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Pronouns

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by

Lyla Zhong

on 13 July 2015

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Transcript of Pronouns

Pronouns
Pronouns
Xiao & Miao

A pronoun is a word that replace the name of a person or object( nouns).
Object forms
Each other and one another
My sister and I
call
each other
every night. ( I call my sister or my sister calls me.)
Students
can help
one another
in many ways. (formal)
She
had a car accident.
He
runs fast.

Subject forms
personal pronouns
interrogative pronouns
relative pronouns
demonstrative pronouns

Reciprocal Pronouns
possessive form
This is
my
backpack. It's
mine
.
this car is
hers
.
All the essays were good but
his
was the best.
Your
photos are good.
Ours
are terrible.

Indefinite pronouns
An indefinite pronoun does not refer to any specific person, thing or amount. Some typical indefinite pronouns are
Singular
Michael passed his card to
another
. (different person)
Each
brought a dessert to share. (Every one)
Can
anyone
answer this question? (No matter what person)
Alice couldn’t hear
anything
at the concert. (No matter what things)
Everything
is going as planned
.
(all things)
Everyone
clapped when the movie ended.

(all people)
All the students arrived but now
one
is missing.( an unidentified person)

Reflexive Pronouns
reciprocal pronouns
infinitive pronouns
We use reciprocal pronouns when each of two or more subjects is acting in the same way towards the other.

For example, A is talking to B, and B is talking to A. So we say: A and B are talking to each other.

The person
who
phoned me last night is my teacher.
The person
whom
I phoned last night is my teacher.
The student
whose
phone just rang should stand up.
The car
which
I drive is old.
This is the book
that
everyone is talking about.
John and Mary love
each other
. (Comom)
The two countries do little trade with
one another
.
Here is an example sentence using the relative pronoun who, which, with and without commas.

1. My sister
who
lives in New York bought an apartment

2. My sister,
who
lives in New York, bought an apartment.

My bike
which
was stolen.

My bike,
which
I bought last week, was stolen.
I pictured
myself
in a beautiful white dress. (Direct object)
We tell
ourselves
that money makes us happy, but it's not true. (Indirect object)
They like to look at themslves in their wedding photos. (the object of a prepostition)
All
are welcome to our house for Thanksgiving. (the whole quantity people)
Tim doesn’t have
any
. (No matter how much or how many)
Plural
Many
missed the bus.

( a large number of people)
John likes coffee but not tea. I think
both
are good.(Two things)
They all complained and
several
left the meeting. (more than two but not many)


Singular / Plural
I invited five friends but
none
have come.( no person)
We use reflexive pronouns for the object when the subject and object are the same.
Compare
:
The groom loves
her
. (object pronoun)
The bride loves
herself
. (reflexive pronoun)

reflexive pronouns
She made the dress
all by herself
.
The bride and groom made the invitations
by themselves.
We often use a reflexive pronoun to mean alone, without help. We often add all by or by before the reflexive pronoun.
A relative pronoun is used to connect a clause or phrase to a noun or pronoun. You see them used everyday with the most common relative pronouns being: who, whom, which, whoever, whomever, whichever, and that.

This
tastes good.
Have you seen
this
?
Do you like
these
?
Those
were the days!
Can you see
those
?
These
are bigger than those.
personal pronouns

Personal pronouns represent specific people or things.
Demonstratie pronoun
A demonstrative pronoun represents a thing or things:
Interrogative pronouns
relative pronouns
The teachter wrote
me
a long note about my essay.
A tall person sat in front of
me
.
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