark are sufficient to start a fire, especially if in contact with something flammable.
Safety signs examples
Harmful chemicals.
Slippery surface.
Highly flammable or risk of fire.
Trip hazard.
No naked flames.
No eating.
Safety signs examples
No thoroughfare.
Toy not suitable for children younger than 3.
Define a hazard and a risk
Be able to identify hazards
Know the 4 main types of hazard
Explain when a non hazardous object can become a hazard
Lesson Aims
Did you achieve the lesson aims?
Hazard and Risk
Hazards & Risks
Please switch off your phone to help maintain a positive learning environment and show respect for your class mates!!
Your phone should be in your bag - and put your bag on the floor.
Is your mobile phone switched off?
Please switch off your phone to help maintain a positive learning environment and show respect for your class mates!!
Your phone should be in your bag - and put your bag on the floor.

Is your mobile phone switched off?
Understand what is meant by health, safety and security
Introduce key terminology
Know the different settings offering health and social care over all age ranges
Understand what services are available in different health and social care settings
Identify appropriate settings for placement

Lesson Aims
Please switch off your phone to help maintain a positive learning environment and show respect for your class mates!!
Your phone should be in your bag - and put your bag on the floor.
Is your mobile phone switched off?
Identify individuals who use or provide services within health and social care
Identify the needs and role of individuals and providers in different settings
Present your findings to the rest of the class
Lesson Aims
Health
Safety
Security
Legislation
1. Read through the individual information cards on the worksheet and decide which services can improve their living situations or meet their health and social care needs.

2. Then read the cards relating to the professional service providers and consider the different types of services they may provide and the types of client they would be working with.
Group Activity
Can you think of an example of each type of hazard that could occur in a health and social care setting?
Hazards can be broadly divided into four areas.
Types of hazard
Physical: anything that can cause physical harm, e.g. faulty electrical items, uneven pavements, broken glass
Biological: anything that can transmit infection, e.g. illness, poor hygiene, presence of vermin
Chemical: any substance that can cause harm, e.g. pesticides, bleach, medication
Social: any activity that is anti-social, e.g. shouting, playing loud music, behaving violently or abusively towards other people.
Team Game

Go around the college and find some hazards
Take photographs and record the hazards on the worksheet provided
Return to this room in 20 minutes with your results
Spotting hazards
Key words:
Hazard - Anything that can cause harm, such as a steep staircase.
Risk - Risk is the chance, high or low, that someone will be harmed by a hazard.
Define a hazard and a risk
Be able to identify hazards
Know the main types of hazard
Explain when a non hazardous object can
become a hazard
Spotting hazards and risks
In groups, identify hazards and risks you can find in the classroom.
Unit 3: Health, Safety and Security in Health and Social Care
Please wear your College ID
Please wear your College ID
Please wear your College ID
In small groups discuss accidents/injuries suffered previously

Use AS4 to plan how to reduce risks of accident/injury
Lesson Aims
Recognise hazards within different settings
Plan how to reduce the risks of accident and injury
Research facts/local statistics on accidental injuries
Lesson Aims
Research local venues used to provide services and entertain individuals
Identify the possible hazards of using public facilities
Group activity
Research local venues used to provide services and entertain individuals.

Plan activities and consider hazards - Refer to worksheet
Lesson Aims
Identify different types of abuse
Recognise different types of abuse in case studies
Discuss how abusive situations could be avoided
What is Abuse?
Abuse is any behaviour towards a person
that causes him or her harm or violates their
rights or dignity.
Suspected Abuse in Children
In cases of suspected abuse in children your priority is to make sure that someone listens to your concerns and takes them seriously. It is better for suspicions to be investigated and found to be unfounded than ignored and then found to be correct.
Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect
Physical Abuse
Unexplained injuries
Bruises
Fractures
Lacerations and/or abrasion
Physical Abuse
Types of Abuse
Emotional Abuse
Sexual Abuse
Neglect
Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect
Emotional Abuse
Emotionally or intellectually immature
Inadequate coping skills
Low self-esteem
Anti-social or destructive behaviour
Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect
Sexual Abuse
Difficulty in walking or sitting
Complaints of pain in genital area
Engages in fantasies
Bizarre or sophisticated sexual knowledge
Neglect
Poor hygiene
Inappropriate clothing
Hunger
Fatigue
Lack of supervision
Unattended physical or medical need
Indicators of Child Abuse and Neglect
Actual Abuse in Children
If a child tells you about abuse, your priority is the child, however nervous you are feeling. It will have taken a lot of courage for the child to speak to you, and you should remember that you must have gained a lot of trust for the child to feel able to talk to you.
Appropriate Response
Remain calm and reassure the child
Look for a quiet place to talk
Tell the child that you will need to tell someone, but reassure them that they have done the right thing, and it will be hard, but will get better
Believe what they tell you
Do not pressurise them to say more than they want to
Say that you are glad that the child told you
Report what has been said to the person at your placement who has been nominated to deal with child protection, who will take over and report the incident to social services if appropriate
Record what is said
Your response to abuse in people over 16 years depends on their ability to make a decision. This can be quite hard to assess. If you feel the person is capable, and does not want to report the abuse, then you should not do so. If, however, you feel that they do not have the capacity to make that decision, you should discuss it with the manager of the setting, who can decide what to do....
Abuse in Vulnerable Adults
Vanessa George
Group Activity
Complete case study work sheet identifying types of abuse.

