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INFECTION CONTROL

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by

Meil Alarzar

on 11 November 2014

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Transcript of INFECTION CONTROL

INFECTION CONTROL
DIALYSIS SETTING

WHAT ARE THE STANDARD PRECAUTIONS?
Step 2: INFECTION CONTROL
Contact Precautions
intended to prevent transmission of infectious agents including MRO's which are spread by direct or indirect contact
THE GOAL?
by: Melissa Alarzar, RN, CNN
STANDARD PRECAUTION
vs.
INFECTION CONTROL

"Assume that all
patients are infectious"

More stringent than Standard Precautions
and designed to prevent transmission
of blood borne virus
and bacterial pathogens
1. HAND HYGIENE
YOUR HANDS CARRY INFECTION
Hand hygiene is a general term used to describe any type of hand cleansing.
PRINCIPLES
All staff should cover cuts and abrasions with waterproof dressings
Staff who provide direct hands-on care to patients should not wear artificial fingernails or extenders.
Hand hygiene facilities should be located as close as possible to the point of contact with patients and dialysis equipment
It is important to reinforce that hands should be rubbed together after application of the alcohol-based hand hygiene product until all the alcohol has evaporated before engaging in other activities.
2. Personal Protective Equipments
PPE'S ARE BEST IN PROTECTION
GOWNS
EYESHIELD/ GOGGLES
FACE SHIELD
GLOVES
indicated to prevent contamination of the HCW’s clothing with
blood, body fluids, MRO’s and other potentially infectious material
A long-sleeved, fluid-barrier gown should be worn if exposed areas of the body

All PPE (with the exception of eyewear/goggles unless soiled) should be changed
and hand hygiene performed between attending different patients.

PPE should be changed at the earliest opportunity if it becomes contaminated with blood or body fluids


GLOVES
WORN WHEN:
Touching blood and body fluids
Handling items or surfaces soiled
Performing vascular access procedures

CHANGED WHEN:
After contact with each patient
Whenever gloves are blood stained
After handling infectious waste containers

EYE SHIELD
• required when performing procedures that may generate splashes or sprays of blood or body fluids.
Personal eyeglasses and contact lenses are not considered adequate eye protection.
Eye protection (goggles) should allow for sufficient peripheral vision, be adjustable
to ensure a secure fit, and incorporate indirect air flow properties to reduce fogging.
CARE FOR PATIENTS AND FOR YOURSELF
Scheduled Immunization is one of the best protection we can offer
Aseptic Technique
Break the chain of infection
EQUIPMENT MANAGEMENT
Sharps containers shall be located as close as possible to the point of generation either attached to a trolley or on a mobile stand.
All sharps, including those with safety features, shall be disposed of into an approved sharps container.
Sharps containers should be large enough to accommodate the types of devices being used in the area.
Medication carts/trolleys should not be used to deliver medications to patients.

All parenteral medications should be prepared in a clean area separate from potentially contaminated items and surfaces.

Do not carry medication vials, syringes, alcohol impregnated swabs or supplies in pockets
Routine Serum Testing
Dialysis patients are at risk for acquiring BBV infections including HBV, HCV and
HIV.

Of these viruses,
hepatitis B
has most commonly been transmitted during
hemodialysis treatment.
Most Common Blood Borne Viruses (BBV)
HBV
HCV
HIV
MULTI-RESISTANT
ORGANISMS
MRSA
ESBL
CRAB
THERE
IS
NO
ESKAPE!
GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
* Every week, HD patients are exposed to almost 400 L of water
* The only way to keep bacterial growth under control is prevention

AN ENVIRONMENT WHERE PATIENTS THRIVE AND NOT BACTERIA
... THE END
THANK YOU!
Minimize equipment close to dialysis machine and patients

dialysis machines should be internally disinfected and externally cleaned and allowed to dry after each patient treatment

ROUTINE CLEANING
BBV contaminated Equipment

Small blood spills (<10ml)
- use sodium hypochlorite 1:100 dilution

Large blood spills (>10ml)
- decontaminate using 1:10 dilution
Communal equipment especially weighing scale shold be cleaned after use with detergent and water at least daily


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