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Physics Mini-Project

The physics of dance, figure skating, and gymnastics.

Maaron Tesfaye

on 12 March 2010

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Transcript of Physics Mini-Project

Physics Mini-Project By Maaron Tesfaye Figure Skating! Gymnastics! Dance! Thanks for watching! Gravity holds the dancer on the ground so that she will not float up. A normal force is applied by the ground, allowing the dancer to stand. A an applied force is applied to the dancer by the dancer, so that she can turn. Friction between the dancers foot and the floor causes the dancer to slow down, and eventually stop turning. The skater accelerates as he pushes harder and harder and gains more speed. The skater gains speed as he pushes his weight along the ice. Gravity causes the skater to come back down after jumping in the air. The skater's mass causes to come down from a jump faster than if he were as light as a feather. A balanced force occurs so that the dancer may complete a graceful turn without falling or stumbling. There will be an increase in the skater's velocity as he goes faster in a specific direction. The skater's potential energy increases as hejumps higher in the air but decreases as he comes down. A spring force causes the gymnast to be propelled into the air off of the spring board. A normal force is acting upon the beam so that it may stand on the ground. An applied force is put on the beam by the gymnast so that he may flip forward.
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