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Art and Design Week 2

ADAD1100, ADAD9113
by

Roland Muller

on 2 August 2016

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Transcript of Art and Design Week 2

Communication in Art, Design and Media
Determine what the focus is and what the literature has had to say about the topic.
What are we being asked to do?

What instructions are we being given in the question?
Structure
Method 1
Method 2
point of comparison and contrast 1

point of comparison and contrast 2

point of comparison and contrast 3
Introduction
•State the topic and recent trends relating to the topic.

•Contextualise
Identify issues and concerns especially controversial ones

•Define key terms if necessary

•Thesis Statement

•Outline
State how you will argue your case
Paragraph 1

Arguments in favour

Evaluate assertion and strengthen claims by supporting your claims with evidence
Paragraph 2

Present argument against and rebut

Additional arguments in favour
Conclusion
•Restate thesis
•Summarise reasons
•Make recommendations or discuss the implications
Qualification
Caution
Comparison and Contrast
Contrast
in contrast
conversely
on the contrary
x, unlike y
however
whereas
while
Concession
even though
despite
while
x is _______: nevertheless, y is _________.
Patterns of similarity
x ____________,
similarly
likewise
comparably
equally
in the same way,
y ___________________
Developments in technology had as much impact on art practice in the latter part of the 20th century as the introduction of new technologies in the early part of that century. Discuss.
An old Chinese proverb states that "without trials and tribulations, no one can become a Buddha." The proverb points to the idea that we can never become truly great unless we experience suffering. To those of us who have lived in a land of peace and prosperity, this may seem an odd claim. However, if we take an honest look at those things that have most helped us grow as individuals, we will notice a clear pattern: Our most painful, difficult experiences are the ones that have truly stretched us. Just as on the physical plane our muscles must be strained and stretched, exercised and worked in order to be strengthened, so must we must face straining and trying circumstances if our characters are to grow strong. In his children's tale The Hobbit, J. R. R. Tolkien deals with this issue. He demonstrates in his novel that it is only by facing the sometimes overwhelming obstacles and difficulties of life that an individual can truly grow and reach his or her full potential.

(2010), A Sample Introduction. Available from: http://fclass.vaniercollege.qc.ca/~kingsmip/tolkien/fotr_intro.htm [Accessed: February 25, 2012].
“Grant Wood’s American Gothic (1930) seems to be so American a painting that it comes as a surprise to learn that it is indebted to European sources.”
“Does it make a difference if the subjects of Grant Wood’s American Gothic (1930) are a father and daughter rather than husband and wife?”
Introductions
Paragraphs
Conclusions
Nature both as a physical environment and as an intellectual concept intrigued antebellum America. Countless scientists, philosophers, poets, artists, and theologians sought to discover and interpret the multifarious qualities of Nature. They subjected Nature to their individual desires and beliefs. By Mid-century several publications, especially periodicals, devoted a number of pages to literary and aesthetic criticism in which Nature often figured as a subtext. This essay examines the role these debates played in the formation of the distinctive nature aesthetic evident in the work of many prominent artists of the time. Firstly, this essay will investigate the role of literary criticism in the formation of this distinctive aesthetic, secondly it will question the role which art critics played in defining the predominant style of that period. * 1.

1 Adapted from: Simon, J. (1990). The Crayon', 1855-1861: The voice of nature in criticism,
poetry, and the fine arts. (Volumes I and II). Digital Dissertations, University of Michigan.
(UMI: 9023639)
ADAD1100
content words
Task words
Limiting words
ADAD9113
Essay Questions
Argument
Discussion
Time plays a significant role in the progression of society, with advances and new discoveries in technology changing the notion of art in both the past and present. This suggests that the perception and reception of art must also be developed in order to receive the art in its modern context. These views are evident in Walter Benjamin's 'The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility' and can be applied to a range of disciplines and practices in the current era despite having been written to target academics. The following essay will examine the key concepts of Benjamin’s piece such as reproducibility, authenticity, perception, reception and exhibition as well as how they relate to digital media specifically.
In 1936 Europeans were bearing witness to a rapidly changing sociopolitical landscape, characterized by technological revolution and growing political instability. Technical reproduction was changing the apperception in the denizens of the age. Walter Benjamin defined the concept of aura - authenticity as it relates to art in The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility. Benjamin’s key points discuss how art was first intercepted by technical reproduction and how this went on to systematically redefine the very notion. The broader sociopolitical changes occurring during the timeline of Benjamin’s academic career are intrinsically linked to his conclusions drawn from exposure to developing technologies.
Is there a clear topic sentence?

