Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM


Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.


Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks


No description

Richard Kreinbring

on 27 January 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of MCTE

Feedback Presentation

Your Friendly Neighborhood Presenters:
Is Giving Effective Feedback a Teachable Skill?
What is it?
How do I give it?

Effective feedback...
the person what they did right and wrong. Ok, sure but how does that translate into helping the person get better at the thing they a trying to do?
For me, it looked like this. It was almost always after the fact, already graded. It wasn't really feedback so much as a post mortim of what went wrong.
What is feedback? It seems like a simple question, right? When I started this project I would have said I knew what it was, but when we changed the question to what is
feedback then things got dicey for me. Most of the feedback I gave came at the end of the process and while I allowed the students to redo work mostly what they did was make corrections. They learned what they did wrong, but that's not the same as learning how to write.
What I want feedback to be is a dialogue between the audience and the writer about how the writing is working. Are the parts--the rhetorical moves--doing what the writer thinks they're doing? Is she being deliberate in her writing?

As soon as my students see me as their audience the relationship changes.
Teach the audience--the students themselves how to give good feedback to each other.

Now I'm back to my question. What does that look like?

I asked my students to think about a time that they learned something new or how to do something better. We talked about that process and what we found was that feedback that was effective shared some qualities:

So, what makes feedback effective?
-what exactly did I do?
Find the place where I did it right so I can do it again or wrong so I can fix it.
what can I do? It has to be real. "Make this clearer", or "warrant better" are not actionable unless you tell me how.
The longer I have to wait for that feedback the less likely I am to be able to use it.

Uses Vocabulary Specific to the Discipline-i
f we are learning music, let’s talk like musicians, writers like writers. (This one is a little artificial, but one of the things I try to get from my students is to talk a good game. I think people who talk the talk are more likely to understand whole thing.)
Talk about feedback.
Define its properties.
Look at examples.
Be prepared to have your students complain about the lack of quality feedback from their college peers.
Using multiple ways to offer feedback: combining digital and face-to-face conversations
Whose feedback do students trust?
Students going rogue
Creating agented learners
Quality feedback
depends on a
purposeful context.
In this text, it revolved around the idea of freedom of speech and what it means to this writer. As it went more in depth, it touch on a more political or controversial side of this right. I really liked how you mentioned your concerning thought about this issue and the questions that came up while researching this issue. In my opinion, I think the reflection of rights had more emphasis, this piece really shared how the writer felt and what questions came up with a little information to back it up.

This was about the truth of the Armenian Genocide and how the Turkish government does not acknowledge it as a genocide but tries to embrace the Armenians heritage and give the Armenians rights that they are guaranteed. It was also about freedom of speech and its importance in the Armenian fight to have this story heard and finally get closure. I saw two view points the Armenians and the Turks. This piece is definitely pro first amendment and it talks about how people "must be free to speak". From what I read, I can see that freedom of speak is important because it helps the Armenians get justice from the Turks after a whopping one hundred years. I think, based on the way the essay was organized, the essay emphasized on both information and reflection on rights. You can clearly see that there is a shift from information to video when you add in your own opinion. For example, "I personally believe that..." Although the Turks are in the wrong for not acknowledging the genocide, it would be interesting to see why they do not acknowledge it. Besides the fact that it would give them a bad reputation, you can try to include may be the political aspect. For example, if they did acknowledge the genocide would the Turkish relationship with other nations change. Sorry it was so long, but this was a very good post and it made me want to say a lot and so I did.

The riots are a good topic to write about because of how well it relates to the first amendment. Were there any more amendments that you could have related this topic to? The rights have more emphasis in your writing which is a good thing in my opinion because the rights are more important than the reflections.

1) The right is that people are given freedom of expression, and are allowed to express themselves freely. Your example, same sex marriage is a good example because this is a big topic in our world, and is not fair. People that don't like it, that's there opinion.. i don't understand why there opinions matter. Relating to religion is a good viewpoint too, to support your side on this topic. 2) Reflections on rights was more emphasized. Relating this topic to your own opinion and other peoples viewpoint like religion was very helpful with understanding. What can we do to change this though? I would give more ways to help stop this, or add organizations and groups that are doing things to stop this.

By Billy saying "so it goes" whenever he hears someone dies, could be a more then just a saying, it could be the thing keeping him alive, almost like a good luck charm

Task: Teach Feedback
Costa and Garmston --
1) Reflective Questioning
2) Non-judgemental Data
3) Inferences, Causality, and Interpretations
4) Personal Opinions and Preferences
5) Evaluations and Judgements

Takeaway: Good feedback is good when it speaks to the writer. Comments are helpful when writers see how to connect the comment to their purpose.
Task: Purpose develops out of a sense of community.

Some Effective Feedback Prompts: Less is More.

Give the writer a point by point summary of the information, viewpoints, and reflections in the essay. Based on the way the essay is organized, which has more emphasis, the information or the reflections? Explain your reasoning..

In your own words, summarize the ideas the writer explained, including how the group discussion added to those ideas, and how the ideas he or she started with connected to other ideas in the book. Give no more than two pieces of advice for what the writer could have done to help you more easily summarize these ideas.

Working sentence by sentence, generate as many questions as you can about the draft as you read.

Takeaway: Writers who learn to respond carefully to others are able to participate and take ownership of a process with which they identify, rather than viewing the tasks of reading and writing as isolated activities.
Here's an example of one reviewer showing her partner how to accomplish the move. Feedback works best when it is paired with someone showing how to do it. The reviewer has to recognize the writer's purpose, comment on the effectiveness of the writing and demonstrate a way to do it.
Rick Kreinbring
Avondale High School
Auburn Hills Michigan
The End?


Laura Mahler
Clarkston High School
Derek Miller
Royal Oak High School
Royal Oak, MI
Write about a time when you were taught how to do something.
What happened?
What did that teaching look like when you learning it?
How about when it wasn't going well.
Write-5 minutes.
Turn and Talk 2 minutes each
Opening Exercise
To Find this presentation:
Go to Prezi.com
Search for the word MCTE

Hey, what's with the stars?
The program we used lets writers rate the feedback that they received. That's another layer of feedback.
Providing feedback at the end of the process taught my students to write for me but only me.
I gave them lots of rubrics which they read as blueprints.
[Side Bar]
I'm not anti-rubric but the way I was using them was undermining what I wanted my students to be able to do.

Start Here!
If you watch kids learning something new you will probably see what good feedback looks like. Go to any playground and you'll see it--lots of small interventions at a lot of points in the process.

I tried to keep that model in my head.
This is probably true of feedback as well. Giving good feedback seems to produce better writers.
Dear Mr. Kreinbring and Mrs. Allan,

When I was in my writing class this semester I found it very frustrating because we would use Eli Review and no one gave me back good feedback. In the comment boxes they would only write me a sentence and some people who gave me feedback would comment sounds good or needs work. They would never explain why it was good or what needed to be improved. In fact, this didn’t help me with my essay at all because I didn’t know what needed to be changed throughout my paper. Also, what’s the point of feedback if no one gives anyone good feedback. When I was peer reviewing a couple of my classmates, I wrote paragraphs and in thorough detail explained what didn’t make sense, what worked and what didn’t work and what needed to be fixed. In the end, I don’t think a lot of people were taught how to give good feedback while peer reviewing other classmate’s papers.

Megan Denis
Shameless Plugs:


Full transcript