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The Great Gatsby: Chapter 6

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Jack Sieger

on 21 January 2014

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Transcript of The Great Gatsby: Chapter 6

The Great Gatsby: Chapter 6
Jack Sieger, Itamar Patek, Brandon Courtney, Mick Torres
Main Characters
Nick Carraway
Jay Gatsby (James Gatz)
Daisy
Details
Imagery
Diction
Language
Tone
Structure
Higher level thinking:Q1
Higher Level Thinking:Q5
-Narrator, very honest and tolerant of the drama which surrounds him. Seems to become more acquainted with Jay Gatsby, though he often finds himself being a miracle worker for him.
-Lives in West Egg

"I stayed late that night, Gatsby asked me to wait until he was free, and I lingered in the garden until the inevitable swimming party had run up,"(110)
Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby, Daisy, Dan Cody, Tom Buchanan
-Born James Gatz, educated at St. Olaf's
-Became interested in gaining wealth after meeting Dan Cody
-Protagonist, Very wealthy man who owns a mansion in West Egg, Nick Carraway's neighbor.

"To the young Gatz, resting on his oars and looking up at the railed deck, that yacht represented all the beauty and glamour in the world."(101)
-Nick's cousin, the woman who Gatsby has fallen in love with.
Very social, married to Tom Buchanan.
-Kind and appreciative

"I've never met so many celebrities," Daisy exclaimed. "I liked that man, what was his name?"(106)
"I like her, I think she's lovely."(108)




-The Different combinations of the 5 senses forces the reader to live the character's surroundings.
-You can really see how Gatsby's father business ran.
- The use of sensory details ties the reader into the setting of the story at the time.

" He was a son of God—a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that—and he must be about His Father’s business, the service of a vast, vulgar, and meretricious beauty. "
Dan Cody

-Wealthy copper mogul
-Warned by James (Gatsby) of a coming storm on his yacht.
-Renamed James and took him aboard his yacht
-Dies and leaves Gatsby the goal of becoming wealthy.

"Cody was fifty years old then, a product of the Nevada silver fields, of the Yukon, of every rush for metal since seventy-five." (100)
Tom Buchanan
-The way that Fitzgerald describes Gastby's past as well as his thought about himself give the reader a clear picture of what to expect in him in chapter 6.
-By using this amount of detail, it gives the reader a sense of closure by knowing what to expect out of the characters.
-Fitzgerald use of incorporating sensory and specific detail when describing physical features of characters and the setting of the situations of chapter 6.

"The truth was that Jay Gatsby, of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself."
-Dislikes Gatsby's lack of social grace
-critical of Daisy's frequent visits with Gatsby
-Suspicious of Daisy and Gatsby
-Goes to one of Gatsby's parties with Daisy

"They were a party of three on horseback-Tom and a man named Sloane and a pretty woman in a brown riding habit, who had been there previously."(102)
-Fitzgerald's choice of words show the intelligence of the characters as well as herself.
-The use of more sophisticated vocabulary, produces more vivid pictures throughout chapter six.
-It shows us as readers how meaningful a passage really is with Fitzgerald's choice of words.

"...were all Westerners, and perhaps we possessed some deficiency in common which made us subtly unadaptable to Eastern life."
Minor Characters
Mr. Sloane, Mrs. Sloane
-The calm yet inspiring tone of this quote shows us Fitzgerald's way of explaining some of of the situations in chapter 6.
-Yet, in some situations there are very distinct tones depending on the situation the characters are in.

"It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther. . . . And then one fine morning, we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."
-The past referencing in chapter 6 shows us as the readers that this story is told in 3rd person due to the fact that Nick Carraway is narrating Jay Gastby's dilemma through his own eyes.
-Also, the formal use of the text in chapter 6 tells us that Fitzgerald wants us to know Nick is a very intelligent person that speaks in a formal matter to express what he sees throughout his adventures in the story.

"I see now that this has been a story of the West, after all—Tom and Gatsby, Daisy and Jordan and I, were all Westerners, and perhaps we possessed some deficiency in common which made us subtly unadaptable to Eastern life."
-The way that Fitzgerald uses the past tense as a technique to describe what is happening shows us that this is written/spoken in the third person.
-As readers we can see that the way Fitzgerald references back to the past shows us that the past plays a big role in the story's plot line overall.