Explain your reasons

Discuss any alternative actions the carer could have taken to avoid the situations becoming abusive.
Types of hazard in a health and social care setting
Hazards in the physical environment: Objects; people; building; the air and temperature
Hazards from equipment: Untidiness; poor maintenance; unsafe practice; lack of awareness
Hazards from infections: Food hygiene; inflenza; MRSA
Hazardous waste: Dressings; nappies; incontinence pads; syringes and needles
Hazardous substances: Cleaning fluids; medications; x-rays
Hazardous working conditions: Hours you work; staffing levels; staff relations
Hazardous working practices: Moving and handling, preparing food, changing napppies; giving injections; supervising individuals with challenging behaviour
Hazardous security systems: Keep staff and indviduals safe from intruders; locked doors; confidential information held on computer and in filing cabinets must be secure
Unintentional Abuse
Where staff do not understand good practice.
Physical abuse can include rough handling, or ignoring care needs leading to individuals falling, being incontinent or developing pressure ulcers.
Can you think of examples of unintentional abuse in a health or social care setting?
Poorly trained or stressed staff may not realise that they are not providing adequate care.

Infections can be passed on easily by staff who do not understand the importance of thorough hand-washing or do not put this into practice.
Poor care practice can be caused by inappropriate care planning, where individuals' needs are not adequately assessed, or the care strategies chosen are not effective.

This can result in exposure to dangers such as falls and pressure ulcers.
People with learning disabilities need careful planning to enable them to be as independent as possible, but if this is not done thoroughly they could face many hazards.

They may be unable to assess danger for themselves, and could be taken advantage of.
Another form of abuse and harm is dishonesty.
Safeguarding Lesson aims
Understand the role of the ISA Vetting and Barring Scheme
Know about safe employment practices
Know the implications of Disclosure and Barring Service checks in a health or social care setting
Legislation, policies and procedures for safeguarding vulnerable groups have made health
and social care staff more aware of what is regarded as abuse, and how to recognise that abuse may have occured.

These regulations will help you to know what to do if you suspect abuse, or a person tells you that they have been abused.
Procedures are in place to identify people who have previously committed offences to reduce the risk to vulnerable people, including children and young people, older people,those with learning disabilities and mental illness.
Enhanced disclosures
Under the Independent Safeguarding Authority's (ISA) Vetting and Barring Scheme, which replaced the Protection of Vulnerable Adults (PoVA) scheme in October 2009, all staff (including volunteers) working with vulnerable people must be checked by the Disclosure and Barring Service.

Anyone who works with children and vulnerable people has to undergo an enhanced disclosure, which will identify any previous cautions and offences, even if they are spent.
It is a criminal offence for individuals barred by the ISA to work, or apply to work, with children or vulnerable adults.

This includes working in the NHS, schools and nurseries, the Prison Service and residential homes for older people and those with learning or physical disabilities or mental illness.
A DBS form will only flag up those who have been cautioned or committed an offence, not those who have avoided detection, or those who have the potential to offend but have not yet done so.

Until a clear DBS clearance has been received, care workers should not be left unattended with individuals.
Group activity
Discuss how employers can safeguard clients and staff from false allegations.

Complete AS7: Safe employment practices
Health and Safety Legislation and guidelines
Know about health and safety legislation relevant to health and social care settings.
Group activity
In groups, research a piece of health and safety legislation.

Make sure you outline what the legislation is, what it does and how its has an influence on health and social care settings. It needs to be good, as the information given will be shared with your class to help them with the assignment.