Are the supporting sentences clear and do they relate to the topic sentence?

Does the paragraph have a clear development from for example cause to effect or general to particular?

Have you provided transition words or implied transition from one sentence to another?

Is the paragraph of a good length? Not too long or too short?

Does the paragraph have a purpose e.g. summary, concession of a point, illustration of an idea etc.?

Does the paragraph have substance?

Does the topic sentence declare a single point?

Is the topic sentence relevant to the thesis?

Is the topic sentence where you expect it to be - that is, at or near the beginning of a paragraph?

Is there a clear relationship between this topic sentence and the paragraph that came before?

Does the topic sentence organize and control the entire paragraph?

Do all the grammatical subjects of the sentences reflect the real subject of the paragraph?

Are all the grammatical subjects consistent?

Do the sentences look backward as well as forward?

Are you following the principle of moving from old to new?

Are you using repetition to create a sense of unity?

Have you considered the transitions between sentences?

Topic sentences
Cohesion
Coherence
Single point

Relevance to the thesis

Position

Relationship between topic sentence and the paragraph before

Organize and control the paragraph

Clear topic sentence

Supporting sentences clear and relate to topic sentence

Clear development

Transition from one sentence to another

Good length

Purpose

Substance

Grammatical subjects reflect the real subject of the paragraph

Grammatical subjects consistent

Sentences look backward and forward

Principles of unity and development

Repetition to create a sense of unity

Transitions between sentences?

Generalisation
In the text taken from
Visual Methodologies
by Gillian Rose highlight any words, devices or expressions that:
link sentences
aid in the movement from one sentence or idea to the next
Does the topic sentence declare a single point?

Is the topic sentence relevant to the thesis?

Is the topic sentence where you expect it to be - that is, at or near the beginning of a paragraph?

Is there a clear relationship between this topic sentence and the paragraph that came before?

Does the topic sentence organize and control the entire paragraph?

Is there a clear topic sentence?

Are the supporting sentences clear and do they relate to the topic sentence?

Does the paragraph have a clear development from for example cause to effect or general to particular?

Have you provided transition words or implied transition from one sentence to another?

Is the paragraph of a good length? Not too long or too short?

Does the paragraph have a purpose e.g. summary, concession of a point, illustration of an idea etc.?

Does the paragraph have substance?

Do all the grammatical subjects of the sentences reflect the real subject of the paragraph?

Are all the grammatical subjects consistent?

Do the sentences look backward as well as forward?

Are you following the principle of moving from old to new?

Are you using repetition to create a sense of unity?

Have you considered the transitions between sentences?

reliability
relevance
compare and contrast
connections
Critical thinkers
introduce topic
background
importance
something new
authors position
what is to come
define terms
Argument
Shows a balanced view of the arguments/issues
Writer may express a preference but acknowledges the opposing arguments

Conclusions acknowledge both sides but clearly state implications and recommendations

Purpose
Features
Discussion


To evaluate both sides of an argument or issue
To consider both sides and come to some final judgement

Purpose
To persuade
Writer’s position is clear and other arguments are discredited

Features
To persuade the reader to accept the writer’s point of view
Expresses strong position
Alternative positions are refuted
Counterarguments put forward
Conclusions are clear and unambiguous

conclusions
restate or modify the position presented in the introduction
Subject 1
point of comparison and contrast 1

point of comparison and contrast 2

point of comparison and contrast 3
Subject 2
Subject 2
Subject 1
Subject 2
Subject 1


point of comparison and contrast 1
point of comparison and contrast 2
point of comparison and contrast 3
Subject 1
Subject 2
usually
for the most part
often
rarely
undoubtedly
“It is often suggested that…”
“There is a tendency to…”
“It is widely accepted that…”
“The majority believe that…”
"There were few who were found to be following traditional concepts
"There was a likehood of seeing..."
"60 % believe that..."
"One in twenty were found to be following traditional concepts"
"There was a one in three chance of seeing..."
Assess, describe, compare, discuss, examine, illustrate, relate, etc.
e.g.
Computers have had a
SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
on education in the
20TH CENTURY
. Discuss the
CHANGES
they have made.
appropriate generalisations from evidence
recognise contradictions
evaluate ideas and concepts
identify assumptions and evaluate
explore implications and consequences
own attitudes
their own culture
Full transcript