"So he invented just the sort of Jay Gatsby that a seventeen year old boy would be likely to invent, and to this conception he was faithful to the end."
Chapter 6 Timeline
"About this time an ambitious young reporter from New York arrived one morning at Gatsby's door and asked him if he had anything to say." (Fitzgerald 98)
"James Gatz- that was really, or at least legally, his name." (Fitzgerald 98).
Mr. Sloane
Mrs. Sloane
-Very careless and selfish, does not show respect for hosts.
-Went to Gatsby's for drinks with Tom Buchanan and Mrs. Sloane

"A lemonade? No, thanks. A little champagne? Nothing at all, thanks...I'm sorry."(103)
-Went over to Gatsby's with Mr. Sloane and Tom Buchanan
"We'll all come over to your next party, Mr. Gatsby." she suggested. "What do you say?"(103)
1. What do you think would change if Gatsby had never met Dan Cody?
- I think for Gatsby, Cody was certainly an important part of his life and crucial to his success. However, the man formerly known as James Gatz had great and unstoppable ambition. Even without Mr. Cody, I believe Gatsby would have still found a way to succeed and become rich. Cody only worked as a comfortable stepping-stone to the throws of luxury. Cody never gave Gatsby anything apart from his taste for success.

5. Why is it not enough for Gatsby to have Daisy say she loves him, but also say she never loved Tom?
- Gatsby’s infatuation with Daisy has lasted for over 5 years. In those 5 years Gatsby has yearned for nothing else but to be with her. He now wishes for that length of time to be nothing but a memory, or better yet, a hallucination. To admit that he has finally captured Daisy, Gatsby must see that she has eyes for no other man. Then, and only then, will Gatsby’s quest for Daisy end and he will be at peace.

Higher Level Thinking: Q2
2. Why do you think Mr. Sloan and Tom dislike Gatsby?

Mr. Sloan and Tom are both very wealthy people who live in East Egg. East Egg is comprised of extremely rich people and established wealthy families. Gatsby lives on West Egg, a place where he throws his extravagant parties and where all the rich and famous go. Gatsby is a class of person known as having “new money”. New money is obtained by those who have recently gathered their wealth through business or other means. Mr. Sloan and Tom both have “old money”, or money that runs through the family leading back through generations. These two types clash with each other both claiming theirs is superior to the other.

Higher level thinking:Q3
How would Tom react if he knew the relationship between Daisy and Gatsby at the party?

Tom is a very possessive man that would not take kindly to other men on his wife. He is also an arrogant and a man’s man. I believe Tom would not hesitate to approach Gatsby with physical violence or threaten him as he does in the next chapter. This might cause a confrontation between Gatsby and Tom that would prevent their meeting in front of daisy in the hotel next chapter. It might also cause daisy to not shy away from Gatsby during their quarrel in the next chapter and prevent myrtles death.

Higher level thinking:Q4
Why does Gatsby insist that things be like they were 5 years ago?

Gatsby’s whole life has been dedicated to finding and acquiring Daisy back. He built his name and identity all around the goal of trying to win back Daisy. His mansion, car, and parties are all for her. Now that he has all of these things and can finally get daisy back, he wishes to return things back to the way they were and pretend like he’s always had her.

Important Quotes
“The truth was that Jay Gatsby, of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself. He was a son of God—a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that—and he must be about His Father’s business, the service of a vast, vulgar, and meretricious beauty. So he invented just the sort of Jay Gatsby that a seventeen year old boy would be likely to invent, and to this conception he was faithful to the end.”

Jay Gatsby was not always the successful, charming, well groomed, and courteous gentleman we know him to be. In fact, his real name is James Gat, a farmer’s son, destined to repeat the path of his parents. James, however, would not take this lying down. The ambitious 17 year old decided that he should one day be successful, and so he was. As stated, Gatsby made himself the man he was, and he stayed true to his own vision to the end. Gatsby encompasses all we associate with the American dream. A poor farmer’s son born into nothing works himself into unobtainable success by force of sheer will. Fitzgerald uses Gatsby to demonstrate the growing and wild ideals of the time and show that even those of nothing could become something in the Roaring 20’s.

"An instinct toward his future
glory had led him, some months
before, to the small lutheran
college of St. Olaf."(100)
"Cody was fifty years old then,
a product of the Nevada silver
fields."(100)
"To young Gatz, resting on his
oars and looking up at the railed
deck, that yacht represented all the
beauty and glamour in the world."(100)
"I'm delighted to see you, im delighted that
you dropped in."(102)
"Tom was evidently perturbed at
Daisy's running around alone, for
on the following Saturday night
he came with her to Gatsby's party."(105)

"Who is this Gatsby anyhow? Some big bootlegger?"(109)
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