Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Confronting the Fake News Epidemic- CUA Symposium 2018

No description
by

Christina Heslink

on 17 February 2018

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Confronting the Fake News Epidemic- CUA Symposium 2018

80% to 90% of teenagers in a study by Wineburg and McGrew (2016) could not determine the difference between real and fake news.
OED names "Post-Truth" word of year
WEB 2.0 AND THE RETURN OF FAKE NEWS
INFORMATION WARFARE
Reading more information, less deeply (skimming/scanning)
Constant Barrage of Headlines: RSS (Real Simple Syndication) Feeds
Establishing an identity
Establishing a community based on common beliefs
Virtual recognition
Maria Thurber
Friday, February 2, 2018
Christina Heslink
A TALE AS OLD AS TIME
FAKE NEWS
NEXT STEP: SOURCE EVALUATION INSTRUCTION
1439
- Invention of the Gutenberg Printing Press

1890
- Yellow Journalism (Hearst and Pulitzer)

1896
- New York Times-
First "'facts'-based newspaper" purchased by Adolph Ochs

Association between "fact" and "news" grows as less and less reporting is sensational. Public begins to trust news to be objective.

2016
-
Brexit
2016 US Presidential Election
Recognize dual nature of users in the digital age (seekers and creators of information)
Help users understand responsible information use
CONFRONTING THE FAKE NEWS EPIDEMIC:
Source: Soll, J. (2016, December 18). The long and brutal history of fake news.
Politico Magazine
. Retrieved from http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/12/fake-news-history-long-violent-214535. Accessed 8 Sept. 2017.
1992-
Post-truth first used in writing

2015-2016-
2000% increase in media use of the term "post-truth" due to stories about Brexit and the US election
"circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in political debate or public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief"
-OED Online
Source: Albright, J. Welcome to the era of fake news.
Media and Communications
, 5(2), 87-89, doi: 10.16645/mac.v512.977.
Social Media: Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc.
Creation of "Ideological Echo Chambers" (Albright, J.)
Sharing information without actually reading it
Quick and convenient access to information
Source: Zimming, L. (2005) Reading behavior in the digital environment: Changes in reading behavior over the past ten years,
Journal of Documentation,
Vol. 61 Issue 6: pp. 700-712. doi: 10.1108/00220410510632040.
Source: Crocco, M. Halvorsen, A., Jacobsen, R., & Segall, A. (2017) Teaching with evidence: In the age of fake news, students need to be able to assess the trustworthiness of evidence- especially when deliberating thorny public policy issues. Phi Delta Kappan 98(7), 67. doi: 10.1177/0031721717702635.
Image Credit: Flikr via Creative Commons

Sources: Rochlin, N. (2017). Fake news: Belief in post-truth.
Library Hi Tech
, 35(3), 386-392. doi:10.1108/LHT-03-2017-0062.
Fact-checking viewed as virtual persecution
Devotion and commitment to real and virtual communities
Source: Johnson, B. (2017). Information literacy is dead: The role of libraries in a post-truth world.
Computers in Libraries
. 37(2), pp. 12-15. Retrieved from https://search-proquest.com.proxycu.wrcl.org/docview/1891747111?accountid-9940.
Photo Credit: Pixabay via Creative Commons
Teach students how to think critically about information
Teach students how to evaluate information sources in the digital age
CRAAPs Test, 2010 Meriam Library of CSU Chico
IFLA's How to spot fake news
Sources: OED Online

Wang, A.B. (2016, November 16). 'Post-truth' named 2016 word of the year by Oxford dictionaries.
The Washington Post
. Retrieved from https://www.thewashingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/11/16/post-truth-named-2016-word-of-the-year-by-oxford-dictionaries/?utm_term=.02584c93b8df. Accessed 8 Sept. 2017.
Sources: Batchelor, O. (2017). Getting out the truth: The role of libraries in the fight against fake news.
Reference Services Review
, 45(2), 143. doi: 10.1108/RSR-03-2017-0006.

Crate, L. (2017). Fake News vs. real news: How do we teach ourselves and our students to know the difference?
Education Digest
, 83(1), 4. Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.proxycu/wrcl.org/docview/1932059651?accountid-9940.
Brief History of the Web
Source: Calaresu, M. and Shiri, A. (2014). Understanding Semantic Web: a conceptual model.
Library Review,
64 (1/2), 82-100, doi: 10.1108/LR-09-2014-0097.
Web 1.0 (1993)
Focus on connecting documents for researchers and colleagues
Web 2.0 (2005)
Focus on "community-driven Web applications"
Shift to consumer/producer paradigm; rise of user-generated content
Consumer based; information viewed as static and proprietary
Advent of Social Media
Myspace
Facebook
YouTube
Twitter
Instagram
Skype/Facetime
Wikipedia
Google Docs
HISTORY, USER INFORMATION BEHAVIOR, NEXT STEPS
“a knowingly false headline and story written and published on a website that is designed to look like a real news site, and is spread via social media”
-Rochlin (2017)
Image Credit: IFLA - https://www.ifla.org/publications/node/11174
California State University, Chico. (2010). CRAAP Test. Retrieved from https://www.csuchico.edu/lins/handouts/eval_websites.pdf. Accessed 1 February 2018.
Full transcript