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Native American Civil Rights Movement

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by

Zack Crenshaw

on 10 December 2012

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Transcript of Native American Civil Rights Movement

By Djavon Dupree
Zack Crenshaw
Evan Gorski Native American Civil Rights The takeover of Alcatraz Bibliography American Indian Movement Brought to Attention:
Civil Rights to the national government
Civil Rights to Public Indians of All Tribes Island was occupied from 1969 to 1971 One of the most successful protests - Get back Indian land
- Pan-Indian Identity
- Native Nations sovereignty
- Repeal damaging laws
-Gov. programs for Indian Relations
- Federal Protection
- Religious freedom
- Promise of health, housing, economic development and education for all Indian peoples.
-Stop offensive sports teams mascots/names
- Preserve Native Heritage Goals: Result: Improved education and healthcare for Native Americans Methods: Red-Power Movement Non-Violence
Protest
Changing Laws Violence
Occupations
Breaking Laws 1991: Supreme Court ruled that states don't have to show interest in laws that limit and interfere with religious freedom
1993 President Clinton signed and congress passed Religious Freedom Restoration Act
RFRA: Limits government ability to interfere with religious freedom
1994 President Clinton:
Signed law allowing the religious use of peyote
Prohibited discrimination against those who engage in the use of peyote for religious purposes
Protected Native Americans' use of peyote
1924
NCYI
Schools Modern Civil Rights (1990's) Elimination of offensive mascots
Reflect stereotypes
Perpetuate racism against Native Americans The Longest Walk Roughly 2000 people finished the walk on July 15th 1978 Five Months San Francisco to Washington DC Only two dozen started the walk Result Altered treaties between the US government
and various Native tribes Limited hunting and fishing rights Both Native Americans and Supporters Results: Successes: Separate Nations Job Opportunities
Job Training
Religious freedom
Federal Support
Heritage not destroyed
Pan-Indian Identity
Domestic Dependent Nations Domestic Dependent Nations Have no power in US gov
Congress has some control
Separate jurisdiction
Self ruled (own government)
Abide by state criminal laws Failures Offensive team names/mascots still exist
Few indian members of Congress
Domestic Dependent Nations
Poor Economy Alcatraz is Not an Island. Last modified 2002. Accessed December 7, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/b5wwl.

Alcatraz Occupation in 1969. Accessed December 7, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/buqcsc6.

American Indian Movement. Illustration. Redhawk’s Lodge. Accessed December 9, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/alxu42q.

“American Indian Movement.” Indians.org. Accessed December 9, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/bcnqf33.

Freedman, Joe. “Indians End Longest Walk in Washington DC on July 15, 1978.” JoFreedman.com. Accessed December 9, 2012. http://www.jofreeman.com/photos/Longest_Walk.htm.

The Leadership Conference. “Native Americans.” Civilrights.org. Accessed December 9, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/7rl9t45.

Native American occupation of Alcatraz. Accessed December 7, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/ablp4f7.

Pan-Indianism. Accessed December 9, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/c4ex5ce.

Public Law 280 and Concurrent Tribal Authority, (Cal. ). Accessed December 9, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/bk29zs5.

“Red Power.” Accessed December 7, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/an6kkt.

Wittstock, Laura Watterman, and Elaine J. Salinas. A Brief History of AIM. Accessed December 9, 2012. http://tinyurl.com/6n9lmot.
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