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Building Upon a Tradition of Catholic Faith

Celebrating 150 Years Diocese of La Crosse
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Diocese of La Crosse

on 15 November 2017

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Transcript of Building Upon a Tradition of Catholic Faith

- Bishop Michael Heiss - 1868–1880
- Bishop Kilian Flasch - 1881–1891
- Bishop James Schwebach - 1891-1921

The newly formed diocese included Native Americans and new arrivals from Ireland, Germany, French Canada, Poland, Bohemia and Italy.
Diocese of La Crosse in 1868
1868-1929
PUTTING DOWN ROOTS
Beginning in the 1850s, tens of thousands of European Immigrants made their way to Wisconsin. They came for many reasons and had varied backgrounds. Many were German, Irish, and Polish immigrants. Once in United States they struggled to keep their language and culture alive. Faith and the Church were the center of life.
1850s
It was assumed that Prairie du Chien was
the natural place for
the cathedral. The fur trade had waned and
La Crosse was becoming
a center for commerce
so the cathedral was located there.
SAINT JOSEPH CATHEDRAL in 1870
A bell for the new church was donated by Margaret Adams nee Misslich with money she made while operating a restaurant in San Francisco. At the end of the day, she would sweep the dirty floor, saving the dirt. She would separate the gold dust left by miners from the dirt. Margaret sold the gold dust and bought a bell, inscribed with her name, for the church.
Before Holy Cross Parish was built, Father Minwegan was a traveling priest who offered Masses in cabins and theaters. Anti-Catholic sentiment was rampant but despite continued harassment and suspicion that he might be a German spy, he continued to lead. His greatest challenge was the KKK. The KKK would burn a cross in an empty plot of land across from the priests residence whenever he was in town. Learning that the land was available for purchase, Father Minwegan bought the 10-acre lot for fifty dollars. Today, Holy Cross Church stands on that land.
Father Peter Minwegen - Cornell, 1920
CARE FOR GOD'S CREATION
Diocese of La Crosse in 1946
Rural Life
A NEW CATHEDRAL
1955 was Bishop Treacy's tenth year
in the Diocese of La Crosse. He announced his next big project:

"Before our ninety-year old Cathedral falls down, let us prayerfully review
the splendidly developed plans
Bishop McGavick [intended]."

The dedication of St. Joseph the Workman Cathedral was set for
May 14-19 1962.
As the new cathedral was being built in La Crosse, preparations for the Second Vatican Council were underway in Rome. Pope John XXII had announced the Council in 1959, and the first session opened on October 1962. The Council would gather more than 2,000 bishops from around the world to look at the Church's teachings and practices in a wide variety of areas.
The Second Vatican Council
VISIT FROM POPE
JOHN PAUL II
1983-2010
A FUTURE SAINT IN STEVENS POINT

In 1976, Karol Wojtyla, the Cardinal Archbishop of Krakow, visited Philadelphia for the International Eucharistic Congress. After the Congress was over, he proceeded
to a potato farm in Rosholt.
Cardinal Wojtyla had a strong interest in the Polish culture of the U.S., and accepted an invitation to deliver a
keynote address at the annual Lecture on Poland at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Along with Bishop Freking and Wisconsin Governor Lee Dreyfus, he paid a visit
to the Zdroik family farm.
1983-2010
- Bishop John Paul - 1983–1994
- Bishop Raymond Burke - 1995–2003
- Bishop Jerome Listecki - 2004–2010

In reaction to Vatican II, Bishop Paul called the Fourth Synod of the diocese from April 28 - May 1, 1987. This Synod was different because, for the first time, it involved lay people from around the diocese.
LIVING THE FAITH
HMONG AND HISPANIC
IMMIGRATION
- Hmong refugees first began to arrive in the
Midwest in 1975, following the end of the
Vietnam War and the Civil War in Laos.
- Bishop Paul welcomed the strangers with
open arms. Some La Crosse priests have learned
the Hmong language in order to minister more
effectively among them.
- Mexican immigrants and migrants have been
coming to Wisconsin since 1910
- In early 1950’s estimated that 12,000 migrant
workers came each summer to work in Wisconsin
- Latino communities formed in cities and became
links for subsequent migration
SYNOD 5
The Jubilee Year, 2000, would see the convening
of the Fifth Diocesan Synod.

