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What is Irony?

Irony
by

J. Markman

on 21 September 2014

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Transcript of What is Irony?

HOW DO YOU KNOW IF WHAT YOU
ARE READING IS IRONY OR NOT?

WHAT IS IRONY?
DEFINITION
OF IRONY
DEFINITION OF
SITUATIONAL IRONY
SITUATIONAL IRONY
EXAMPLE
DRAMATIC IRONY
EXAMPLE
Irony is
a figure of speech in which words are used in such a way that their intended meaning is different from the actual meaning of the words. It may also be a situation that may end up in quite a different way than what is generally anticipated. In simple words, it is a difference between the appearance and the reality.
DEFINITION OF
DRAMATIC IRONY
An occasion in a play, film, or other work in which a character's words or actions convey a meaning unperceived by the character but understood by the audience.
VERBAL IRONY - EXAMPLE
DEFINITION OF
VERBAL IRONY
A trope (or figure of speech) in which the intended meaning of a statement differs from the meaning that the words appear to express.
An occasion in which the outcome is significantly different from what was expected or considered appropriate.
If the president of Microsoft, Bill Gates, were to win a contest whose grand prize was a computer system, the irony would be situational because such a circumstance would appear ridiculous or "funny" for a number of reasons. Bill Gates doesn't need a computer, he runs the world's largest software company, and he's filthy rich, so winning a computer seems silly and "ironic".
As an audience member, you realize that if a character walks into an abandoned warehouse, chances are a killer is waiting... but because you are a member of the audience you cannot disclose the information to the character.
"The cake is as soft as concrete" - the person wants to tell that the cake is not so soft to eat.
"Water is as clear as mud" - The person actually says that the water is not at all clear.
"Isn't it as pleasant as a root canal?" - This implies that whatever occurred was not pleasant at all.
Full transcript