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Verb Tenses

A presentation about verb tenses and how they are used.
by

Talia Dixon

on 17 April 2013

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Transcript of Verb Tenses

For example:







I had lived in Calgary before I moved to Ottawa. What are they
and how do we use them? Present Tense Past Tense Future Tense Past Perfect Future Perfect Continuous Thank you for watching
my Prezi on verb tenses! Present tense means that you are talking about
something that is happening right at that moment. You use past tense when you are talking about
a past and completed action. You use future tense when you are talking about
something that will definitely happen in the
future. You use present continuous to describe something
that is in the process of going on right at that moment. Past perfect is used when you are describing two events that are in the past, and one is
farther in the past than the other. Future perfect continuous is used to show that a
future event will be going on until another specific event or time arrives. Well first off,
when you change
the tense of a verb,
you are modifying it
so that it makes sense
in the period of time
that the sentence takes
place in. There are many
different verb tenses,
but the principal verb
tenses are in the past,
present, and future. Over the course
of this presentation,
I will explain a bit about
the more complex verb
tenses as well. For example: I have a sandwich. The verb is to have.
-I have
-You have
-He/She has
-We have
-You (plural) have
-They have You can also use
the present tense
in the negative form. For example: I do not have a sandwich. By adding the
words "do not"
in front of the verb,
the sentence becomes
negative. But what would
happen if you ate
the sandwich so that
it no longer existed? For example:
If you ate that sandwich,
then you would be
describing it in the past tense. I had a sandwich. The verb is still to have, but
it has changed tenses so that
the verb becomes had.
-I had
-You had
-He/She had
-We had
-You (plural) had
-They had When you change a verb that
is in past tense to the negative
form, it gets a little more complicated. You take the root verb which in this case is have,
and you add the words did not in front of it.

I did not have a sandwich. When you put most regular verbs into
past tense, you would just take the
root verb and add "ed" to the end of it.
(like- liked, jump- jumped)
Although there are a few exceptions to
this rule. For example, the root verb
to sleep would become slept. People make
many grammatical errors in writing because
of this rule. The most common mistakes include
writing "spelt" instead of spelled and "snuck"
instead of sneaked. For a more detailed
description on the past
tense of verbs, watch this
helpful video. So you have
eaten the sandwich,
but now you are thinking
about making another one
one in the future? Which tense
would you use then? For example:
You just take the root verb
and add will in front of it to
change it to future tense.

-I will have
-You will have
-He/ She will have
-We will have
-You (plural) will have
-They will have. I will have a sandwich. The other way of changing a sentence
to future tense is that instead of using
the word will, you would use the verb
to be in the correct present tense,
followed by "going to" and then the
main verb.

For example:
I am going to have a sandwich. Now if you want to change the
sentence to negative, all you
have to do is add the word "not".

For example:
I will not have a sandwich
I am not going to have a sandwich. It is all pretty straight forward.
You modify the root verb so
that it makes sense in the tense
that the sentence takes place in.
If you want to change the sentence
to negative, all you have to do is add
the word "not". I good way to visualize verb tenses is
in a timeline. Past Present Future You can change the tenses of
both regular and irregular verbs.

Common regular verbs:
-To jump
-To play
-To like
-To dance
-to sing Common irregular verbs:
-To be
-To have
-To go The tenses of regular verbs are
normally quite similar to the
root verb. When changed to past
tense, "ed" is usually added to the
end of the verb.


To like:
I like
You like
He/ She likes
We like
You (plural) like
They like

The tenses of irregular verbs can
sometimes look nothing like the
root verb. To like past tense:
I liked
You liked
He/ She liked
We liked
You (Plural) liked
They like For example:
To be:
I am
You are
He/ She is
We are
You (plural) are
They are To be past tense:
I was
You were
He/ She was
We were
You (Plural) were
They were Now,
on to
some
more
complex
verb
tenses. For example: I am singing. Present Continuous. You are in the middle of
singing right at that very
moment, so you would use
present continuous. You just
add the correct present tense
form of the verb "to be" and then
take the root verb that you are using
and add the prefix "ing".

-I am singing
-You are singing
-He/She is singing
-We are singing
-You (plural) are singing
-They are singing But what if you were not
singing? Then, you would use the
negative form.
For example: I am not
singing. The sentence becomes negative
by adding the word "not". The two main verbs in
this sentence are to live
and to move. The event
that is farthest in the past
is "I had lived in Calgary"
because it is used after the
word "before". The second
event is "I moved to Ottawa".
The word "before" signifies
the difference in time between
each event. When you are using the negative form, the
word "because" is normally used in the
place of "before".

For example: First event
I could not finish my homework in time
because I had procrastinated too long. Here are some other examples:

1. I had three cats before we got a hamster.
2. I did not need to buy my lunch because I
brought my own.
3. I did not need a ticket for the train because I
drove instead. For example:







I will have been waiting for an hour before
the bus comes. This example deals with both a time and an
event happening to interrupt the first
event which is, "I will have been waiting". The second event is "the bus comes", the time is "for an hour" and the word that separates the two events is "before". Another way that future perfect continuous
sentences can be written is with the correct
present tense form of the verb "to be" followed
by "going to".

For example:
I am going to have been waiting for an hour before
the bus comes. This can also be written in negative
form by adding the word "not".

-I will have not been waiting for an hour
before the bus comes.
-I am not going to have been waiting for
an hour before the bus comes. I hope this was
helpful to you. Resources:
-englishpage.com
-Google images (Images)
-YouTube (Learn the
Past Tense
by: mesenglish) Verb Tenses
Full transcript