Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Russia's Physical and Human Geography

No description
by

Robert Saunders

on 23 May 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Russia's Physical and Human Geography

Russia's Physical and Human Geography Russian Federation
Baltic States
Estonia
Latvia
Lithuania
Western Republics
Belarus
Ukraine
Moldova
Transcaucasia
Georgia
Armenia
Azerbaijan
Central Asia
Kazakhstan
Uzbekistan
Kyrgyzstan
Turkmenistan
Tajikistan Flags of the Newly Independent States Indo-European Peoples
Slavic Peoples
Russians
Ukrainians
Belarusians
Baltic Peoples
Lithuanians
Latvians
Other
Tajiks
Ossetians
Armenians
Roma
Turkic Peoples
Uzbeks
Kazakhs
Turkmen
Kyrgyz
Azeris
Tatars
Bashkirs
Sakha (Yakuts)
Balkars
Karachai
Nogay
Altay Finno-Ugric Peoples
Estonians
Komi
Mari
Mansi
Mordvins
Udmurts
Chuvash
Karelians
Mongolic Peoples
Buryats
Kalmyks
Caucasian Peoples
Chechens
Ingush
Circassians
Georgians
Dagestanis
Paleo-Siberian Peoples
Chukchi
Nivkhs
Koryaks Bodies of Water
Arctic Ocean
Barents Sea
Kara Sea
Laptev Sea
East Siberian Sea
Pacific Ocean
Bering Sea
Sea of Okhotsk
Other
Baltic Sea
Black Sea
Caspian Sea
Aral Sea
Lake Baikal
Lake Balkhash
Rivers
Dnieper, Ob, Lena, Don, and Volga Mountains and Highlands
Urals
Caucasus
Carpathians
Altai
Tien Shan
Pamirs
Kolyma Range
Central Siberian Plateau
Lowlands
East European Plain
Kazakh Steppe
Kyzyl Kum and Kara Kum Deserts
Other
Novaya Zemlya
Kamchatka Peninsula
Sakhalin
Crimean Peninsula Highest level of autonomy (ASSRs under Soviet rule)
President, parliament, flag, anthem, constitution, control of borders, etc.
Typically constructed around a single ethnic group (sometime two, or in the case of Dagestan, several)
Tend to have a second official language (in addition to Russian)
Given near independence by Boris Yeltsin (except for foreign policy and military)
“Little Fathers” are being reined in by Vladimir Putin Ethnic Republics Autonomous Okrugs (AOk)
Khantiya-Mansiya, Nenetsiya, Yamaliya, and Chukotka
Possess a titular population and moderate levels of sovereignty
Under-populated and poor local population
Subordinate to another federal subject (usually subsidized)
Being phased out by Vladimir Putin
Federal City
Moscow
St. Petersburg
Autonomous Oblast (AO)
Only one: Jewish AO or Birobijan
Subordinate to another federal subject
Yiddish is the “titular” language
Oblasts
Most common administrative unit
Majority ethnic Russian population
Little autonomy from the center
Krai
Very similar to oblasts, but possess a historical legacy as a border zone (imperial character) Other Federal Subjects Second largest religion and fastest growing; 14% of citizens are practicing or ethnic Muslims
Most are of the tolerant Hanafi school of jurisprudence, but threat of Saudi-infleunced Wahhabism is real
Located in the tow capitals, North Caucasus, Volga region, and parts of Siberia
Indigenous Russian nationalities (Tatars, Bashkirs, Chechen, as well immigrants from Central Asia)
Suffered more than Christians under Soviet rule; renewal of Islamic identity is quite strong Islam in Russia Eastern rite was adopted in Kievan Rus 1,000 years ago
135 million followers; second only to Catholicism among the Christian churches
Repressed under Joseph Stalin, but survived in homes and hearts of common Russians
Resurgence under Yeltsin and Putin as politicians use the Church for political ends
Strong stand against Westernization, homosexuality, and consumerism
Kirill I succeeded the late Alexius II n 2009
Other Orthodox Churches
Ukrainian, Armenian, Georgian, etc. are also recognized as autochthonous faiths in Russia
Subject to the implied leadership of the ROC Russian Orthodox Church Other Forms of Christianity
Old Believers
Breakaway sect of Russian Orthodoxy
Once exiled, now being welcomed back to Russia
Catholicism
Larger number of followers than Judaism or Buddhism, but not recognized as indigenous by the government
Common among Poles, Lithuanians, and other minorities
Protestantism
Rejected as foreign faith
Missionaries and followers are often harassed Other Forms of Christianity Prominent among the Kalmyks (Europe’s only indigenous Buddhist community) and the Turkic and Mongolic peoples of Siberia and the Russian Far East (Buryats, Tuvans, etc.)
Most are practitioners of Lamaism and revere the Dalai Lama who has visited the country twice
Faith is often mixed with animistic and shamanistic practices
Revival is being led by the president of Kalmykia, Kirsan Ilyumzhinov Buddhism in Russia Diversity of the community
Khorasan Jews of the Caucasus and Bukharan Jews
Khazar converts
Ashkenazim from Poland-Lithuania
Strong representation among the Bolsheviks (atheists and socialists)
Persecution
Pale of Settlement
Pogroms and the Cossacks
Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion
Ethnic Jews and the “Fifth Line”
Soviet anti-Zionism and the “Refuseniks” (otkazniki)
New Era of Russian Judaism
Contacts with the global Jewish community
Links to émigrés in Israel
Embrace of abandoned Jewish identity
Recognized as an indigenous faith by Moscow
Contemporary Anti-Semitism
Rise of neo-Nazis; attacks on synagogues
Linked to the oligarchs
Useful political tool for nationalists and the new Communist Party Judaism in Russia Russian Paganism
Slavic neo-paganism, sometimes called Vedism, is on the rise
Mixture of New Age ideology, environmentalism, and Slavic and Hindu traditions (Rerikh Movement)
Political neo-paganism is highly anti-Semitic and anti-Christian
Other Forms of Paganism
Belief in witchcraft remains extremely common in Russia and is a cottage industry in post-Soviet Russia
Shamanism remains popular among many peoples of Siberia and the Far North (annual shaman contest)
Animism and tree-worship remain part of the lives of many Finno-Ugric peoples, including the Mari and Udmurts
Ak Jang (White Faith), a millenarian anti-Russian faith is seeing a resurgence among the Altai people; neo-Tengrism is on the rise among some Turkics Pre-Christian Faiths
Full transcript