Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Albert Ellis Project

No description
by

Tiina M

on 14 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Albert Ellis Project

“The central theme of RET is that man is a uniquely rational, as well as a uniquely irrational animal.” ~Ellis What is Rational Emotive Therapy? The history of RET and how it developed: REBT was one of the first of the cognitive behavior therapies, which Ellis proposed in articles, which he first published in 1956.
Ellis has clearly stated that “much of the theory of REBT was derived from philosophy rather than psychology”
The philosophy of Epicurus 341–270 B.C. was a complete and interdependent system, involving a view of the goal of human life which is inevitably happiness. Epicureanism emphasized the goal of a happy and content life in the here and now.
RET is both a psychotherapeutic system of theory and practices.
Albert Ellis established a school of thought. He originally called (RET), simply rational therapy. Ellis later revised the name to Rational Emotive Therapy in 1959.
Ellis submitted his therapy almost a full decade before Aaron Beck’s version of Cognitive Therapy.
In 1992, Ellis changed Rational Emotive Therapy (RET) to Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, or (REBT). A-B-C Theory of Emotional Disturbance Albert Ellis The theorist behind
Rational Emotive Therapy The history of
Albert Ellis Albert Ellis was born in September 1913.
Albert died at the age of 93 on the 24th of July 2007... but not without contributing a prolific amount of writing on RET and other similar subjects.
There is now an institute of study in his name in New York established in 1959
Things that possibly effected him as a child:
Able bodied older brother
Suffered with disabilities
kidney disorder
studious (leaned heavily on academic pursuits due to his health--was highly interested in philosophy)
mother wasn't a good writer and encouraged him to become so.
He didn't actually pursue his academic interests in counselling until he went back to school in 1942
BUT... Ellis would say:
“The past is not crucial in a persons life. The past effects him a good deal but he effects himself more than the past effects him because no matter what he has learned during his historical development the only reason why these things that have happened to him or have been told to him affect him today is because he is still re-indoctrinating himself with the same philosophies of life, and the same values, that he usually imbibed and taught himself too early in his childhood. So we stick largely to the present in rational emotive therapy.”
So lets move on to more about how where his theory comes from and the progression of his theory into modern day. Eleven Common Irrational Beliefs
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 1:The idea that it is a dire necessity for an adult human being to be loved or approved by virtually every significant person in his community.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 2:The idea that one should be thoroughly competent, adequate, and achieving in all possible respects if one is to consider oneself worthwhile.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 3:The idea that certain people are bad, wicked, or villainous and that they should be severely blamed and punished for their villainy.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 4:The idea that it is awful and catastrophic when things are not the way that one would very much like them to be.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 5:The idea that human unhappiness is externally caused and that people have little or no ability to control their sorrows or disturbances. Foundations of Rational-Emotive Therapy IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 6:The idea that if something is or may be dangerous or fearsome one should be terribly concerned about it and should keep dwelling on the possibility of its occurrence.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 7:The idea that it is easier to avoid rather than to face certain life difficulties and self-responsibilities.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 8:The idea that one should be dependent on others and needs someone stronger than oneself on whom to rely.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 9:The idea that ones past history is an all-important determiner of ones present behavior and that because something once strongly affected one’s life, it should definitely have a similar effect.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 10:The idea that one should become quite upset over other peoples problems and disturbances.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 11:The idea that there is invariably a right, precise, and perfect solution to human problems and that it is catastrophic if this perfect solution is not found. Further Explanation of Rational Emotive Therapy: A. Activating Experience Man friend breaks the news that he is going out with another woman, and therefore wants to break off his relationship with you. B. Irrational Beliefs about the Experience “I really must be a worthless person.”“I’ll never find another great man like him.”“He doesn’t want me; therefore no one could possibly want me.”and/or“This is awful!” “Everything happens to me!” “That jerk!” “He shouldn’t be that way.”“I can’t stand the world being so unfair and lousy.” C. Upsetting Emotional Consequences Depression and/or hostility. D. Disputing of Irrational Ideas “Where’s the evidence that because this man wishes to end our relationship, that I’m a worthless person; or that I’ll never be able to have a really good relationship with someone else; or even that I couldn’t be happy alone?” “Why is it awful that I’m not getting what I want?” “Why shouldn’t the world be full of injustices?” “How does her rejecting me make me a bad person?” E. New Emotional Consequence or Effect

Sadness: “Well, we did have a nice relationship, and I’m sorry to see it end – but it did have its problems and now I can go out and find a new friend.”

