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The History of Civil Rights in the United States

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by

Judy Pierce

on 2 March 2016

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Transcript of The History of Civil Rights in the United States

"I have observed this in my experience of slavery, that whenever my condition was improved, instead of increasing my contentment; it only increased my desire to be free, and set me to thinking of plans to gain my freedom." Fredrick Douglas
In 1865 Congress passed the
13th Amendment
, which outlawed slavery
The
14th Amendment
, passed in 1868, expanded the rights of African Americans, stating that they and their children were United States citizens and should, therefore, be afforded all the rights enjoyed by white citizens.
The
15th Amendment
, passed in 1870, gave black men the right to vote.
"Freedom is never given; it is won." A. Phillip Randolf
In 1896, the Supreme Court in the
Plessy v. Ferguson
decision set the precedent that "
separate
" facilities for blacks and whites were constitutional as long as they were "
equal
".
"Where there is no vision,
there is no hope."
George Washington Carver
In 1909 a group of interracial reformers and civil rights activists founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (
NAACP
).
"Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome while trying to succeed." -- Booker T. Washington
1913, President Woodrow Wilson authorized
federal segregation
of lunchrooms, restrooms, and workplaces.
"The battles that count aren't the ones for gold medals. The struggles within yourself -- the invisible, inevitable battles inside all of us -- that's where it's at." -- Jesse Owens
1948, President Harry S. Truman
integrated the armed forces.
“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.” -- Harriet Tubman
In 1955 a local NAACP leader named Rosa Parks gained national attention for refusing to give up her
bus
seat to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama. A
boycott
of the city's buses followed, led by a local minister, 26 yr old Martin Luther King, Jr.
"The cost of liberty is less than the price of repression." W.E.B. DuBois
1877-1954
Jim Crow
"Jim Crow" was the name of the system of laws that enforced racial segregation and discrimination in the South.
"In recognizing the humanity of our fellow beings, we pay ourselves the highest tribute." -- Thurgood Marshall
On May 17, 1954, resolving the legal challenge brought by the NAACP, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in
Brown v. Board of Education
that the doctrine of separate but equal public schools was unconstitutional.
The History of Civil Rights in the United States
"Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." -- Martin Luther King Jr.
1957-58 School Year:
Desegregation of Little Rock Central High School
in Arkansas
Civil Rights Act of 1957
Sit in movement and founding of SNCC, 1960
Freedom Rides, 1961
"I Have a Dream, 1963
Civil Rights Act of 1964
1965 - Selma to Montgomery march to protest denial of voting rights.
Voting Rights Act of 1965
1967 -Thurgood Marshall becomes the first Supreme Court Justice.
1968 -Martin Luther King was killed by James Earl Ray in Memphis, Tennessee.
"Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave, I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise."
"I rise."
"I rise."

Maya Angelou
Full transcript