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The Roots of Argumentative Writing

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by

Kelley Dutra

on 4 December 2015

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Transcript of The Roots of Argumentative Writing

The Roots of Argumentative Writing
Quick Review
Look over notes from yesterday on opinions vs. claims.
Choose a side: guilty or innocent?
Work in your group to build a claim.
Claims vs. Opinions
Monkeys are the coolest animal at the zoo.
Identifying Claims in Text
1. Read the article.
Give One, Get One: Claim vs. Opinion
2. Exchange claim and opinion facts with your partners orally.
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives

2. Give one, get one: Claim vs. Opinion

3. Practice: identify claims and opinions in informational text.
Objective
In this lesson we will . . .

identify claims in argumentative writing using our notes.
3. Fill in the blanks in the facts that your partners give you.
4. Class discussion.
1. Walk until the music stops.
Quickwrite
How do you feel about writing?
Is writing enjoyable for you?
When did it really start becoming enjoyable or not enjoyable?
Why is it enjoyable or not enjoyable?
If you had to write, what would you enjoy writing about?
Identifying Claims and Opinions
Practice!
Twinkies are delicious.



The governor has continually done the community a disservice by mishandling money, focusing on frivolous causes, and failing to listen to his constituents.

I like dance music.
I think Virginia Woolf is better than James Joyce.

The governor is a bad man.
Twinkies taste better than other snack cakes because of their texture, their creamy filling, and their golden appearance.
Dance music has become popular for reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the music; rather, the clear, fast beats respond to the need of the dancers and to move quickly.
Virginia Woolf is a more effective writer than James Joyce because she does not rely on
elaborate language devices that ultimately confuse and alienate the reader.
Write two opinions of your own and turn them into claims.
Your Turn!
Ideas:
How do you feel about the school's promise to give you iPads for months now?
What do you think about the holidays?
How do you feel about the vacation time the school gives you?
what do you think about the length of lunch and break times in school?
O
C
O
C
O
C
O
C
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives

2. Claims Vs. opinions review

3. "Slip or Trip" murder mystery
Objective
In this lesson we will . . .

Create claims using evidence provided in text and in images.
Bottom Line
Claims are opinions supported by evidence that can be argued about.
Opinions alone cannot be argued.
1. Observe the scene and the text.
2. Fill in graphic organizer with evidence and rules.
3. Make a claim that convicts the suspect or proves her innocent.
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives

2. Identify claims in writing

3. Write claims
Extra Practice
The vacation time at school should be changed.
This is all nonsense!
Summer is a more enjoyable season than winter because you can enjoy the outdoors without wearing your whole closet at one time.
There should be a foggy day schedule every day of winter to cut down on tardies since the dull weather tempts us to sleep in and come late to school.
O
O
C
O
C
2. Identify and underline the claim.
3. Check to make sure it is arguable and gives reasons or evidence.
Pair-Share
Your Turn!
Work independently to write claims for the opinions given.
Remember:
Claims are opinions supported by evidence that can be argued about.
Opinions alone cannot be argued.
Objectives
In this lesson we will . . .

identify claims in argumentative writing using whiteboards.

Create claims from opinions using our notes.
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives

2. Claims in text practice

3. Notes on ethos, pathos, and logos

4. Ethos, pathos, and logos practice
Objectives
In this lesson we will . . .

identify claims in argumentative writing using whiteboards.

differentiate between ethos, pathos, and logos using our notes.
Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
What makes an effective argument?
What is ethos?
Ethos is a Greek word for "an appeal to ethics."
When you appeal to someone's ethics, you are asking them to pay attention to their sense of duty or responsibility.
Ex: The school is not a trash can. Do your part in keeping the campus clean.
What is pathos?
Pathos is a Greek word for "an appeal to emotions."
When you appeal to someone's emotions, you are asking them to pay attention to what others are feeling as well as themselves.
Ex: Little children starve to death every year in Africa. A penny a day could change their lives for the better. Please help.
What is logos?
Logos is a Greek word for "an appeal to logic."
When you appeal to someone's logic you are asking them to pay attention to what makes the best sense.
Ex: Dial soap kills 99.9% of germs.
Use statistics, facts, research.
Use stories, pictures, music.
Use success stories, "why me?" stories, track records.
Answer the essential question in at least 3 sentences.
Identify Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
Argument Vs. Persuasion
WRITE THIS DOWN!
Persuasive writing can make equal use of ethos, pathos, and logos.
Argument writing will make equal use of ETHOS and LOGOS. Only a HINT of PATHOS may be used if any.
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives

2. Ethos, pathos, logos (notes review)

3. Ethos, pathos, logos (activity)

4. Ethos, pathos, logos (worksheet)
Identify Ethos, Pathos, Logos
Review and Extra Practice
Take out your worksheet from last time.
Objective
In this lesson we will . . .

differentiate between ethos, pathos, and logos using our notes.
Find Someone Who . . .
knows the definition of ethos. (1)
can give an example of pathos. (2)
can explain logos in their own words.
can explain the difference between a claim and an opinion.
(3)
Take out notes on ethos, pathos, and logos.
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives

2. Identify ethos, pathos and logos in ads

3. Outline advertisement
Advertisements
Are they arguments?
YES!
Slip or Trip?
Create Your Own!
Make your own advertisement argument for a product you use.
This will be a test grade!
Objective
In this lesson we will . . .

apply our knowledge of ethos, pathos, and logos by creating AND PRESENTING an advertisement.
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives

2. Clean out folders

3. Create advertisements
Agenda
1. Planners and objectives (3 minutes)

2. Finish ads and clean-up (30 minutes)

3. Presentations (5 min)
Presentations
In assigned groups of four. . .
1 minute presentations.
Introduce your product
Read the ad
Point out the elements (pictures, words, and/or color) that create the appeal you chose.
Why? Arguments should be more fact oriented. It provides a firmer foundation.

Expert opinion also falls into this category.
Ex: Beats by Dre (Dre is supposedly an expert on what music should sound like, why wouldn't you believe he produced the best headphones?)
This also appeals to self-image. You want to be a good citizen so people think highly of you.
Full transcript