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Adjective Clauses

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by

thimy herrera

on 29 January 2015

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Transcript of Adjective Clauses

Interests
Education
Skills
Experience
References
Telephone
Email Address
City, State
.
.
Example:
Adjective Clauses
In most case the adjective clause

directly follows the noun

(or pronoun) it is identifying.
Adjective Clauses

can also identify or describe
indefinite pronouns
such as
one, someone, somebody, something,another,
and other (s).
Example:
Grammar Notes
Adjective Clauses
Focus on Grammar
Leydi Cieza Vega
Thimy Herrera Angulo

Use
adjective clauses
to identify or give
additional informatio
n

about nouns (
people, places
,
or
things
).
Sentences with adjective clauses
can be seen as a combination of two sentences.
Example:
Adjective clauses begin with
relative pronouns
.
Subject relative pronouns can be
who, that, which,
and

whose
.
Relative pronouns have the same form
whether they refer to singular or plural nouns, or to males or females.
Use
who
or
that

to refer to
people
.
Use
which
or
that
to
refer to
places
or
things
.
Do not use
a subject pronoun ( I, you, he, she, we, they) and a subject relative pronoun in the same adjective clause.
Example:
Use
whose + noun
to
show
possession
or

relationship
Example:
The verb in the adjective clause is singular
if the subject relative pronoun refers to a singular noun.
It is plural
if it refers to a plural noun.
When whose + noun
is the subject of an adjective clause, the verb agrees with the subject of the adjective clause.
There are two kinds of adjective clauses,
identifying
and
nonidentifying

(sometimes called restrictive and nonrestrictive).
Do not use commas
with this kind of adjective clause.
Use an
identifying
adjective clause to identify
which member of
a group the sentence talks about.
The adjective clause
is necessary
to
identify which friend.
Use a
nonidentifying
adjective clause to give
additional information
about the noun it refers to. The information
is not necessary
to identify the noun.
Use a commas
before
and after the adjective clause
Do not use that
to introduce nonidentifying adjective clauses. Use
who
for people and
wich
for places and thing.
Adjective clauses with subject relative pronouns
Adjective Clauses After The Main Clause
Adjective Clauses After The Main Clause
I know a friend
who lives in Germany
.
(The clause

who lives in Germany

identifies my friend
)
Lima, which is my hometown, is very dirty.
(
The clause

which is my hometown

gives additional information about Lima
)
I want to meet
someone who helps me in all areas of my life.
I have a friend + she goes shopping with me.
=
I have a friend
who goes shopping with me
.
Miguel is someone
who knows
the meaning of friend.
Not
Miguel is someone who he knows the meaning of friend.
-
z
I have a
friend who
lives in Colombia.
I have a
friend that
lives in Colombia.
Cuzco is a
city

which
attracts a lot of people.
Cuzco is a
city that
attracts a lot of people.
She is my
friend whose
parents are from Italy.
He is the
man who
helps my mother everyday.
That's the
woman who
lives in my neighborhood.
Those are the
people who
play basket all the time.
Mario is my
friend who
lives in Piura.
Pedro and Eli are my
friends who
live in Piura.
Example:
Example:
Jose is a person
whose friends are
important to him.
Not
Jose is a person whose friends is important to
him.
-
I have a lot of friends. My friend
who lives in Piura
visits me often.
I have a lot of friends. My best friend
, who lives in Piura,
visits me often.
Full transcript