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Phrases and Clauses

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by

Bavneet Kaur

on 10 December 2014

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Transcript of Phrases and Clauses

What are clauses
What are phrases
Main types with examples
Putting them together
How to use them both when writing
Today's Learning
Goals....
Dependent Clauses
Clauses
Subject -> person or thing (Who?)
Predicate -> often contains verb (What?)
Bavneet Kaur
Phrases and Clauses
Grammar is Important:
Dependent Clauses
A group of words that
includes
a
subject
and its related
predicate
Independent Clauses
Main clauses
Form simple sentence
A
clause
that can
stand on its own
as a
sentence
1)
She

wore fifty hairpins.
2) Billy began practicing his dance routine.
3) Nicki sat on the couch.
Putting Clauses Together...
Subordinate clauses pair up with main clauses using subordinating conjunctions
Subordinate clauses
Seen as sentence fragments
A
clause
that
cannot stand on its own
as a sentence
1)
Because

she

has frizzy hair
2) Although she knew she has work to do
3) After he plugged his MP3 player in
Headed by subordinating conjunctions

T
hough,
i
f,

s
ince,
b
efore,
b
ecause,
w
hen,
w
hile,
w
hom,
w
hich,
u
ntil,
t
hat

TIS 2B 4W UT
1)
Because

she has frizzy hair,

she wore fifty hairpins.
2) After he plugged his MP3 player in, Billy began practicing his dance routine.
3) Nicki sat on the couch although she knew she had work to do.
Phrases
A
group of words
that work together
in a sentence
but are
missing a subject, a predicate or both
Main clauses can pair up using coordinating conjunctions

F
or,
a
nd,
n
or,
b
ut,
o
r,
y
et,
s
o ->
FANBOYS
Billy went to the store

and

Sam went home.
Prepositional phrases, infinitive phrases and gerund phrases
Prepositional Phrases
Infinitive Phrases
Gerund Phrases
Working with Both Phrases and Clauses
Tips on using Phrases and Clauses
Preposition + Object of the Preposition
Object of the preposition -> Noun or pronoun of the phrase
Preposition -> Space, time, direction (When? Where?)
1) The teacher
of the month
claimed her award.
2) The letter sat
on the desk
.
3) We bought the house on the corner.
4) With a puzzled look, Maria followed her brother.
Infinitive + Its Modifier(s) and/or Complement(s)
Infinitive -> A combination of the word "to" and the bare form of a verb
Modifier -> Word that describes or makes something specific
Complement -> Word(s) that completes the sense of a subject, object or verb
1)
To remember
soldiers' service
is to honor all that they have done.
2) Linda wanted to leave the game.
3) I can show you the way to reach the exit.
Gerund + Its Modifier(s) and/or Object(s)
Gerund -> A verb form ending in
-ing
Always used as a noun
1)
Confronting
a problem
can be difficult.
2) Pursuing knowledge can be a very rewarding
experience.
3) Swimming laps is good exercise.
Building blocks for sentences
Main clause = simple sentence
Subordinate clauses join main clauses
Phrases join clauses to make sentences
Phrase can be turned into a clause

After having dinner...
->
After
he
had dinner...
Clause can be turned into a phrase

After
he
had dinner...
->

After having dinner...
Don't stick only to main clauses! Overuse = choppy writing piece
Sometimes put the dependent clause before the independent one and sometimes put it after
To differentiate between a phrase and a subordinate clause, check for
both
a subject and predicate
Works Cited
Full transcript