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The Soul has Bandaged Moments- Emily Dickinson

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Alila Quackenbush

on 12 May 2015

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Transcript of The Soul has Bandaged Moments- Emily Dickinson

The Soul has Bandaged moments- (360)
By: Emily Dickinson
The Soul Has Bandaged Moments
She was born on December 10, 1830, in Amherst, Massachusetts. Dickinson left school as a teenager to live a reclusive life on the family homestead. There, she filled notebooks with poetry and wrote hundreds of letters. Dickinson's poems were published after her death—on May 15, 1886, and she is now considered one of the greatest American poets.
Format of the Poem
There are six stanzas
The number of lines per stanza goes:
4
6
4
4
4
2
There are a total of 126 words in the poem
1st Stanza
The Soul has Bandaged moments -

When too appalled to stir -

She feels some ghastly Fright come up

And stop to look at her -

Gothic Style
The Gothic style is often dark and melodramatic. Usually it involves the use of death or love as a major theme in that work of literature. In "The Soul Has Bandaged Moments", the theme of "a love that cannot be" (she is trapped and can't obtain the freedom that she loves) is expressed and is a proponent of Gothic style.
5th and 6th Stanzas
The final two stanzas are connected in a way which is different from the rest of the poem which did not continue the rhyming pattern after each stanza. The rhyme scheme is A-B-C-B-D-B across the the final two which is different from the scheme altering with every line. The poem then finishes with slant rhyme in the form of "tongue".
The Soul has Bandaged moments- (360)
Emily Dickinson
Metaphor for constriction of depression
cacophonous words create dark mood
cacophonous- goes along with gothic style
Summary
The poem is broken up into 3 sections, 1st and 2nd stanzas are about her constraints and "horrors"
The 3rd and 4th stanzas are moments of escape and freedom.
The 5th and 6th stanzas go back to the fear and pain.
2nd Stanza
3rd Stanza
Line two contains iambic trimeter.
Line three contains iambic tetrameter.
Line four contains iambic trimeter.
The first line contains iambic tetrameter.
The Soul has Bandaged moments -
When too appalled to stir -
She feels some ghastly Fright come up
And stop to look at her -

Salute her, with long fingers -
Caress her freezing hair -
Sip, Goblin, from the very lips
The Lover - hovered - o'er -
Unworthy, that a thought so mean
Accost a Theme - so - fair -

The soul has moments of escape -
When bursting all the doors -
She dances like a Bomb, abroad,
And swings opon the Hours,

As do the Bee - delirious borne -
Long Dungeoned from his Rose -
Touch Liberty - then know no more -
But Noon, and Paradise

The Soul's retaken moments -
When, Felon led along,
With shackles on the plumed feet,
And staples, in the song,

The Horror welcomes her, again,
These, are not brayed of Tongue -
4th Stanza
Salute her, with long fingers -

Caress her freezing hair -

Sip, Goblin, from the very lips

The Lover - hovered - o'er -

Unworthy, that a thought so mean

Accost a Theme - so - fair -
Personifies the
soul as a her
Use of the word
Goblin adds to
the dark mood
of the poem
Use of dashes creates division and pauses when reading, adds to the dramatic and dark mood
Works Cited
www.biography.com www.english.illinois.edu
literatureintranslation.about.com
The soul has moments of escape -
When bursting all the
doors
-
She dances like a
B
omb, abroad,
And
swings opon
the
Hours.


As do the
B
ee - delirious borne -
Long
D
ungeoned from his
R
ose -
Touch
Liberty
- then know no more -
But
Noon, and Paradise
In this poem the "soul" is a w0man in love. This woman feels trapped and unable to escape. At times she has chances to be free, but not for very long without having second thought.
the two stanzas
Slant rhyme, connects
- capitalization of B in bomb and H in hours emphasizes the limited time for freedom
-no rhyme scheme in the stanza
- "Bee" and "Rose" are being emphasized with the capital letters. They connect to nature and the freedom that it has.
-no rhyme scheme
- dashes indicate the freedom continuing and the last line does not have a dash, perhaps showing an end to the freedom.
The underlined words are capitalized because they refer to people. The soul refers to the woman, and the others refer to death
Full transcript