OR

Annoyance: “It’s annoying that he was seeing someone but it isn’t awful or intolerable.”


IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 1:The idea that it is a dire necessity for an adult human being to be loved or approved by virtually every significant person in his community.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 2:The idea that one should be thoroughly competent, adequate, and achieving in all possible respects if one is to consider oneself worthwhile.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 3:The idea that certain people are bad, wicked, or villainous and that they should be severely blamed and punished for their villainy.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 4:The idea that it is awful and catastrophic when things are not the way that one would very much like them to be.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 5:The idea that human unhappiness is externally caused and that people have little or no ability to control their sorrows or disturbances. IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 6:The idea that if something is or may be dangerous or fearsome one should be terribly concerned about it and should keep dwelling on the possibility of its occurrence.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 7:The idea that it is easier to avoid rather than to face certain life difficulties and self-responsibilities.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 8:The idea that one should be dependent on others and needs someone stronger than oneself on whom to rely.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 9:The idea that ones past history is an all-important determiner of ones present behavior and that because something once strongly affected one’s life, it should definitely have a similar effect.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 10:The idea that one should become quite upset over other peoples problems and disturbances.
IRRATIONAL IDEA NO. 11:The idea that there is invariably a right, precise, and perfect solution to human problems and that it is catastrophic if this perfect solution is not found. Eleven Common Irrational Beliefs “People had better define their own freedom, cultivate a good measure of individuality, live in dialogue with others…and learn to accept their own human limitations and the fact that they will eventually die.” ~Ellis

RET asserts that people are the only measure of people; God is irrelevant to the human outlook.

“People are not disturbed by things, but by the views which they take of them.” Epictetus

RET: changing people’s beliefs (the view they take of something) will reduce or eliminate psychological disturbance. Rational Emotive Therapy does not have a particular set of values for every client making it both hard to quantify but easy to manipulate for use in faith-based therapy.

Although Ellis was reluctant to prescribe universal values, he enthusiastically concludes that people should internalize the following values he termed as rational attitudes:
•Self-interest
•Social interest
•Self-direction
•High frustration tolerance
•Flexibility
•Acceptance of uncertainty
•Commitment to creative pursuits
•Scientific thinking
•Self-accpetance,
•Risk-taking, long-range hedonism,
•Non-utopianism
•Responsibility for our own emotional disturbances RET is open to different value commitments and definitions of rationality, however Ellis listed values that clients needed to be taught if they desired to obtain happiness and minimize emotional disturbance thus contradicting himself.

Published an impressive number of articles and books on his work, however they were self-promoting and redundant, so if you read but a few of his works you would gain a relatively accurate understanding of his approach. People know truth by sifting through thoughts, feelings, and behavior issues. (John 8:32) “You shall know the truth and the truth will set you free.”
Rational emotive therapy looks at human beliefs as mental habits that can be influenced or behavioral habits that can be changed.
One central element of rational emotive therapy is the development of positive self-concepts. As believers we aim for the same in centering around God’s unconditional love for us through Jesus Christ.
Scripture also commands us to develop right emotions (Galatians 5:22-23) “Hope, kindness, love, joy, peace.” Apostle Paul calls for renewing your mind in which the new self will be like God in true righteousness and holiness (Romans 12:2, Ephesians 4:23)
Evil thoughts lead to sinful behaviors (Galatians 5:19-20) “Out of men’s hearts comes evil thoughts (e.g. sexual immorality, theft, etc.)
Jesus said, “What comes out of a man’s mouth is what makes him unclean” Mark 7:20-33 Two methods of repairing negative beliefs:
1) encourage progress
2) learn new ways to act in your relationships, work, classes with friends, and parents
Change will be uncomfortable and unfamiliar, but it will produce a better life.
Jesus on the cross, Apostle Paul
Like rational emotive theorists, Christians also believe it is important to be aware of unhealthy and irrational beliefs
Christians have adopted RET because of its emphasis on spiritual, moral and emotional health which we as believers know comes from the truth of God’s word (Hebrews 10:26)
Most evangelical or conservative Christians prefer or are comfortable with RET because both find groups find that beliefs impact behaviors which directly affect quality of life. (Romans 8:28)
Full transcript