You will need to present this back to the class in the form of a powerpoint or poster with a handout for the class.
Key terms
Guideline

Legislation

Regulation

Liability
Key terms
Guideline -
A statement of a policy or procedure to help you to follow regulations.

Legislation -
A law or group of laws.

Regulation -
A principle, rule or law designed to control behaviour.

Liability -
Taking responsibility for something.
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
Food Safety Act 1990
Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regualtions 1995
Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992
Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995
Data Protection Act 1998
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
Care Home Regulations
Control of Substances Hazrdous to Health (COSHH) 2002
Civil Contingencies Act 2004
Care Minimum Standards
Lesson aims
Health and Safety Legislation and guidelines
Ian Huntley
Holly Marie Wells and Jessica Aimee Chapman, two 10-year-old girls, were murdered in the village of Soham, Cambridgeshire on 4 August 2002. The girls passed the home of local school caretaker Ian Kevin Huntley, who called them into his house and then murdered them.
August 1995:
15-year-old girl admitted that she had been having sex with Huntley.

March 1996:
Charged in connection with a burglary.

March 1996:
Allegations of having sex with an underage girl.

April 1996:
Allegations of underage sex.

May 1996:
Allegations of having sex with a 13-year-old girl.

April 1998:
Suspicion of raping a woman.

May 1998:
Charged with rape and remanded in custody.

July 1998:
Allegations that he indecently assaulted an 11-year-old girl in September 1997.

February 1999:
Allegations of rape on a 17-year-old woman.

July 1999:
Suspected by police of rape of woman.
What is safeguarding?

Why is safeguarding important?

What evidence is required to apply for a DBS?
Group activity: Discussion
Previous allegations

Safety Signs
No Smoking allowed
This will test your understanding of the following:

Prohibitory
Warning
Mandatory
Fire
First Aid signs
This sign tells you that you MUST wear ear defenders when working in the area.
This means “Danger Electricity”

Blue and white signs tells you

what you MUST DO
CARBON DIOXIDE (CO2)
Red body with black label

Safe to use on any type of fire;

Safe to use on fires involving electricity;

Extinguishes by reducing oxygen levels and cooling.
Carbon dioxide [CO2]
extinguishers
POWDER
Red body with blue label.


Safe to use on any type of fire.


Works by chemically Interfering with the combustion reaction
Powder extinguishers
FOAM
Red Body with Cream label.

Suitable for Flammable liquids, petrol, solvents etc

Not suitable for use on fires
involving Electricity;

Extinguishes by cooling and sealing the surface of a burning liquid.
Foam extinguishers
WATER
Red body

Suitable for wood fires, furniture and paper etc.

Not suitable for combustible liquids, Oil, Petrol, cooking fats etc.

Not safe to use on fires involving electricity;

Extinguishes by cooling
Water extinguishers
What Makes a Fire ?
The fire triangle.
Protective Gloves Must be Worn
Blue Background with white pictogram is a
Mandatory or Must Do ie Wear Ear Defenders, Gloves, Goggles etc.
The correct features of a Mandatory safety sign are:

Round shape
White pictogram on a Blue background
White edging
Question 8
Which of the following signs means

Beware Electricity ?
The correct features of a prohibitory safety sign are:

round shape
black pictogram on a white background, red
edging and diagonal line.
Safety Signs
NO SMOKING
Any Red and White sign with a line through means:

“ Not Allowed or Must Not”
PRESS HERE TO SOUND THE FIRE ALARM
FIRE HOSE REEL
Fire Safety Signs
Other fire fighting equipment
Question 10
Ear Protection May be Worn
This is a Noisy Area
Caution Deaf
People
Ear Protection Must be Worn
What is the meaning of this sign ?
Question 7
Things you Must NOT do
Things you MUST do
The nearest fire exit
The hazard in the area
What do blue and white safety signs tell you ?
The correct features of a Information safety sign are:

Square or Rectangular shape

White pictogram on a Green background.
The correct features of a Fire safety sign are:

Square shape
White pictogram on a Red background
White edging
Question 1

Which image below that has
the correct shape and colour for a
Prohibitory or Do Not sign?
Question 9

