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A Midsummer Night's Dream Allusions

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by

Shannah Eichel

on 26 March 2014

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Transcript of A Midsummer Night's Dream Allusions

Acheron-
"Thou seest these lovers seek a place to fight. Hie, therefore, Robin, overcast the night; The starry welkin cover thou anon with drooping fog as black as
Acheron
;"
Act 3, Scene 2, Line 363
____________________
Oberon is talking to Puck about his mistake, and describes his plan. This allusion was used to describe how dark the night was so Puck would not be seen with the flower juice and Lysander.
Mythology
Acheron is actually a river in the region of northeast Greece. In mythology however, this river is one of the five in the Greece Underworld, belonging to Hades. Other name for this rive inlcude: Styx and the River of Tartarus.
Another legend says that sould were ferried across this river into Hell by Charon because Acheron was the supposed border to Hell.
Major Literary Sources
Corinthians 1: 2-9
"However, as it is written: "No eye has seen, no ear has heard, no mind has concieved what God has prepared for those who love him"
Here, it is being said that nobody, not even the rulers of the time had understood God fully in his actions or messages, but it is revealed by His Spirit.

This allusion is used by Shakespeare in Bottom's language in Act 4, Scene 1, Line 213-215
"The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste.."
Major Literary Sources

Plutarch,
Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans-

A book of 23 biographies that compare the Greek and Rome side of a person.
In Life of Thesus, he is compared to Romulus, his Athenian counterpart.
Both recognized as warriors
The "Father" of unconquered Rome
Wise and powerful (both)
These traits concerning Theseus made it easy for Shakespeare to allude to this book, and use the traits in his play.
By Willaim Shakespeare
A Midsummer Night's Dream Allusions
Works Cited-
"Acheron." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 26 Mar. 2014.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Acheron_river_2.jpg

"Bottom in a Midsummer Night's Dream - Google Search." Bottom in a Midsummer Night's Dream - Google Search. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Mar. 2014.

"1 Corinthians 2:9 (New International Version)." BibleStudyTools.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Mar. 2014.

"Works of Plutarch." Google Books. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Mar. 2014.
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