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Style Analysis

Created for use with senior AP literature classes, fall semester
by

Victoria Cogswell

on 5 October 2016

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Transcript of Style Analysis

The Eagle

He clasps the crag with crooked hands;
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ringed with the azure world, he stands.

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls;
He watches from his mountain walls,
And like a thunderbolt he falls.
Also, “style” is not so much WHAT the writer says,
but HOW he/she says it.

Analyzing style is easier
if you look at the “elements”, “tools” or
“building blocks” of style and discuss them.

Here are a few of those tools writers use:
Diction is word choice, language, vocabulary, and figurative language

For example, look for single words that "stand out"/ strike you as odd or moving. Also, look for strong connotations (hot words).
"Details" means descriptive language that conjures images
in the reader’s mind; more creative, less connotative or metaphorical than diction.

Think about those images that "jump out at you" or make you stop reading for a moment. Think of those as "golden lines" :)

When writing commentary/analysis consider:
Effect: How do these images strike the reader?, create atmosphere?, convey meaning?, etc.

Senses appealed to: Be aware of details that appeal to all five senses: mention if relevant.

Relate to your thesis: Make clear how this detail conveys the author’s attitude.
Body Paragraph Format
Eleven Sentence Requirement
Sentence #1 TS Topic Sentence

Sentence #2 CD First sent. of concrete detail
Fact quotation example
Sentence #3 CM one sentence commentary
about Sent. #2 (analysis, inference)
Sentence #4 CM another sent. commentary says

more about #3 (opinion, insight)
Sentence #5 CD Second sent. of concrete detail
Sentence #6 CM one sent commentary about #5
Sentence #7 CM another sent. commentary -#5

Sentence #8 CD Third sent. of concrete detail
Sentence #9 CM one sent commentary about #8
Sentence #10 CM another sent. commentary -#8


Sentence #11 CS concluding sentence
Like this?
thesun.co.uk
Types of Point of View:

i.First Person= familiar, personal, intimate. Reader responds with character, but is limited to what narrator knows “I” “we”

ii.Third person (limited)= achieves distance, less personal and intense. May seem objective and cold. Limited. “he” “she”

iii.Third person (omniscient)= understands all perspectives, broad picture, but less focused. People are less significant. “he” “she”

iv. Second Person= draws reader into piece, makes him part of it, may make the reader uncomfortable. “you”

(Relate to your thesis: How does P.O.V. help support your thesis/nail ? If it doesn’t, don’t write about it)
The way in which a story/poem is narrated. Who sees/tells the story and how is it related to the listener?

Some questions to ask when analyzing:
Is the narrator a part of the story? Outside the story? How limited is his/her view?
The way in which the poem is organized

Types of Organization:
Chronological: happens in time, in one day, in an hour, etc.
( Logical, shows progress and change and is comfortable.)

Spatial: Up and down, front to back, left to right, inside and outside and large to small.
( movement may reference theme and/or attitude.)

Flashback: tells the story backwards thru a flashback/memories. May start at beginning or middle.
(flashback builds suspense and wonder , and increases intensity.)

Stanzas & paragraphs: Why is the poem broken up that way? Are some larger than others? Look for outstanding features.
(Be insightful. Be clever… And always…

Relate to Thesis: show how the poem's organization enhances your thesis/nail (speaker’s attitude)
Syntax is sentence structure and phrasing

When discussing syntax you may have to describe
patterns and quote short examples.

Sentence types:
rhetorical ?’s, commands, parallel structure, short lines/sent juxtaposed with long, wordy ones.

Also look for
unusual punctuation, (…) CAPS, dash, italics exclamation—anything that stands out.

Some questions to ask:
What is the effect of the syntax used? Why did the author use it?

Relate to thesis: How does it reinforce attitude or thesis?
That's a great hat, but no. Not that
kind of style.

Today we're focusing on language.

We mean an author's style.
Note: There is often a limited amount to say about point of view when writing an analysis.
--Alfred Lord Tennyson
What was that paragraph structure again?
Body Paragraph Format
Eleven Sentence Requirement
Sentence #1 TS Topic Sentence

Sentence #2 CD First sent. of concrete detail
Fact quotation example
Sentence #3 CM one sentence commentary
about Sent. #2 (analysis, inference)
Sentence #4 CM another sent. commentary says

more about #3 (opinion, insight)
Sentence #5 CD Second sent. of concrete detail
Sentence #6 CM one sent commentary about #5
Sentence #7 CM another sent. commentary -#5

Sentence #8 CD Second sent. of concrete detail
Sentence #9 CM one sent commentary about #5
Sentence #10 CM another sent. commentary -#5


Sentence #11 CS concluding sentence
Let's try an analysis paragraph
discussing diction/detail--

Here's a great poem to use as your subject:
Now try a second analysis
paragraph on "The Eagle".

This time, analyze the style in
terms of point of view, organization,
and/or syntax.
Here are some other style "tools" an author uses:
In your commentary/analysis you should analyze the effect the words have.

Some questions to ask yourself:
How do the words strike the reader? What is the attitude underlying the words?
What are the connotations? (emotional coloring, extra implied meaning). Describe connotations as positive or negative. What do they suggest?

Relate diction to overall thesis: How do these connotations contribute to/support the author’s attitude/tone named in your thesis?
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