Mandatory
Safety Information
Hazard Warning

Prohibited
What does this type of sign mean ?
Question 6
No Naked Light
Smoke Free Rest Area
No Smoking
What is the meaning of this sign ?
Smoking Allowed
Safety Signs
EXPLOSIVE
TOXIC
BEWARE
ELECTRICITY
The correct features of a Warning safety sign are:
Triangular shape
Black pictogram on a yellow background
Black edging
Blue + White = Mandatory or Must Do
Safety Signs
YOU MUST WEAR EAR DEFENDERS
YOU MUST WEAR SAFETY GLOVES
YOU MUST WEAR OVERALLS
Question 4
Which image below is the correct colour and
shape for a Fire sign?
Question 3
Which image below is the correct colour and shape for a Mandatory or Must Do sign?
Safe Route to Fire Exit
First Aid Kit
Green + White = SAFETY Information
Safety Signs
Yellow + Black = HAZARD WARNING
FLAMMABLE SUBSTANCE
Safety Signs
Safety Signs
Yellow/Black=H&S Hazard Warning
Green/White=Safety Information
Red/White=Must NOT Do
Blue/White=Must Do
!
Question 2
Which image below is the correct colour
and shape for a warning sign?
Question 5
Which image below that is the correct colour and shape for a Safety Information sign?
C.O.S.H.H
To define & list the key features of COSHH
Define 10 terms associated with hazardous substances
Explain the employer and employee obligations associated with COSHH
Complete a sample of a COSHH file for common household substances
Recite 2 golden rules when dealing with chemicals
Review of Lesson Aims
To know about the COSHH file and to follow the advice contained within it!

2 golden rules:

Never change the label or use a container for storing something different (from what is shown on the label).

Be aware of the dangers to your service users if they came into contact with the substance (consuming it, inhaling it or if it touches their skin).
EMPLOYEES RESPONSIBILITIES
What do you think your responsibilities are? - Write your answer on a wipe board & hold it up after I count 3!
EMPLOYEES RESPONSIBILITIES
Activity
Look at the examples of products provided
and complete the COSHH table. Use the
following headings:
EMPLOYERS RESPONSIBILITIES
Hazardous substances should be labelled appropriately
Contents should match name on container.
Container should have a use by date.
There should be instructions on how to use the substance safely.
The length of storage time from opening should be given.
COSHH - LABELLING
Correct storage of chemicals:
All substances should be stored in a safe place.
Storage area should be locked.
Chemicals should be kept in appropriate
containers
Containers must have safety lids and caps
COSHH - STORAGE
Activity
Look at the examples of hazardous
characteristics. Do you know the meaning
of each one?

You can use the dictionaries provided.
COSHH 2002
The law is designed to ensure employers control exposure to hazardous substances in the work place.

What substances might you find in;
a nursery?
a hospital?
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH) Regulations 2002
To define & list the key features of COSHH
Define 10 terms associated with hazardous substances
Explain the employer and employee obligations associated with COSHH
Complete a sample of a COSHH file for common household substances
Recite 2 golden rules when dealing with chemicals
Lesson Aims
Please switch off your phone to help maintain a positive learning environment and show respect for your class mates!!
Your phone should be in your bag - and put your bag on the floor.
Is your mobile phone switched off?

Why is this legislation important? What
would happen if these regulations were not
implemented?
COSHH 2002
ontrol
f
ubstances
azardous to
ealth
C
O
S
H
H
COSHH stands for …….
To define manual handling
To list the problems involved in manual handling
To discuss the 3 main areas involved in the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992.
To describe the DO’S and DON‘TS when manual handling.
Previous Lesson
Unit 3
Health, Safety & Security
Deaths
Major injuries
Over-3-day injuries
Injuries when people are taken from the scene of an accident to hospital
Some work-related diseases
Dangerous occurrences – where something serious happens that does not result in an injury, but could have done
Dangerous gas fittings
When does an employer have to report to the Government?
Employers must report accidents, diseases and dangerous occurrences and deaths to the Health and Safety Executive.
Every workplace should have an accident report form.
The person completing the form should make a detailed note of dates, times, witnesses and treatment necessary.
R.I.D.D.O.R 1995
Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations
(1995)
Read about employer and employee responsibilities on – then apply them to the picture (HOMEWORK IF NOT TIME NOW)
Employer vs. Employee duties
HASWA 1974 applies to all work situations
It covers everyone at work or anyone, such as the general public, who may be visiting the workplace.
HASWA covers all health and safety legislation, providing a safe environment for all employers and employees
Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
By the end of the session students will be
able to :
Identify employers and employees
responsibilities in the workplace
List the information that should be given to
employees before starting work.
Explain the key provisions under HASWA (1974) & RIDDOR (1995)
Know how to respond to an accident
Review of lesson aims
All accidents should be reported to the employer ... but only some have to be reported to the Government.

