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Sensory Issues and Challenging Behaviour

A look at how sensory issues impact upon individual's challenging behaviour and how sensory work can help
by

richard hirstwood

on 20 April 2017

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Transcript of Sensory Issues and Challenging Behaviour

Challenging Behaviour
Stress factors
Hormone inputs
Brain development
Adrenaline
Freeze
Sensory Processing
Disorder
Confusion
Sensory work
Sound
Light
Relaxation
Communication
Coping Skills
Self Esteem
What is challenging
behaviour?
“Culturally abnormal behaviour(s) of such an intensity, frequency or duration that the physical safety of the person or others is likely to be placed in serious jeopardy, or behaviour which is likely to seriously limit use of, or result in the person being denied access to, ordinary community facilities.”

Ref: Emerson, 1995, cited in Emerson, E (2001, 2nd edition): Challenging Behaviour: Analysis and intervention in people with learning disabilities. Cambridge University Press
Functional analysis
cortisol
Dopamine
The posh definition
Anything that creates stress
in ourselves or our other
students
extreme sensitivity to
sensory input may
result in higher than
normal
confusion
fear
distress
agitation
avoidance of
activities
Cortisol
Sensory Audit
Touch
Use a range of materials
to help with a desensitising
programme
Rough/smooth
Soft/hard
Reward driven learning
Attention
Seratonin
Happiness
Comprises the brain stem and cerebellum and it is the oldest part of the brain in evolutionary terms.
It is responsible for self preservation, controlling heartbeat, breathing, fight/flight/freeze mechanisms and the need to reproduce.
The mechanisms of aggression are developed here.
“The human brain is the only brain in the biosphere whose potential cannot be realised on its own. It needs to become part of a network before its design features can be expressed.” (p.324)

Merlin Donald (2001) A Mind So Rare. W.W. Norton & Co.
“Our brains co-evolved with culture and are specifically adapted for living in culture – that is, for assimilating the algorithms and knowledge networks of culture.” (p.11)
Comprises 8 different areas in and above the temporal lobes.
It corresponds to the brain of inferior mammals.
It is the centre of emotions, anger, fear, passion, love, hate, joy and sadness originate here.
It is also linked with memory particularly those associated with emotional events.
A part of the Limbic System, the amygdala, gives rise to feelings of fear and anxiety.
Prolonged stress can affect the amygdala and this can be the cause of psychological disorders and phobias.
My Definition
Neo-cortex
generation of motor commands
It is involved in higher functions such as sensory perception
spatial reasoning
conscious thought
and in humans, language
Fight
Flight
Sensory Regulation
Accuity
Processing
Neurological
Thresholds
Self
Regulation
examples of processing problems include optical illusions
Sensory seeking
Sensory defensive
Under responsive
Over stimulation
textured materials/items
"messy" things
vibrating toys, etc.
a hug
a kiss
certain clothing textures
rough or bumpy bed sheets
seams on socks
tags on shirts
light touch
hands or face being dirty
shoes and/or sandals
wind blowing on bare skin
extreme sensitivity to
sensory input may
result in higher than
normal
extreme sensitivity to sensory input may result in higher than normal
Avoidance of activities
Agitation
Distress
Fear
Relaxation
Examples of improving accuity skills
Examples of work to improve self esteem
Clive Smith 2011
Anxiety
Three main areas in behavioural terms
are the hypothalamus, the amygdala
and the hippocampus.
Full transcript