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Citing Text Evidence and Making Inferences

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by

Anna Zudell

on 24 March 2015

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Transcript of Citing Text Evidence and Making Inferences

Citing Text Evidence and Making Inferences
An Introduction
We START with what we know
Schema: information that we already know that comes from our brain.
And, at the peak, in our final, triumphant step!
We make an inference.
An inference connects what we are reading (text and evidence in the text) to what we already know (schema) to give us new meaning.
NEXT, we add what we find in the texts
Evidence is a clue or clues that you find in a story or stories.
Then . . .
We remember that text is just written words. Any kind of written words. Like these written words here.
Two Types of Evidence
Implicit
Reading between the lines.

Not told, need to make meaning based on clues in the text.
Explicit
Clear and obvious
When the author tells you information in the text.
And then we put what we know together with the evidence found in what we are reading and . . . voila!
Full transcript