What is the name of the Government department that receives reports of accidents & incidents?

The Health and Safety Executive
Reporting Accidents (Try to remember this and next slide)

Answer the questions:

What is an accident?
What can happen as a result of an
accident?
All accidents must be reported – Why?
ACCIDENTS
What do these initials stand for?
R.I.D.D.O.R.
Watch the video and answer the questions in your workbook
Risk assessment for young people on work placement
By the end of the session students will be
able to :
Identify employers and employees
responsibilities in the workplace
List the information that should be given to
employees before starting work.
Explain the key provisions under HASWA (1974) & RIDDOR (1995)
Know how to respond to an accident
Aim of session
Please switch off your phone to help maintain a positive learning environment and show respect for your class mates!!
Your phone should be in your bag - and put your bag on the floor.
Is your mobile phone switched off?

Read the case study and complete the accident report form

(NB The trainee social worker injured her left hand resulting in one week off work.)
R.I.D.D.O.R. ACTIVITY
2. An accident is an unplanned and uncontrolled event
3. As a result of an accident people can be killed or suffer serious injury.
Accidents may result in a loss of income for individuals and organisations.
4. Accidents must be reported so that they can be analysed and prevented from happening again
They must be reported for legal reasons as evidence of injury if the employer is to be sued
ACCIDENTS
Complete the card activity – cut out a set and put them into the table (Glue once you have checked them)
Whose responsibility?
In small groups list the health and safety
information that should be provided by an
employer before starting a job in a care home, nursery and hospital
Induction
Unit 3
Health, Safety & Security
To identify the key requirements of the ‘Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999’

To explain the risk assessment process
To carry out a risk assessment
Did you achieve the lesson aims?
Read STEP 2 (page 43)

Complete the next 2 columns of the table
Extent and Likelihood
Think of 7 hazards & write them into the 1st column of the table)


Now say what the risks are (2nd column)
What hazards might there be?
We are going to carry out a risk assessment!
Taking a group of Service Users to the New Pier in Weston
How could the hazards / risks be monitored? – Read step 4 to give you some ideas then complete the final 2 columns in the table
Monitoring & Reassessment

What actions could you take to reduce the hazards / risks? – Complete the next column of the table
Action
Risk Assessment
Requires employers to:
carry out risk assessments
take actions to make things safe
appoint competent people
arrange information and training
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (1999)
The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999

What might this be about?
By the end of the session you will be able to :

Identify the key requirements of the ‘Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999’

Explain the risk assessment process
Carry out a risk assessment
Aims of the lesson
Please switch off your phone to help maintain a positive learning environment and show respect for your class mates!!
Your phone should be in your bag - and put your bag on the floor.
Is your mobile phone switched off?
Moving an object over soft or uneven surfaces requires higher forces.
On an uneven surface, the force needed to start the load moving could increase to 10% of the load weight, although this might be offset to some extent by using larger wheels.
Soft ground may be even worse.
Uneven surfaces
Employees should enlist help from another worker whenever necessary if they have to negotiate a slope or ramp, as pushing and pulling forces can be very high.
For example, if a load of 400 kg is moved up a slope of 1 in 12 (about 5°), the required force is over 30 kg even in ideal conditions - good wheels and a smooth slope.
This is above the guideline weight for men and well above the guideline weight for women.
Slopes
As a rough guide the amount of force that needs to be applied to move a load over a flat, level surface using a well-maintained handling aid is at least 2% of the load weight.
For example, if the load weight is 400 kg, then the force needed to move the load is 8 kg.
Force
Reduce the guideline weights if the handler twists to the side during the operation.
As a rough guide, reduce them by 10% if the handler twists beyond 45°, and by 20% if the handler twists beyond 90°.
Twisting
Examine Load
Plan your route
Squat down
Grasp the object firmly
Lift with your legs
Keep the load close
Turn your feet
ASK FOR HELP
Take the Strain out of Lifting and Carrying
Check that nothing is on the top of load
Test weight by pushing load
Stand as close to load as possible
Grasp load firmly, sliding it down your body
Use mechanical assistance or get help
Good Handling Technique –
Lifting from a high place
Work with someone of similar height if possible
Choose one person to call signals
Lift from the hip together and raise to desired level
Move smoothly and together
Good Handling Technique
Teamwork
Good Handling Technique
Task – work routine, trolleys, distance

