Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

An English Specialists' Literacy Challenge

A Teaching Leaders Literacy Prezi, Term 1 2012 Cohort
by

Tim Howarth

on 26 September 2012

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of An English Specialists' Literacy Challenge

'The limits of my language mean the limits of my world'
Wittgenstein 1922 Literacy - a key to success By the end of the session you will have:
Extended your personal impact in leading literacy from your school to the whole of the TL movement.
Developed a better understanding of the range of literacy strategies that support pupils’ learning and how best to lead on literacy within your own and others' areas.
Used the Teaching Leaders Literacy Toolkit.
Created innovative multimedia resources to have impact on the development of literacy in every TL school. You are a guru already But why me? If the balloons popped, the sound wouldn’t be able to carry since then everything would be too far away from the correct floor. A closed window would also prevent the sound from carrying since most buildings tend to be well insulated. Since the operation depends on the steady flow of electricity, a break in the middle of the wire would also cause problems. Of course, the fellow could shout but the human voice is not loud enough to carry that far. An additional problem is that the string could break on the instrument. Then there would be no accompaniment to the message. It is clear that the best solution would involve less distance. Then there would be fewer potential problems. With face to face contact, the least number of things could go wrong. What's the passage all about? If the balloons popped, the sound wouldn’t be able to carry since then everything would be too far away from the correct floor. A closed window would also prevent the sound from carrying since most buildings tend to be well insulated. Since the operation depends on the steady flow of electricity, a break in the middle of the wire would also cause problems. Of course, the fellow could shout but the human voice is not loud enough to carry that far. An additional problem is that the string could break on the instrument. Then there would be no accompaniment to the message. It is clear that the best solution would involve less distance. Then there would be fewer potential problems. With face to face contact, the least number of things could go wrong... So what's the point here? Task:
You have 3 minutes to discuss the question
One group will be chosen to feed back their ideas
The other groups will then be asked to develop the ideas or to object/raise issues From January 2012, the teaching of literacy skills is assessed in every classroom under the new OfSTED framework.

This is a brilliant move by the Government. Based on the model of joint practice development, work in pairs or trios to develop multimedia resources to support non English specialists teaching great literacy. This is your 2 hour challenge... Your Best Practice Make this... Mulitmedia ... and specific Tangible... For you, your colleagues and the wider Teaching Leaders community to lead innovative literacy across all our schools and with all our students. And inclusive for all of our colleagues. So what can I focus on? All of our colleagues need to be literacy teachers.

They need to know what good literacy teaching looks and sounds like

They need to understand the strategies teachers can use to develop literacy

They need to be able to use tools to implement literacy and comprehension activities Your challenge...

...today, over the next two hours...

1. Is to develop the TL literacy handbook to help them become great literacy teachers

2. While discussing best practice in your area of expertise with your colleagues So what exactly do you want me to do? Extend your impact by designing and creating literacy resources that will add to the TL literacy handbook, that any of our 500+ participants and fellows can pick up and use, to develop their teams and improve the quality of school wide literacy teaching and learning Features of Great Literacy Reading Writing Speaking and Listening Higher Order Thinking Skills The Dialogic Classroom Assessment Accessing Text Manipulating Information Inference and extended reading Content and Comprehension Style Structure IT’S GOOD TO TALK
‘Reading and writing float on a sea of talk’
James Britton ‘ ‘Spoken language forms a constraint, a ceiling not only on the ability to comprehend but also on the ability to write beyond which literacy cannot progress’
Myhill and Fisher What is talk used for? Higher Order Thinking Skills

