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Biological Diversity Spring 2013

Global Climate Change
by

Jessica Green

on 1 May 2013

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Transcript of Biological Diversity Spring 2013

Global Climate Change 4.21.2013 James Hansen: Why I must speak out about climate change Geographic Range Shifts Edith's Checkerspot Butterfly Over the previous 100 years entire range of the butterfly had moved northward and to higher elevations.

80 % populations in Mexico and Southern California disappeared. Parmesan Nature 1996 Populations in Mexico 4 times as likely to be extinct than Canada

Net extinctions significantly increased with altitude Disruption Biological Cycles Springtime breeding
Nesting
Bud bursts
Migration Root et al. 2003. Negative number reflects shift toward earlier onset of event. Warming sea surface temperatures cause coral reefs to loose symbiotic algae and appear "bleached" Warming & Acidifying Oceans Acidification also threatens coral reefs Melting Sea Ice Golden Toad Extinctions Monteverde cloud forest Costa Rica
Small geographic range (4 km^2)
Last seen 1989
Depend on heavy mountain mists
Climate change pushed mist levels up away from breeding area Paul Gilding: the Earth is Full Red = extinct
Blue = present Sites where previously recorded populations still existed were on average 2 degrees further north than sites where populations were extinct.











Populations above 2,400 m significantly more persistent than those at all lower elevations. Science 2008 24 days per decade earlier for breeding of North American common murre 6 days per decade later for breeding of North American Fowler's toad Peter Diamandis: abundance is our future
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