Individual – information, training

Load – make it lighter, smaller, stable

Environment – clear routes, space
Reduce the risk of injury
Does it need to be done?
Can it be automated or mechanised?
Avoid
Avoid hazardous manual handling operations so far as is reasonably practicable;

Assess any hazardous manual handling operations that cannot be avoided;

Reduce the risk of injury so far as is reasonably practicable.
Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992
Risk assessment
(1) Every employer shall make a suitable and sufficient assessment of -
(a) the risks to the health and safety of his employees to which they are exposed whilst they are at work; and
(b) the risks to the health and safety of persons not in his employment arising out of or in connection with the conduct by him of his undertaking,
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992
Health & Safety Law
Strains & Sprains – Muscles & joints injured by over-exertion
Hernias – Ruptures of abdominal walls
Fractures – Dropping loads
Wounds – Cuts & abrasions
Types of Manual Handling Injuries
Injury Statistics 2001/02
Over 38%

of over-3-day accidents in the last five years have been due to lifting, handling and carrying.
The Health & Safety Executive estimate that over 5 million days are lost annually because of manual handling injuries, costing industry over £5 Billion
Why Bother with Manual Handling?
MANUAL HANDLING TRAINING COURSE
Questions?
Pushing and Pulling
Lighten the load
Stand on something sturdy, with one foot in front of other, unless using a stepladder
Use a mechanical aid or get help if load awkward or heavy
Good Handling Technique –
Lifting to a high place
General risk assessment guidelines
If precise positioning of the load is necessary, put it down first, then slide it into the desired position.
Put down, then adjust
Especially while the back is bent.
Shoulders should be kept level and facing in the same direction as the hips.
Turning by moving the feet is better than twisting and
lifting at the same time.
Avoid twisting
At the start of the lift, slight bending of the back, hips and knees is preferable to fully flexing the back (stooping) or fully flexing the hips and knees (squatting).
Don’t flex the back any further while lifting. This can happen if the legs begin to straighten before starting to raise the load.
Start in a good posture
The feet should be apart with one leg slightly forward to maintain balance (alongside the load, if it is on the ground).
The worker should be prepared to move their feet during the lift to maintain their stability.
Avoid tight clothing or unsuitable footwear, which may make this difficult.
Get a good hold. Where possible the load should be hugged as close as possible to the body. This may be better than gripping it tightly with hands only.
Adopt a stable position.
Keep the load close to the body for as long as possible while lifting.
Keep the heaviest side of the load next to the body.
If a close approach to the load is not possible, try to slide it towards the body before attempting to lift it.
Keep the load close to the waist
Plan the lift. Can handling aids be used?
Where is the load going to be placed?
Will help be needed with the load?
Remove obstructions such as discarded wrapping materials.
For a long lift, consider resting the load midway on a table or bench to change grip.
Think before lifting/handling
Load – heavy, unwieldy, slippery, sharp

Individual – health issues, pregnancy, PPE

Task – pushing, time, distance, teamwork

Environment – Floor, lighting, surfaces
Assess
Section 2 - General duties of employers to their employees
“It shall be the duty of every employer to ensure so far as is reasonably practicable the health, safety and welfare at work of all his employees”.
The Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974

Common Law – Duty of Care
Criminal Law – Acts & Regulations
Health & Safety Law
Transporting
or
supporting
of a
load
, including lifting, putting
down, pushing, pulling, carrying or
moving by hand or by bodily force
What is Manual Handling?
Objectives

To examine accident statistics associated with manual handling, common injuries and causes

To outline the legislative requirements in respect of manual handling

To examine handling kinetics
Aims

The course aims to provide a basic knowledge of how back/shoulder/neck problems arise and how to reduce the risk of injury
Aims & Objectives
Look ahead, not down at the load, once it has been held securely.
Move smoothly. The load should not be jerked or snatched as this can make it harder to keep control and can increase the risk of injury.
Keep the head up when handling.
Pass criteria command verb

Outline – Write a clear description but not a detailed one. You need to state what must, or must not, be done to comply with the various laws and regulations, and to work within policies and procedures.

Merit criteria command verb

Describe – Give a clear description that includes all the relevant features. Think of it as ‘painting a picture’ with words
Health and Safety at Work Act (Laura Bellworthy & Leah)
Food Safety Act (Eloise & Laura Beattie)
Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations (Chloe , Gemma & Jade)
Manual Handling Operations Regulations (Hope, Jake & Becky H)
Reporting of Injuries (Sophie & Beth)
Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) (Stephanie & Becky A)
Data Protection Act (Emily & Stacey)
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (Hollie, Sarah & Charlotte M)
Care Homes Regulations (Lewis & Kerri )
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) (Rhia & Caragh)
Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (Tori, Ella & Charlee)
Care Minimum Standards (various supplements) (Tiff & Charlotte S)
Legislation relating to health and safety (group A)

Each group is going to be given a piece of legislation.

