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Elton Mayo

By Jordan Smith
by

Jordan Smith

on 14 April 2010

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Transcript of Elton Mayo

Elton Mayo George Elton John Mayo
(26 December 1880 - 7 September 1949)
was an Australian psychologist,
sociologist and organization theorist. Elton Mayo The Hawthorne Studies The research he conducted under the Hawthorne Studies of the 1930s showed the importance of groups in affecting the behavior of individuals at work. Mayo's employees, Roethlisberger and Dickinson, conducted the practical experiments. He carried out a number of investigations to look at ways of improving productivity, for example changing lighting conditions in the workplace. What he found however was that work satisfaction depended to a large extent on the informal social pattern of the work group. Where norms of cooperation and higher output were established because of a feeling of importance, physical conditions or financial incentives had little motivational value. Mayo's Beliefs Individual workers cannot be treated in isolation, but must be seen as members of a group.
Monetary incentives and good working condition are less important to the individual than the need to belong to a group.
Informal or unofficial groups formed at work have a strong influence on the behavior of those workers in a group.
Managers must be aware of these 'social needs' and cater for them to ensure that employees collaborate with the official organization rather than work against it. Mayo's Interview Techniques Mayo's simple instructions to industrial interviewers set a template and remain influential to this day: The simple rules of interviewing: 1. Give your full attention to the person interviewed, and make it evident that you are doing so. 2. Listen - don't talk. 3. Never argue; never give advice. 4. Listen to: what he wants to say; what he does not want to say; what he can not say without help. 5. As you listen, plot out tentatively and for subsequent correction the pattern that is being set before you. To test, summarize what has been said and present for comment. Always do this with caution - that is, clarify but don't add or twist. The End :)
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