“The Diocesan Synod, a longstanding and proven means of pastoral care and leadership for Bishops, seeks to study the entire life of the Church in the Diocese and the fidelity of the Church in the Diocese to the Way of our Lord
Jesus Christ, the obedience of the Church in the Diocese to the inspirations of the Holy Spirit.”

Every deanery and parish consultative body, as well as diocesan commissions, were invited to study and discuss “the essential aspects of Church life in our Diocese.”
Catholic School Unification
During this time, seven systems were established, consolidating individual parish schools in the same community. Students in the primary, intermediate and high school grades share a common purpose and mission.
BUILDING UP THE
BUILDING UP THE
KINGDOM OF GOD
KINGDOM OF GOD
- Bishop Alexander McGavick, D.D - 1921–1948
- Auxiliary Bishop William R. Griffin - 1935–1944
- Bishop John Treacy - 1948–1964
- Bishop Frederick Freking - 1965–1983

Due to the population growth in Wisconsin
and the stability of life after World War II,
the Diocese of Madison was formed on
January 9, 1946, leaving us with 19 counties.
1929-1983
The 1980s brought difficult times to the farm families, with economic fluctuations, government policy, high interest rates, and debt. Foreclosures forced many
to lose their farms.

In 2000, new challenges arose
in sustainable agriculture, environmental justice, climate change, and the world wide need for food. The National Rural Life Conference, and the diocesan bishops, work hard to make
sure these issues are addressed
in keeping with Catholic
social teaching.

With confidence in the presence and action of God in the world, the Catholic Diocese of La Crosse is a welcoming
and worshiping community of faith,
hope, and love. Called by the love of
Christ we recognize the Spirit of God
in one another and give witness to
the value of human life by mutual
respect and honor.
The First Cathedral
Aquinas - La Crosse
Assumption-Wisconsin Rapids
Columbus-Marshfield
McDonell-Chippewa Falls
Newman-Wausau
Pacelli-Stevens Point
Regis-Eau Claire
- Bishop William Patrick Callahan
2010–Present
Looking Forward
THE FATHER JOSEPH WALIJEWSKI LEGACY GUILD
SACRED WORSHIP
Calling everyone to form a community, to serve life, to participate in society and share in the life and mission of the Church.
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE
VOCATIONS
Padre Jose’s spirituality
is rooted in seeing Christ crucified in everyone he
met; especially the orphans, abandoned, marginalized and poor. Unwilling to turn and
walk away, Fr. Joe established parishes, soup kitchens and an orphanage to meet the basic needs of these people.
Fr. Joseph Walijewski Legacy Guild is
an association of people dedicated to furthering the cause of the Servant of God Fr. Joe, and providing continued support for the legacy he left behind.



God, in His great love, always speaks to us. God wants us to know Him and be close to Him. God wants to tell us the vocation He created us for.
Christ’s presence in the Eucharist is called “real,” Blessed Pope Paul VI taught, “because it is presence in the fullest sense: that is to say, it is a substantial presence by which Christ, God and man, makes Himself wholly and entirely present.”
NATIVITY OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY
Keyesville

Franciscan Sisters of Perpetual Adoration (FSPA)
Bishop Heiss arrived and discovered a diocese in need of schools. Bishop Heiss reached out to Mother Antonia who agreed to establish a motherhouse in La Crosse. In the years that followed, the sisters established perpetual adoration - praying continuously since August 1, 1878, a tradition held sacred today. They established western Wisconsin's first hospital, St. Francis, now known as Mayo Clinic Health System-Franciscan Healthcare, and Viterbo College, now known as Viterbo University.
The Sisters of St. Joseph, Third Order of St. Francis, Stevens Point
In 1901, forty-six women, members of the School Sisters of St. Francis located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, responded to the need to educate Polish immigrant families. By 1918, the Sisters were teaching in 23 schools in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana and Ohio. The order today is
engaged in the fields of health care, education, social justice, missionary work, work with the developmentally disabled, parish work, religious education, counceling services, spiritual direction and respite care.
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