You will have one session research it and create a presentation on PowerPoint.

Make sure you outline what the legislation is, what it does and how its has an influence on health and social care settings. It needs to be good as the information given will be shared with your class to help them with the assignment.
Legislation Task
P2
Outline how legislation, policies and procedures relating to health, safety and security influence health and social care settings.

M1
Describe how health and safety legislation, policies and procedures promote the safety of individuals in a health or social care setting.
Linked to criteria...
P2, M1
Unit 3 Health, Safety and Security in Health and Social Care

2.1 Know how Legislation, Guidelines, Policies and Procedures Promote Health, Safety and Security
Make sure you are making notes and asking questions at the end.

Remember to respect each other and listen to each others presentations

NO MOBILE PHONES!!!!
Presentations
Health and Safety at Work Act (Sam & Izzy)
Food Safety Act (Nicole Bou, Alannah & Charlotte )
Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations (Nicole Br & Jess)
Manual Handling Operations Regulations (Kelsey & Hannah)
Reporting of Injuries (Sophie & Rosie)
Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) (Chili & Nathaniel)
Data Protection Act (Ellen& Sarah)
Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations (Leanna & Emma)
Care Homes Regulations (Cassie, Danielle & Roxy)
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) (Emily F & Robyn)
Civil Contingencies Act 2004 (Emily L & Denitsa)
Care Minimum Standards (various supplements) (Laura & Lisa)
Legislation relating to health and safety (group B)
Legislation – Sets out the proposals for new laws, and plans to change existing laws, that are presented for debate before Parliament.

Guidelines – A statement by which to determine a course of action. A guideline aims to streamline particular processes according to a set routine or sound practice.

Policies – A principle or rule to guide decisions and achieve rational outcome(s).

Procedures – A series of actions which have to be executed in the same manner in order to always obtain the same result under the same circumstances.
What is the difference?

Identify the meaning of legislation, guidelines, policies and procedures

Research a piece of legislation

Create a Presentation about a piece of legislation

Present back to the group
Session Objectives
Turn your phone off and put it in your bag.
Remember...
Group Task
Identifying and calculating risks

You need to consider all aspects of health and safety: identifying who may be at risk, the possible outcomes of carrying out various tasks and any precautions that should be taken.

1. Identify the possible hazards in each situation.
2. give a point value to the risk involved: 1 = very little risk of injury, up to 5 = extreme risk, possibly fatal
Risk assessments
Spot the Health & Safety faults
Charles C Ebbets's famous 1932 original, Lunch a top a Skyscraper
Safety harness, Safety boots, High vis jackets, Hard hat, ?
Charles C Ebbets's famous 1932 original, Lunch a top a Skyscraper
Safety gloves, Ear defenders, High vis jackets, Hard hat
Safety harness, Safety boots, High vis jackets, Hard hat,?
Sporting Activity Hazards
Indoor Hazards
Indoor Hazards
Indoor Hazards
http://moodle.sgscol.ac.uk/safetyCare/files/manualHandling.html
Safety Care - Manual Handling video
Fire Extinguishers & Safety Signs
Lesson aims
Recognise different types of fire extinguishers and safety signs in a health and social care setting
Safety Signs activity
Safety Signs around the college
Look up the meanings and write the type and meaning under each sign.
In pairs/small groups take photos of safety signs around the college.

How many different types of signs can you find?
Learning aims

Understand what a risk assessment is
Complete a risk assessment form
http://moodle.sgscol.ac.uk/safetyCare/files/synopsis/ra.html
Risk Assessment Video
Risk Assessment questions
Student activity

