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The Nile

The Nile River was essential to the development of Ancient Egypt
by

Alison Corliss

on 8 May 2011

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Transcript of The Nile

The Nile At 6,650 km the Nile River is the longest river in the world. A similar distance is travelling from Newcastle to Alice Springs to Perth.

The River Nile is formed from the White Nile, which originates at Lake Victoria and the Blue Nile, which originates at Lake Tana in Ethiopia. These rivers meet in Sudan and then go on their long journey northwards towards the sea. Ancient Egypt could not have existed without the river Nile. Since rainfall is almost non-existent in Egypt, the floods provided the only source of moisture to sustain crops.

Every year, heavy summer rain in the Ethiopian highlands, sent a torrent of water that overflowed the banks of the Nile. When the floods went down it left thick rich mud (black silt) which was excellent soil to plant seeds in after it had been ploughed. Reeds, called papyrus, grew along side the Nile. The Egyptians made paper and boats from the reeds. The Nile also gave the ancient Egyptians food. They used spears and nets to catch fish. They would also use the nets to catch birds that flew close to the surface of the water. Another way the Nile helped the ancient Egyptians was in trade. The Nile was the quickest and easiest way to travel from place to place. Egyptians could measure the flooding of the Nile with a nilometer
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