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Modal Verbs

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by

Adriana Morales

on 4 October 2014

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Transcript of Modal Verbs

Are special verbs that are used to show obligation, possibility, ability and permission.
MODALS VERBS
The modals Verbs are:
OBLIGATION
Have (got)to
Can/Be allowed to
Ought to
Must
Should
REQUESTS
Can
Could
Will
Would
OFFERS
Will
Shall/Should
HAVE TO
Have to is
not
a modal verb
In general, "have to" expresses a strong
impersonal obligation
. The subject of have to is obliged or forced to act by a separate, external power (for example, the Law or school rules).
Have got is common in british, but it is more informal than
have to
Have to expresses a general repeated obligation.
Don't/doesn't have to expresses absence of obligation. (it isn't necessary)
EXAMPLE
My children
have to
go to school until they are 16 (a law)
I
've got
to go now. See you!
The soup
has to
be stirred continuously to prevent burning.
They
have to
leave early.
CAN/
BE ALLOWED TO
Can is a modal verb
Can and be allowed to express permission
Can is more informal and usually spoken
EXAMPLE
You
can
borrow my bike, but you
can't
have the car. I need it.
You'
re allowed to
get married when you're 16
SHOULD, OUGHT TO, MUST
Should and ought to express mild obligation, or advice. They express what in the speaker, is the right or best thing to do. We often use them with I think / I don't think...
EXAMPLE
WOULD
Is most commonly used to create conditional verb forms. It also serves as the past form of the modal verb "will", no past of future form. Additionally, "would" can indicate repetition in the past.
Is more polite than will.
EXAMPLE
If he were an actor, he
would
be in adventure movies.
I knew that she
would
be very successful in her career.
When they first met, they
would
always have picnics on the beach.
COULD
Is used to express possibility or
past
ability as well as to make suggestions and requests. "Could" is also commonly used in conditional sentences as the conditional form of "can."
EXAMPLE
Extreme rain
could
cause the river to flood the city.
Nancy
could
ski like a pro by the age of 11.
You
could
see a movie or go out to dinner.
Could
I use your computer to email my boss?
We
could
go on the trip if I didn't have to work this weekend.
CAN
Is one of the most commonly used modal verbs in English. It can be used to express ability or opportunity, to request or offer permission, and to show possibility or impossibility
in the present
.
EXAMPLE
I
can
ride a horse.
We
can
stay with my brother when we are in Paris.
She
cannot
stay out after 10 PM.
Can
you hand me the stapler?
Any child
can
grow up to be president.
MAY
Is most commonly used to express possibility. It can also be used to give or request permission to do something
in the present,
although this usage is becoming less common.
EXAMPLE
Cheryl
may
be at home, or perhaps at work.
Johnny, you
may
leave the table when you have finished your dinner.
May
I use your bathroom?
Is most commonly used to express possibility. It is also often used in conditional sentences. English speakers can also use "might" to make suggestions or requests.
Is

less possible than may.
MIGHT
EXAMPLE
Your purse
might
be in the living room.
If I didn't have to work, I
might
go with you.
You
might
visit the botanical gardens during your visit.
Might
I borrow your pen?
Review
MODALS
VERBS

Ask
Obligation
Posibility
Ability
Have
to
Must
Should
Would
Could
Can
May
Might
Subject + modal + verb + rest of the sentence.
Structure
(Past)
(Past)
(Present)
(Present)
(Less possible
than may)
SHOULD, OUGHT TO, MUST
You're always asking me for money. I think you
should
spend less.
You
shouldn't
sit so close of the television! It's bad for your eyes.
You
ought to
be more careful with your money.
Should I/she/we...? is possible. We often use
Do you think...?
SHOULD, OUGHT TO, MUST
Must, like have to, express strong obligation. Must expresses an obligation that involves the speaker's opinion it's personal.
SHOULD, OUGHT TO, MUST
Must is also associated with a formal written style.
EXAMPLE

Should I
see a doctor?
Do you think I should see a doctor?
EXAMPLE
I
must
get my hair cut.
(This is me talking to me)
You
must
go and visit your grandmother.
(A parent talking to a child)
EXAMPLE
All visitors
must
show proper ID.
(Sign in the lobby of an office building)
Books
must
be returned on or before due date
(Instructions in a library)
Full transcript