Questions booklet: Risk assessments
Sample risk assessment
Classroom egg game
You need to be able to show that:
A proper check was made;
You asked who might be affected;
You dealt with all the obvious significant hazards, taking into account the number of people who could be involved;
The precautions are reasonable, and the remaining risk is low
Step 4: Record significant findings
Employees are the main group, but don’t forget:
Young workers, trainees, new and expectant mothers etc. may be at particular risk;
Cleaners, visitors, contractors, maintenance workers etc. who may not be in the workplace all the time; and
Members of the public, or people you share a workplace with if there is a chance they could be hurt by your activities.
Step 2: Decide who can be harmed
A careful examination of what could cause harm to people, so that you can weigh up whether you have taken enough precautions or should do more.
The aim is to make sure that no one gets hurt or becomes ill.
It is a legal requirement.
Risk Assessment - What Is It?
Questions?
Risk assessment is a legal requirement
Follow the “5 steps to Risk Assessment”;
Identify the hazards
Decide who can be harmed
Evaluate the risk
Record significant findings
Review and revise
Risk assessment is a means to an end, not an end in itself - the aim is to keep people safe, not have good paperwork
Summary
Sooner or later, new machines, substance or procedures will be introduced which could lead to new hazards
If there is any significant change, add to the assessment to take account of the new hazard
Don’t amend the assessment for every trivial change
It is good practice to review the assessment from time to time to ensure precautions are still working effectively
Step 5: Review
If you employ five or more people then you must record the significant findings of your assessment
This means recording the significant hazards and conclusions
You must also tell your employees about your findings
Step 4: Record significant findings
Some risks have already been assessed:
If, for example, you have already assessed the risks from hazardous substances and have taken necessary precautions, you do not have to repeat this information
Common Problems
Sharing a workplace:
Tell the other employers and self-employed people there about any risks your work could cause them, and what precautions you are taking.
Also think about the risks to your own workforce from those who share your workplace
Common Problems
Variation of work; Employees who move from one site to another:
Identify the hazards you can reasonably expect and assess the risks from them. After that, if additional hazards are spotted when you get to site, get information from others on site, and take what action seems necessary
Common Problems
Try a less risky option
Prevent access to the hazard (e.g. by guarding)
Organise work to reduce exposure to the hazard
Issue personal protective equipment
Provide welfare facilities (e.g. washing facilities to remove contamination, first aid etc.
Principles of Prevention
The aim is to make all risks small
In taking action, the aim is:
a.) Get rid of the hazard altogether
b.) Control the risk so that harm is unlikely
When controlling risks, you need to follow the “principles of prevention”
Step 3: Evaluate the risk
Consider how likely it is that each hazard could cause you harm
Even after all precautions have been taken, some risk usually remains
Decide for each significant hazard whether this remaining risk is high, medium or low
Have you done all the things the law requires you to do?
Are there industry standards?
Step 3: Evaluate the risk
Walk around the workplace and look afresh at would could cause harm
Ignore the trivial, and concentrate on significant hazards
Ask your employees what they think
Use manufacturers instructions or data
Refer to accident/incident records
Step 1: Identify the hazards
1. Look for and list the hazards
2. Decide who might be harmed and how
3. Evaluate risks arising from hazards and decide whether existing controls are adequate
4. Record the findings
5. Review assessment when necessary
5 Steps to Risk Assessment
Identify all hazards
Identify specific regulations
Systematic approach
Include non-routine operations
Identify who is at risk
Take existing control measures into
account
What Is “Suitable & Sufficient”?
“The likelihood of harm resulting from a hazard”

Risk = Severity x Probability
What is Risk?
By the end of this presentation you will know:
Revise what a risk assessment is
Understand where the need for risk assessment comes from
Understand principles behind carrying out a risk assessment.
Complete risk assessment
Objectives
Risk Assessments
Keep the record for future reference or use - it can help if an Inspector asks what precautions you have taken or if you become involved in any action for civil liability
You can refer to other documents (e.g. manuals, H&S policy, company rules, manufacturers instructions etc.). These may already list hazards and precautions - there is no need to repeat all that.
Step 4: Record significant findings
Legal duty on employers to carry out risk assessments as first step in ensuring safe and healthy workplace
Written record (5 or more employees)
Identify preventive and protective measures
Review assessments if no longer valid
Risk assessments must be “Suitable and Sufficient”
Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999
Health & Safety At Work Etc Act 1974
General duty to ensure health, safety and welfare at work of all employees so far as is reasonably practicable.
The Legal Position
Examples: Electricity, Hazardous substances, Working at Heights, Vehicles.
“Something with the potential to cause harm”
What is a Hazard?
Sample risk assessment
The Egg Game
Lesson aims
Look at different examples of risk assessments
Carry out own risk assessment for activity in college
Risk assessments
Health hazards - These include incidents leading to illness.
Safety hazards - These include incidents leading to personal injury or damage to equipment or buildings.
Security hazards - These include intruders, theft of property or information, and individuals either being abducted or leaving without consent.
Full transcript