Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

10 Ideas Heritage Learners MALT 2013

No description
by

Janet Eckerson

on 23 February 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 10 Ideas Heritage Learners MALT 2013

Janet Eckerson Teaching Heritage Language Learners: 10 Ideas that Work # 1 : Make text aural and oral. #2 : Model writing tasks. HLLs are capable of very complex and sophisticated writing if they can see examples of text structure, register and voice. For example, If they see what a reporter sounds like, they can often manage a journalistic tone through mimicry and patch-writing. #3 : Do sustained silent reading (SSR). Provide a large selection of high-interest, appropriately leveled reading materials. #4 : Teach content. Actually reading is one of the very best ways to get better at reading. Reading something you like makes you want to read more, so then you get better at reading because you're reading more. Crete Public Schools
University of Nebraska-Lincoln MALT 2013 Heritage Language Learners are NOT the same as Second Language Learners BUT Heritage Language Learners are NOT the same as "Native" speakers L2 learners HLLs L1 speakers What do we know about appropriate instruction for HLLS? Credit where credit is due. #5 : Connect students to their communities. #6 : Teach "as needed" grammar & orthography #7 : Use mastery approaches. #8 : Create authentic contexts for language use. #9: Actively and aggressively teach academic strategies and techniques. #10 : Use performance assessments Questions?
Want more information? janete@creteschools.org
(402) 202 - 4375

Janet Eckerson
c/o Crete High
1500 E. 15th Street
Crete, NE 68333 Accented speech
Limited vocabulary, though standard and academic
Knows grammatical rules but struggles to employ them in communicative contexts
Usually well-developed academic literacy skills in L1
Very limited sociolinguistic competencies "Near-native" pronunciation & fluency
Extensive vocabulary limited to familiar contexts
Uses most grammatical structures correctly with some interference
Wide individual diversity in literacy skills
Depth of sociolinguistic competence in familiar contexts High levels of fluency
Range and depth of vocabulary
Uses even complex grammatical structures effortlessly
Range and depth of literacy skills
Range and depth of sociolinguistic competencies Source: Kagan, O., & Dillon, K. (2008). Issues in Heritage Language Learning in the United States. In N. Van Deusen-Scholl & N. H. Hornberger (Eds.). Encyclopedia of Language and Education (2nd ed., Vol 4), New York: Springer. Pp. 143-156) Beaudrie, S. (2011). A corpus-based study on the misspellings of Spanish heritage learners and their implications for teaching, Linguistics and Education, 23, 135-144.

Carriera, M. (2007). Spanish-for-native-speaker matters: Narrowing the Latino achievement gap through Spanish language instruction. Heritage Language Journal, (5)1, 147-171. Retrevied from http://www.international.ucla.edu/media/files/M_Crr_HLJ_5_1.pdf.

Carreira, M. & Kagan, O. (2011). The results of the National Heritage Language Survey: Implications for teaching, curriculum design and professional development. Foreign Language Annals, 44(1), p. 40-64.

Kagan, O., & Dillon, K. (2008). Issues in Heritage Language Learning in the United States. In N. Van Deusen-Scholl & N. H. Hornberger (Eds.). Encyclopedia of Language and Education (2nd ed., Vol 4), New York: Springer. Pp. 143-156

Kagan, O. E. & Dillon, K. E. (2009). The professional development of teachers of heritage learners: A matrix. In M. Anderson & A. Lazaraton (Eds.), Building Contexts, Making Connections: Selected Papers from the Fifth International Conference on Language Teacher Education (pp. 155-175). Minneapolis, MN: Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition.

Krashen, S. (2009) 88 Generalizations about free and voluntary reading. IATEFL Young Learner and Teenager Special Interest Group Publication 2009-1.

Leeman, J. (2005), Engaging Critical Pedagogy: Spanish for Native Speakers. Foreign Language Annals, 38, 35–45. doi: 10.1111/j.1944-9720.2005.tb02451.x

Potowski, K. (2001). Educating university foreign language teachers to work with heritage Spanish speakers. In B. Johnston & S. Irujo (Eds.) Research and Practice in Language Teacher Education: Voices from the Field, Selected Papers from the First International Conference on Language Teacher Education, (pp. 87-100). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition.

