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A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

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by

Wendy Eckert

on 30 November 2015

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Transcript of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

What is a carol?
A religious folk song or popular hymn
What is a stave?
A verse or stanza of a poem
Standards:
•Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to the characters, setting, and plot
•Analyze how particular lines of dialogue or incidents in a story or drama propel the action, reveal aspects of a character, or provoke a decision.
•Dramatic irony to create effects such as suspense
•Interpret figures of speech (through the questions)
•Active and passive voice
•Verbs – indicative, imperative, interrogative, conditional, subjunctive mood

Assessment: Reading Comprehension, Annotation, Vocabulary, Literary Elements, Writing, Grammar
Potboiler: an inferior work written purely for quick profit. While the book was an instant success and remains one of his best known works, Dickens made little money because people bought pirated editions. Copyright laws did not exist at this time.

A Christmas Carol
was also the first story transmitted over radio.
Previous Connections -

History: Railroad, Cotton Gin, Steam Engine, Improved Transportation

Queen Victoria/Victorian Era: Reign 1837-1901, Oddities, Darwinism was the most important contribution to this era

Literature: The Hound of the Baskervilles, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Oliver Twist, William Blake "Chimney Sweeper"
Tonight's Assignment: Screencast - find a non-fiction article on Victoria Era, Industrial Revolution, or Charles Dickens
What literary techniques did Dickens use to construct this tale?
Theme, allusion, figurative language, irony, and symbolism
Annotate in your book; note evidence and examples of each

A Christmas Carol
by Charles Dickens
The Victorian city of London was a city of starling contrasts. New building and affluent development went hand in hand with horribly overcrowded slums where people lived in the worst conditions imaginable.

Part 2
Population
Sanitation
Living Conditions
Working Conditions/Child Labor Laws
Charles Dickens
Population:
In 1800 the population of London was 1 million.
In 1850 the population of London was 2.3 million.
By 1900 the population grew to over 6 million.

Problems with rapid population growth -
Lack of burial space (instances of body snatching, bodies left out to rot)
Considerable sanitation issues (churchyards full, sewer issues)
Combination of coal-fired stoves and poor sanitation made the air heavy and foul smelling
Sewage thrown in the Thames (Joseph Bazalgette)
Living conditions - slums; overcrowded
London could not take care of this many people - in respect to food, sanitation, jobs, housing
Work Conditions and Child Labor Laws:
Despite the economic expansion of the Industrial Revolution, living conditions among the poor were horrible.
Dickens worked 11 hours a day as a boy - for 6 shillings a week
Begging
Destitute
Fear of Debtor's Prison (work conditions)
Threat of poverty is always present (work house)
1870 - law passed making school compulsory for children 5-12

Hypocrisy:
a pretense of having a virtuous character, moral, or religious beliefs or principles, that one does not really have
Full transcript