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"Never Marry a Mexican"

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by

Kristan Clark

on 26 November 2013

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Transcript of "Never Marry a Mexican"


"Never Marry a Mexican"
By: Sandra Cisneros
A presentation by Michelle Pointer, Erika Garcia, Eva Bolin, AND KRISTAN clark

Centers on a Mexican American woman named Clemencia.
In the first half of the story, Clemencia tells of her mother and father, and how her mother used to tell her, “Never marry a Mexican.”
These words of caution become an anthem for Clemencia later in her life, when she chooses to only become involved with white men, particularly married ones.
One such man is Drew, an older man who a nineteen year old Clemencia falls in love with.
When Drew leaves her to be with his wife, Clemencia waits for his son to become a teenager, so that she can sleep with him and break his heart in revenge against his father
The Story
Clemencia
Adult Life
Motivation in being involved with white, married men
Guilt and sense of justification
Attack on her lover's wife
A diversion from her guilt and fear of losing herself
Meaning behind the story
Making peace and finding middle ground
Any Questions?
Sandra Cisneros
Best Selling Novel
First Work

Born December 20th 1954
Mother was a Mexican American
Father was a Mexican
Moved back and forth from Mexico and Chicago multiple times


Cisneros's first
collection of poems
2002 Best Selling Novel
First Collection of short stories
Home to "Never Marry a Mexican"
Early Life
Her parents' differing cultural views
Torn between two worlds
Parents' marriage
Attempting to cling to her Latino culture
Resentment towards American culture
View on her niche in the world
Straddling two cultures
Clemencia
Common Themes
The Story and Mexican American Culture
Key Quotes
"Never marry a Mexican, my ma said once and always. She said this because of my father. She said this though she was Mexican too. But she was born here in the U.S., and he was born there, and it's not the same, you know."
Her parents are the same color and race, but that does not mean that their culture and how they were raised are the same or anywhere close.
Key Quote
"I'll never marry. Not any man. I've known men too intimately. I've witnessed their infidelities, and I've helped them to it."
She learned that should would never be happy with anyone, because of her experiences with men.
Key Quote
"Did you tell him, while his mother lay on her back laboring his birth, I lay in his mother's bed making love to you?"
She sleeps with the father than with the son
KEY QUOTE
"That boy, your son...The boy red-freckled like fish food floating on the skin of water. That boy."
Expressing anger and the relationship is revenge
Key Quote
"And if I killed someone on a night like this?...I'd be walking with my head full of images and my back to the guilty...Except it's not me who I want to kill..."
Clemencia expresses insanity when she states this, but it is doubtful she will ever kill anyone. She is being expressive and imaginative.
Key Quote
"Good or bad, I've done what I had to do and need to. And you've answered the phone, and startled me away like a bird."
This shows that she is doubting her actions and she is madly in love with a man she can never have, because he is already married.
Conclusion
Full transcript