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A Different History

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by

David Mugambi

on 23 November 2012

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Transcript of A Different History

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Images from Shutterstock.com A DIFFERENT HISTORY By. Sujata Bhatt Poem Biography Sujata Bhatt was born in Ahmedabad, India. She grew up in Pune, (India) and in the United States.
Sujata Bhatt's multicultural perspectives on language, culture, art and history surely originate in her own life experiences. Narrative Perspective, Language and Imagery Great Pan is not dead;
he simply emigrated
to India.
Here, the gods roam freely,
disguised as snakes or monkeys:
every tree is sacred
and it is sin
to be rude to a book.
It is a sin to shove a book aside
with your foot,
a sin to slam books down
hard on a table,
a sin to toss one carelessly
across a room.
You must learn how to turn the pages gently
without disturbing Sarasvati,
without offending the tree
from whose wood the paper was made

Which language
has not been the opressor's tongue?
Wich language
truly meant to murder someone ?
And how does it happen
that after the torture,
after the soul has bee cropped
with a long scythe swooping out
of the conqueror's face-
the unborn grandchildren
grow to love that strange language Summary Sujata Bhatt wrote this poem during the period of England's colonization.
It is linked in two parts: lines 1-18 and lines 19-29.
In the first part it shows us that although life in India is free (or should be), there is constant pressure to conform to other ways of life.
In the second part, the poet returns to the idea of a foreign language that was once the language of the invader (colonist), but despite this there always comes time that the younger generation will come to learn and even love the language! Great pan is not dead;
he simply emigrated
to India.
Here, the gods roam freely,
disguised as snakes or monkeys;
every tree is sacred
and it is sin
to be rude to a book. The Great Pan is the Ancient Greek god of nature, part-man, part-goat. Unusual word- it shows that India is a diaspora. The word 'here' emphsises
that it is seperated from
other countries. Because the gods roam freely and its regarded a sin to treat a book badly cause it you will offend Sarasvati or the tree itself. You must learn how to turn the pages gently
without disturbing Sarasvati,
without offending the tree
from whose wood the paper was made. Shows that he doesnt like disturbance One should respect Sarasvati
and be polite..and this is because
he is an artist of all the beauty and
nature. Which language
has not been the oppressor's tongue?
Which language
truly meant to murder someone?
And how does it happen
that after the torture,
after the soul has been cropped
with a long scythe swooping out
of the conqueror's face-
the unborn grandchildren
grow to love that strange language. There is no language without
boundaries. No harm intended Grim reeper
still out! With fear that souls will be cropped..
this same murderous language is still
loved at the very end. Conclusion It is written in Third Person and this is seen cause Sujata refers to the characters as 'He'.
It is written in free verse
Powerful begin- blunt ending.
No variation of stanzas.
The mood and atmosphere is very informative and direct to warn someone not to do something. Theme, Content and Structure
Full transcript