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I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

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Alicia Renteria

on 18 December 2014

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Transcript of I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud

Poem by William Wordsworth
Presented by Alicia Renteria

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
"I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud"
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
By: William Wordsworth

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed—and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

Wordsworth has created this poem to reveal how nature and humans share many qualities and are connected in unique ways. In order to express this concept the use of personification and imagery are shown throughout the poem. In the poem the character discovers daffodils, which represent nature as a whole. In line 15, the poem is revealed to being a memory in Wordsworth's perspective.

Lines 1-6
" I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze."
Lines 7-12
"Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance"
Lines 13-18
"The waves beside them dance: but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
I gazed-and gazed-but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought"
Lines 19-24
"For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood
They flash open that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils."
In the first stanza the speaker illustrates a memory of himself wandering across hills, "lonely as a cloud". By using the word "wandered" the speaker is assumed to feel purposeless and directionless, until finally he encounters a large crowd of daffodils, "fluttering and dancing in the breeze", stretching out in a vast area near a lake.
In the second stanza the speaker goes more into depth about the daffodils. As stated, they reminded him of the Milky Way because of all the flowers tightly packed together, similarly to how stars seem to look. In the previous stanza the daffodils were described with the words host and golden, and are now being compared to stars. Wordsworth seems to be comparing the beauty of the daffodils to heavenly beings, such as angels.
In the third stanza the speaker compares the waves of the lake to the waves of daffodils and even though the lake is "sparkling", the daffodils contain more "glee". Wordsworth also states that, "in such a jocund company" yet the character himself was unable to understand what he had gained from his experience with the daffodils after gazing at them.
In the fourth stanza the poet is now able to describe what he had gained from the experience. Afterward, while he was feeling pensive and lonely he was able to remember the daffodils and regain a sense of comfort and peace.
Full transcript