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Honey Mushroom

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by

Alex Prikockis

on 3 March 2016

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Transcript of Honey Mushroom

Appearance
Photos
Survival Needs
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Like most other fungi, I reproduce using spores. I do not move, however my underground hyphae system can cover a large area. I usually feed on dead wood, acting as a decomposer. Us Honey Mushrooms are great wood decomposers. We can also sometimes be parasites, feeding on living trees and shrubs.
Animal Relationships
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Predators:
Eastern Box Turtle
Eastern Gray Squirrel
Leopard Slug
Horned Fungus Beetle
Fungus Gnat
Eastern Chipmunk
White-tailed Deer
Snow Flea
Soil Mite
White-footed Mouse
People*
Kingdom - Fungi
Phylum - Basidomycota
Class - Hymenomycetes
Order - Agaricales
Family - Physalacriaceae
Genus - Armillariella (honey mushrooms)
Species -
Armillariella mellea
Lives In
Northern parts of North America, Europe, and Asia. I'm often found at the base of deciduous trees (trees that lose leaves in fall.) I can also be found on stumps and wood. I can be found either alone or a large cluster.
Classification
Sources
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Honey Mushroom
Information:

http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/honey_mushroom.htm
http://www.mssf.org/cookbook/honey.html
http://www.messiah.edu/oakes/fungi_on_wood/gilled%20fungi/species%20pages/Armillaria%20mellea.htm
http://michiganmushroomhunters.org/Mushrooms/Featured%20mushrooms%20by%20month/November/Mushroom%20November%2009.htm
http://www.bio.brandeis.edu/fieldbio/Edible_Plants_Ramer_Silver_Weizmann/Pages/spp_page_Armillariella_mellea.html


Pictures:

123rf.com
arkive.org
http://www.asergeev.com/pictures/archives/compress/2013/1292/01.htm
michiganmorels.com
https://nhgardensolutions.wordpress.com/tag/brown-jelly-fungus/
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Armillaria_mellea,_Honey_Fungus,_UK_1.jpg
wildmushroomhunting.orga

Oval shaped yellowish or rusty brown cap (1-4 inches wide.) Whitish gills that turn yellow and then reddish as I age. Stalk can grow up to 6 inches high and 3/4 inch wide.
Although I am safe to eat, there are many dangerous and even deadly mushrooms that look just like me. Even us Honey Mushrooms can cause stomachaches in some people. Do not eat a mushroom unless an expert tells you it's safe. (Actually, on second thought, don't eat mushrooms at all! Please don't kill me, I really am a fun guy!)
Horned Fungus Beetles, Fungus Gnats, Snow Fleas, and Soil Mites may use us Honey Mushrooms as shelter, as well as food. Once, a Fungus Beetle stayed in me for a solid week. I was glad when he moved out, he was stinky!
Sometimes, us Honey Mushrooms can also have a mutualistic relationship with a tree or shrub, sharing soil nutrients.
^
my cousin Bob
By Alex Prikockis
Pictures
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