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Culture in the Workplace: India

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Shari Bissoondatt

on 13 November 2013

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Transcript of Culture in the Workplace: India

Culture in the Workplace: India
Overview

India/U.S.A
Geographic Location
India's geographic Location was highly important in a historical context, because it allowed the East to connect with the West.
Silk Road
Spice Trade
Indus Valley & Aryan Culture
The Indus Valley was suspected to be highly matriarchal, while the Aryan culture was more patriarchal.
After the Aryans invaded the Indus Valley, patriarchy won out.
The Aryan Culture gave rise to Hinduism, which later formed the foundations for other Eastern Religions like Buddhism.

British Rule
India had been under the rule of many dynasties and countries throughout its history. However the British rule, which began in 1610, heavily impacted the political and economical context of India today.
Raj Treaty.


General Social Customs
Indian Society is very hierarchical. Things like level of education, social class and gender influences where someone is placed on the hierarchical scale.
Family and community are very important.
Indians do not like to say "no," because it brings about negative energy.
Indians have a laid back view of time.

Use of Time
India:
More hours worked, but not spent necessarily spent directly on work.
Longer lunches, more breaks.
Staying 12 hours at work is not uncommon.
Depending on workplace, social media sites are acceptable. If they are not, other recreational diversions are provided.

High Vs. Low Context / Conversational Style
U.S.A- Low Context
Verbal responses leave little ambiguity.
Direct answers are often the norm.
India- High Context
Responses are more open ended and designed to avoid confrontation.
Negotiations are often slow and take many levels into account.
Transactions are not based strictly on statistics, but involve intuition, faith and feel.

Individualistic Vs. Collectivist Culture
U.S.A- Individualistic Culture
Power is seen as important.
India- Collectivist Culture
Relationships with family members and the community are seen as important.
Gender Differences
Despite the right to education act, Pew Global Attitudes Project showed that India is still a male dominated society in regards to education and the workplace.
When Jobs are scarce, men should have more right to a job:
84% of Indians said YES, 14% of Americans did
A university education is more important to a man than a woman:
63% of Indians agreed, 15% of Americans did.
In both questions, India had the highest amount of agreement among countries surveyed.

(2013, February 24). Retrieved from http://thekularingtradeblog.com/2013/02/24/five-key-trade-routes-from-history/

(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.geographia.com/india/india02.htm
(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/india-country-profile.html

(n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.globalbasecamps.com/blog/know-you-go-cultural-norms-india
(n.d.). Retrieved from http://redbus2us.com/work-culture-ethics-time-at-work-importance-india-vs-america/
(n.d.). Retrieved from •http://indiahorizonz.com/business-etiquette-for-india-a-primer/
Konsky, C., Eguchi, M., Blue, J., & Kapoor, S. (1999). Individualist-collectivist values: American, indian and japanese. International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies, 9(1), 69-83.
Remez, M. (2013, January 4). Indians support gender equality but still give men edge in workplace, higher education . Retrieved from http://www.pewglobal.org/2013/01/04/indians-support-gender-equality-but-still-give-men-edge-in-workplace-higher-education/
Bibliography
http://thekularingtradeblog.com/2013/02/24/five-key-trade-routes-from-history/
www.geographia.com/india/india02.htm
http://www.globalbasecamps.com/blog/know-you-go-cultural-norms-india
http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/resources/global-etiquette/india-country-profile.html
http://redbus2us.com/work-culture-ethics-time-at-work-importance-india-vs-america/
http://indiahorizonz.com/business-etiquette-for-india-a-primer/
Konsky, C., Eguchi, M., Blue, J., & Kapoor, S. (1999). Individualist-collectivist values: American, indian and japanese. International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies, 9(1), 69-83.
Remez, M. (2013, January 4). Indians support gender equality but still give men edge in workplace, higher education . Retrieved from http://www.pewglobal.org/2013/01/04/indians-support-gender-equality-but-still-give-men-edge-in-workplace-higher-education/
http://forbesindia.com/blog/business-strategy/why-indian-women-leave-the-workforce/
www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/newsrooms/comment-analysis/WCMS_204762/
Mahajan, E. (2012, June 18). Social media in the workplace. The Times of India. Retrieved from timesofindia.indiatimes.com
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U.S.A:
Ruled by the clock.
Working longer than scheduled hours is seen as bad for you.
Short lunch breaks, usually at the desk.

Mahajan, E. (2012, June 18). Social media in the workplace. The Times of India. Retrieved from timesofindia.indiatimes.com
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