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Canyon English 11 Huck Finn Quotes

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by

C. Arevalo

on 11 December 2012

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Transcript of Canyon English 11 Huck Finn Quotes

"We blowed out a cylinder-head"
"Good gracious! anybody hurt?"
"No'm. Killed a nigger" Chapter 32 It was the most astonishing speech I ever heard - and I'm bound to say Tom Sawyer fell considerable in my estimation. Only I couldn' believe it. Tom Sawyer a nigger-stealer! Chapter 33 "Work? Why, cert'nly it would work, like rats a-fighting. But it's too blame' simple; there ain't noting to it. What's the good of a plan that ain't no more trouble than that? It's as mild as goosemilk." Chapter 34 Chapter 31 "All right, then, I'll go to hell" Chapter 35 By rights I reckon we ought to be a couple of years; but we can't. Things being so uncertain, what I recommend is this: that we really dig right in, as quick as we can; and after that, we can let on, to ourselves, that we was at it thirty-seven years. Chapter 36 "Well," he says, "there's an excuse for picks and letting on in a case like this; if it wasn't so, I wouldn't approve of it, nor I wouldn't stand by and see the rules broke - because right is right and wrong is wrong , and a body ain't got no business doing wrong when he ain't ignorant and knows better." Chapter 37 My heart fell down into my lungs and livers and things, and a hard piece of corn-crust started down my throat after it and got met on the road with a cough, and was shot across the table, and took one of the children in the eye and curled him up like a fishing-worm, and let a cry out of him the size of a war-whoop, and Tom he turned kinder blue around the gills, and it all amounted to a considerable state of things for about a quarter of a minute or as much as that, and I would 'a' sold out for half price if there was a bidder. Chapter 38 "On the scutcheon we'll have a bend or in the dexter base, a saltire murrey in the fess, with a dog, couchant, for common charge, and under his foot a chain embattled, for slavery, with a chevron vert in a chief engrailed, and three invected lines on a field azure, with the nombril points rampant on a dancette indented; crest, a runaway nigger, sable, with his bundle over his shoulder on a bar sinister; a couple of gules for supporters, which is you and me; motto, Maggiore fretta, minore atto. Got it out of a book - means the more haste the less speed." Chapter 39 So the thing was working very well, Tom said; he said he never see a thing work more satisfactory. He said it showed it was done right. Chapter 40 His eyes just blazed; and he says:
"No! - is that so? Ain't it bully! Why, Huck, if it was to do over again, I bet I could fetch two hundred! If we could put it off till--" Chapter 41 Laws knows I wanted to go bad enough to see about Tom, and was all intending to go; but after that I wouldn't 'a' went, not for kingdoms. Chapter 42 So there I had to stick plumb until daylight this morning; and I never see a nigger that was a better nuss or faithfuler and yet he was risking his freedom to do it, and was all tired out too, and I see plain enough he'd been worked main hard lately Chapter the Last And he said, what he had planned in his head from the start, if we got Jim out all safe, was for us to run him down the river on the raft, and have adventures plumb to the mouth of the river, and then tell him about his being free, and take him back up home on a steamboat, in style, and pay him for his lost time, and write word ahead and get out all the niggers around, and have them waltz him into town with a torchlight procession and a brassband, and then he would be a hero, and so would we. But I reckoned it was about as well the way it was.
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