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Treaty of Waitangi

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krisieta mcqueen

on 7 November 2012

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Transcript of Treaty of Waitangi

Different areas Effected by the
Treaty The Treaty of Waitangi Politics Alcohol Loss of
land Land (Whenua) Whenua land and Placenta
Tangata Whenua (people of the land)
Folktale tells story of earth mother and sky father
Using land to identify who we are and where we are from Land Ownership and Legislation Colonists eager to own land
1860 land war
Te Tiriti o Waitangi article (the breeches)
Introduced legislation HOW WAS ALCOHOL INTRODUCED TO MAORI?
•Trading in The Bay of Islands
•Concerns by Government Officials
•Introduced by European

HOW DID MAORI GET INFLUENCED TO SIGN THE TREATY OF WAITANGI?
•Influenced by Missionaries
•Key Factor
•Treaty of Waitangi

WHY WAS MAORI CUSTOMS ABANDONDED AND ALTERED?
•Effort and Support
•Expectations
•Own Maori Customs
•Cultural Identity
•Education System WHAT ARE THE STATISTICS ON THE AFFECTS OF ALCOHOL IN TODAY’S SOCIETY?
• Alcohol related to Death
• Alcohol related to Injuries
• Alcohol relating to Violent Crimes
• Alcohol relating to Car Accidents

• THE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL ON THE BODY?
• Effects of Alcohol on the body
• How to avoid these effects
• Problems with drinking Whanau's were forced to break away and become independent This meant that generations now miss out on the teachings of their elders due. Missionaries opened schools
Maori were trained to be domestic help rather than educated.
It was also illegal to speak Te Reo in schools Te Reo early diet and sources of food
arriival of europeans and new foods
reasons for not eating healthy
health problems
significance to nursing Food Identity How has the treaty affected Maori in today’s society? Our Question 1835 – Maori declare sovereignty through the Declaration of independence.
1837-1839 - British government toyed with forms of indirect rule such as protectorate and partial sovereignty over the European settlers.
6 February 1840 - Initial signing of treaty.
21 May 1840 - Hobson proclaims sovereignty over North Island by cession and South Island by discovery.
16 June 1840 – Laws of NSW applied to NZ through NSW act. The Sacking of Parihaka
November 5th
Arresting of Te Whiti and his fellow chief Tohu by Pakeha invaders.
-Troops invaded the village
-Looking for arms
-Village ransacked
-Women rapped subsequently contracting syphilis
-Houses demolished
-Crops destroyed
-Nearly 1500 Maori forced back to tribal reserve lands.
-Villages faced starvation
-Forced to ultimate humiliation of seeking work on construction of roads which they had previously opposed. -Te Whiti and Tohu briefly trialled but found to have commited no crime.
-Indefinite imprisonment and re-arest without charge at any time.
Slide 4
2004 Foreshore and Seabed act
-Law created in 2004 by Labour Government
-98% of Maori would not meet threshold to claim customary rights.
18th of November 2004
-The Labour government passed the Foreshore and Seabed Act
-Declared that the land in question was owned by the Crown.
-Māori can apply for "guardianship" of certain areas. Background Information A significant impact that occurred post signing of the Treaty was the loss of identity for the tangata whenua of Aotearoa.

Identity is a major determinant for Maori. It gave them place of standing, knowing who they were, where they come from, how to execute traditions from their ancestors and how to pass them on to their future generations.

The arrival of Pakeha, slowly diminished these beliefs and customs and oppressed with their own. Incidences where many people’s ancestors were beaten for speaking their native tounge and forced to speack a language that was not theirs by birthright has been heard in many whanau histories. Language is part of a cultures identity and when you lose or in the case of Maori have, the language removed, the identity of that culture too becomes diluted and eventually almost lost.

Fortunately for Aotearoa, Maori have managed to regain some of the language that was lost, starting in the kohanga movement (language nest) in the 1980’s, through to the establishment of Kura Kaupapa Maori (primary schooling) and most recently, Whare Kura (Secondary Schooling). There are also many wananga (tertiary education providers) both formal and informal today.
Francine 11349079
Cherale 09293019
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