Valdés, G. (1997). The teaching of Spanish to Bilingual Spanish-speaking students: Outstanding issues and unanswered questions. In M. C. Colombi & F. X. Alarcón (Eds.), La enseñanza del español a hispanohablantes: Praxis y teoría, (pp. 8-44). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. Macro- rather than micro-curricular models Individualized and differentiated rather than "lock-step" Authentic, age-appropriate materials rather than modified content Content-focused rather than form-focused Respectful of linguistic diversity, dialectal variation, community language use and students' funds of knowledge Sources:
Kagan, O. E. & Dillon, K. E. (2009). The professional development of teachers of heritage learners: A matrix. In M. Anderson & A. Lazaraton (Eds.), Building Contexts, Making Connections: Selected Papers from the Fifth International Conference on Language Teacher Education (pp. 155-175). Minneapolis, MN: Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition.Leeman, J. (2005), Engaging Critical Pedagogy: Spanish for Native Speakers. Foreign Language Annals, 38, 35–45. doi: 10.1111/j.1944-9720.2005.tb02451.x
Valdés, G. (1997). The teaching of Spanish to Bilingual Spanish-speaking students: Outstanding issues and unanswered questions. In M. C. Colombi & F. X. Alarcón (Eds.), La enseñanza del español a hispanohablantes: Praxis y teoría, (pp. 8-44). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. Thanks to: Dr. M. Isabel Velázquez
Piper Porras
Tricia Gray
Jodi Grice
Emily Hoesley
Amber Leinart
CPS Administration
Karen Buchfinck Oral comprehension (listening) is typically the HLL's strongest skill. Read aloud to students (SERIOUS Literature) Read aloud in pairs and groups. Record texts for struggling readers. Create dramatic representations of texts. Practice reading aloud to build fluency & improve decoding. Use real texts as models. Create teacher examples of writing products.
(or better yet, actually write one in front of them and talk aloud your process) Save "do" and "don't" student samples. Explicitly point out important features of model texts. Krashen (2009) (ZONA LIBRE series; get books from friends and students traveling abroad, subscribe to magazines, scan Better World Books....) Read for at least 15 minutes twice per week - Teacher reads too! Lay off the accountability measures: If they're genuinely interested in the book, they'll read. Encourage students to recommend books to one another - talk about books you've read with students. Read books they'd like and recommend them. HLLs already "know" the language; they may not know how to communicate all the other things they know in their HL - because most of their schooling is in the majority language. Teach history. Teach literature. Teach science. en español en español en español Teach about anything YOU know: Dancing, cooking, running, the Incas, fishing, psychology, China, the prairie, the rainforest, modern art.... Teach about anything STUDENTS know: Telenovelas, fútbol, música, Twitter.... en español en español Teach (& learn) about something neither you nor your students know anything about. en español Teach math. en español For monolingual Spanish-speaking parents, this is a chance to help with homework! HLLs have access to native speakers all around them. Assign students to interview adults. Assign students to share their work with an adult. Invite parents to class. Encourage/volunteer student participation in community events. Give credit for language and literacy activities that take place outside of school. Assign reading books to younger siblings. Connect curriculum with local businesses, churches, organizations. Carreira, M. & Kagan, O. (2011). The results of the National Heritage Language Survey: Implications for teaching, curriculum design and professional development. Foreign Language Annals, 44(1), p. 40-64. HLLs actually make very few grammatical and orthographic "errors." Rather than teach general rules, tailor instruction to areas where students actually have trouble. Beaudrie, S. (2011). A corpus-based study on the misspellings of Spanish heritage learners and their implications for teaching, Linguistics and Education, 23, 135-144. Studies have found that less than 3% of HL speech contains "errors". Teach common spelling mistakes. Teach the diacritic accent. Teach comparative structures: differences in capitalization and punctuation between English and Spanish. If you must teach verb conjugations - remember that HLLs know instinctively how to form verbs - they do not know the names of structures. Teach them to identify verbs in the preterite, rather than transform infinitives Be patient.
Some errors are developmental. HLLs are tremendously diverse: a one-size-fits-all curriculum will fall flat. Rather than all students doing the same thing at the same time, find ways to differentiate and account for differing times needed for mastery: Stations Checklists Multi-step projects. Class projects with different roles to play. Opportunities for extra-practice and reteaching + chances to get ahead. Step-by-steps Peer-tutoring Language maintenance depends on the existence of real and varied opportunities for language use. Prepare performances: Plays
Skits Language fairs
Recitals
Demonstrations Prepare products: Newspaper/Newsletter
Literary magazine
Videos/PSAS
Translations
Letters to the editor
Voter's guides
Pamphlets Do simulations: Mock trial Student congress Museum exhibit Poetry slams Do real work: Provide a translation
service,
Volunteer in other classrooms. (Kagan & Dillon, 2009) HLLs need to develop & transfer academic literacy skills which will expand their bilingual range and support school success in English. Carriera, M. (2007). Spanish-for-native-speaker matters: Narrowing the Latino achievement gap through Spanish language instruction. Heritage Language Journal, (5)1, 147-171. Retrevied from http://www.international.ucla.edu/media/files/M_Crr_HLJ_5_1.pdf. Teach the writing process: Outline! Research! Peer-edit! Revise! Teach close reading: Make arguments & interpretations based on the text.
Cite! Teach oral presentation: Content + Organization +
Delivery Discuss! Debate! Carreira, M. & Kagan, O. (2011). The results of the National Heritage Language Survey: Implications for teaching, curriculum design and professional development. Foreign Language Annals, 44(1), p. 40-64. The diversity of existing proficiency levels for HLLs makes discreet item language assessments too difficult to design. Aim to document individual growth: Portfolios Pre & Post measures Skills over time Use rubrics: Evaluate general areas:
Organization
Ideas
Conventions Don't count up errors! Grade only what you want to measure: Grade content on content evaluations
Grade form on form evaluations HLLs are more sensitive to correction than some L2s Potowski, K. (2001). Educating university foreign language teachers to work with heritage Spanish speakers. In B. Johnston & S. Irujo (Eds.) Research and Practice in Language Teacher Education: Voices from the Field, Selected Papers from the First International Conference on Language Teacher Education, (pp. 87-100). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition. WORKS CITED Especially if you're a teacher working with heritage language learners and want to see examples of the curricular components I've mentioned.....
Full transcript