Creating
Evaluating
Analysing
Applying
Understanding
Remembering


Lower Order Thinking Skills
Anderson and Krathwohl
Bloom’s revised Taxonomy 2001 Pupils work best when they appreciate that there is a serious learning purpose for their talking.
Talk to engage: brainstorming; review of existing knowledge
Exploratory talk: small group collaboration
Talk to extend understanding: to explain and justify
Talk to express learning: presenting final outcomes
Talk to evaluate learning: plenary What does good speaking and listening look like?
Using talk to clarify and present ideas
(The dialogic classroom) Five principles, which bring together the essential features of dialogic teaching in the classroom:
Collective: teachers and children address learning tasks together, whether as a group or as a class, rather than in isolation;
Reciprocal: teachers and children listen to each other, share idea and consider alternative viewpoints;
Supportive: children articulate their ideas freely, without fear of embarrassment over ‘wrong’ answers; and they help each other to reach common understandings;
Cumulative: teachers and children build on their own and each others’ ideas and chain them into coherent lines of thinking and enquiry;
Purposeful: teachers plan and facilitate dialogic teaching with particular educational goals in view. Top tips Top Tips...
Plan for speaking and listening activities
State purpose for the activity
Make clear how the speaking and listening will be assessed
Model good speaking and listening.
Teach listening skills explicitly.
Teach note-taking to select and transform information and to aid memory.
Make clear individual responsibilities in group work
Allow thinking time
Manage the talk A sequence for teaching writing Establish clear aims and objectives
Provide exemplar models of written work
Explore the features of the text
Define the conventions
Model how it is written
Compose together
Scaffold the first attempts
Allow for independent writing
Allow pupils to redraft
Draw out the key learning
Reinforce the language patterns in talk activities Writing Non-Fiction Main categories of
non-fiction
Instructions
Recount
Explanation
Information
Persuasion
Discursive writing
Analysis
Evaluation All writing is context –specific, and structure will relate to purpose, though not necessarily to pre-set categories. Purpose is the most useful thing to bear in mind, together with audience.
BUT it is not always as simple as this…..
The art of teaching writing is to help students recognise the key purpose of each text and the features that best deliver it, not to slot it into a category. Conventions Purpose
What is its purpose?
Who is it for?
How will it be used?
What kind of writing is therefore appropriate?


Text Level
Layout
Structure /organisation
Sequence Sentence Level
Viewpoint ( first person, third etc.
Main tense
Active/passive voice
Typical sentence structure and length
Typical cohesion devices


Word Level
Stock words and phrases
Specialised vocabulary
Elaborate/plain vocabulary choices Challenge: Helping pupils structure their writing Writing is a tool for thought. As Vygotsky in 1986 said,
‘Thought undergoes many changes as it turns into speech. It does not merely find expression; it finds reality and form.’
Written and spoken language needs to be developed as a means of learning and not just seen as an outcome.
By explicitly supporting the writing process and teaching literacy skills teachers will enable pupils to become more confident users of language and ultimately more confident young people whose horizons will not be limited by the limits of their language. Helping pupils structure their writing: Content
Helping pupils improve their writing: Style Sorting activities

Writing Frames

Mind/concept mapping

Modelling the writing

Use of exemplar models

Use of a poor model
Connectives
Sentence structure
Word banks


Maximising the effect and impact on learning
Need to teach pupils what good means. How to get the most out of Sorting Activities
Top Tips There has to be a context for the activity
Students sort cards into group/ categories/themes
Irrelevant information is put to one side
Points within each group are prioritised and sequenced
Spare cards are made available to add more information or examples
Each category is prioritised and sequenced –order of importance
Links between groups are discussed
Each group/ category is given a title
Topic sentences are written for each category/group
Subject specific vocabulary / key phrases/connectives are available Writing frames Advantages
Gives pupils a structure and overview
Gives pupils the experience of generic structures of writing
Helps get them get started
Focuses their attention with short sections
Supports the thinking process –cohesive links
Enables pupils to consider what they have learnt
Enables pupils to succeed Disadvantages
Has a prescribed logic only known to author
Does not always allow for spontaneity and creativity
Pupils can become over- reliant on writing frames
Pupils can become unwilling to think for themselves
Writing frames can become repetitive
Writing frames can limit thought Connectives: strategies for their useful employment Classroom displays


Connective lists placed in books

Connective lists according to individual types of writing.

Connective cards
Connectives sorted by categories

Connectives sorted by categories and colour coded

Pupils decide appropriate connectives Connectives and phrases When comparing similarities
When contrasting
When signalling cause and effect
When introducing evidence and examples
When changing direction
When adding to a point
When signalling contradictions
When related to time (temporal)
When signalling emphasis
When trying to describe the effect of something
When being tentative
. . . and on and on and on Top tips for classroom practice When you set a writing task, alert pupils to the writing conventions. Provide examples
Write with them as a whole class activity, talking aloud about the style and expression, so they know what to do .
Brainstorm and display a list of suitable connectives for the topic.
Give pupils hints about improving their style and expression. Every week, analyse a well turned sentence from current work on WB and explain what you admire about it.
Encourage pupils to reflect on the way they express sophisticated ideas and arguments in talk and how they might transfer this to their writing .
Scaffold the writing, especially at first – eg by using writing frames, sentence starters and suggested connectives.
Encourage peer drafting and editing. In groups, pick one of these strands and develop it commoncraft are good at this... Onomatopoeia, Idiom, Antonym... So how do you teach vocabulary?
How would you teach these words? Isostasy, Proletarian, Entomology And what about these words?
Full transcript