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Copy of Crime and Punishment; New Formalism Literary Criticism

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Jeffrey Serna

on 3 April 2013

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Transcript of Copy of Crime and Punishment; New Formalism Literary Criticism

• an introspective third person point of view cool zooming in hi hi Application within Crime and Punishment Imargery of St. Petersburg

Lots of filth and poverty depicted, Dostoevsky's way of portraying the awful economic condition of Russia at the time he wrote the novel.
Also symbolically related to Raskolnikov's own inner turmoil, the dissaray of the city only fuels his own detereoration.
"Towards morning it will flood all the lower places, the streets, it will pour into the basements and the cellars, the cellar rats will float up, and amid rain and wind people, cursing and drenched, will begin transferring their stuff to the upper floors…” (Pg. 507-508) Description of the awful conditions which people must endure. Imagery of Blood & Gore
Very detailed imagery of the blood when Raskolnikov attacks Alyonya shows Raskolnikov’s initiation into evil, and the irreversibility of his deed.
Then he struck her again and yet again with all his strength, both times with the blunt-end, both times on the crown of the head. Blood poured out as from an overturned glass, and the body fell backwards.” (Pg. 77) Raskolnikov killing Alyonya.
The blow landed directly on the skull, with the sharp edge, and immediately split the whole upper part of the forehead, almost to the crown.” (Pg. 79) Raskolnikov killing Lizaveta, Alyonya’s sister. Imagery of Dreams

Vicious whipping and cruel treatment of the meek horse in Raskolnikov’s first dream of the novel signifies the helplessness that Rask. Feels in his current situation.
"Her hind legs give way, but then she jumps up and pulls, pulls with all the strength she has left, pulls this way and that, trying to move the cart; but six whips come at her from all sides, and the shaft is raised again and falls for a third time, then a fourth, in heavy, rhythmic strokes" (Pg. 58). Horse’s desperation to survive, and the miserable treatment she receives. "'Cross yourself, pray once at least,’ Sonya asked in a trembling, timid voice" (Dostoevsky 523). Dostoevsky is able to illustrate the influences in Raskolnikov’s life, specifically the ambitious state of mind of Sonya, by representing her emotions through the cross. Crime and Punishment New Formalist Literary Criticism Is anyone really above the law? What makes one person more important than the other? Style New Formalist Literary Criticism Style Structure Benefit Technique Formalism Began in Russia in the 1920s Literature began to be observed and analyzed
Allows literature to be viewed through a scientific lens Permits the reader to analyze literature with complete objectivity Analyze Interpret Evaluate Features of a text to find its structural purpose. Water- Water can be viewed as a symbol of rebirth and regeneration (Gibian 529). Positive characters view it as a life giving force in the world. In contrast, negative characters view water as a symbol of death. "The water’s rising, he thought. Towards morning it will flood all the lower places, the streets; it will pour into the basements and cellars, the cellar rats will float up, and amid rain and wind people, cursing and drenched, will begin trasferring their stuff to the upper floors" (Dostoevsky 507). Water, instead of being an instrument of life, now becomes for Svidrigailov an insufferable, avenging menace during the last hours of his life.  Svidrigailov has vivid nightmares that illustrate his sense of despair in life. Dostoevsky conveys Svidrigailov’s contemplation of suicide through the symbol of water, which represents menacing and daunting thoughts. cool zooming in hi The relatively sustained use of symbols to represent or suggest other things or ideas. (Murfin 506). Symbols Something that stands for a large and more complex idea.  “Symbols have been of particular interest to formalist, who study how meaning emerges from the complex, patterned relationships among images in a work. (Murfin 505)” “Traditional symbolism, that is, symbolism which draws on images established by the Christian tradition and on those common in Russian non-Christian, possibly pre-Christian and pagan, folk thought and expression, is an important element in the structure of Crime and Punishment. (Gibian 529)” Symbolism Application Within Crime and Punishment Napoleon Is anyone really above the law? What makes one person more important than the other? The allusion to Napoleon introduces the fact that some people may be above the law. If an individual is capable of successfully progressing society, then they could possibly be superior. "'He got terribly carried away with Napoleon-that is, essentially what carried him away was that a great many men of genius disregarded isolated evil and stepped over it without hesitation’" (491). Napoleon made many morally and ethically wrong decisions. However, his actions led to the advancement of society under his rule. Raskolnikov believes that he as well will progress society by murdering the pawnbroker and redistributing her wealth, which in turn is his justification for committing the murders. Lazarus "Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live: and whosoever liveth and belieth in me shall never die" (Dostoevsky 327). Dostoevsky uses a cross to portray the deep spiritual values of Sonya, as well as hope and salvation present in the world. "Sonya silently took two crosses from a drawer, one of cypress, the other of brass; she crossed herself, crossed him, and hung the cypress cross around his neck" (Dostoevsky 522). "'Cross yourself, pray once at least,’ Sonya asked in a trembling, timid voice" (Dostoevsky 523). Dostoevsky is able to illustrate the influences in Raskolnikov’s life, specifically the ambitious state of mind of Sonya, by representing her emotions through the cross. The Cross The Biblical allusion to Lazarus demonstrates how Dostoevsky conveys Raskalnikov’s sense of suffering, along with his metaphoric rebirth. Raskolnikov relates to Lazarus because Jesus raised Lazarus from the dead. Raskolnikov is psychologically deceased, and he discovers redemption when the devoutly religious Sony enters his life. Imagery Imagery of Blood & Gore

Very detailed imagery of the blood when Raskolnikov attacks Alyonya shows Raskolnikov’s initiation into evil, and the irreversibility of his deed.
"Then he struck her again and yet again with all his strength, both times with the blunt-end, both times on the crown of the head. Blood poured out as from an overturned glass, and the body fell backwards" (Pg. 77). Raskolnikov killing Alyonya.
"The blow landed directly on the skull, with the sharp edge, and immediately split the whole upper part of the forehead, almost to the crown” (Pg. 79). Raskolnikov killing Lizaveta, Alyonya’s sister. Style inner dialogue and monologue fused together The inner dialogue and monologue fusion is mainly incorporated with Raskolnikov. Dostoevsky show his fusion of inner dialogue and monologue by exposing directly to the readers Raskolnikov talking to himself (literally) and showing Raskolnikov talking to other people who are not actually present Perspective/Point of View Dostoevsky show his fusion of inner dialogue and monologue by exposing directly to the readers Raskolnikov talking to himself (literally) and showing Raskolnikov talking to other people who are not actually present Works Cited

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Dostoevsky, Fyodor. Crime and Punishment. New York: Vintage, 1992. Print.

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Gibian, George. “Crime and Punishment.” Wordbook Online. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2012. <http://www.worldbookonline.com/wb/Login?ed=wb&tu=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.worldbookonline.com%2Fadvanced%2Farticle%3Fid%3Dar164660%26st%3Dcrime%2Band%2Bpunishment>.

Gibian, Grorge. Crime and Punishment: The Coulson Translation Backgrounds and Sources Essays in Criticism. New York: W. W. Norton &Company, 1989. Print.

Murfin, Ross, and Supryia M. Ray. The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. Print.

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Teuber, Andreas. “Fyodor Mikhaylovich Dostoevsky.” Brandies. Literature Resource Center, n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2012. <http://people.brandeis.edu/~teuber/dostoevskybio.html#_crimeandpunishment>.

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Water and It’s Structure. N.p., n.d. Web. 5 Feb. 2012. <http://www.chem1.com/acad/sci/aboutwater.html>. • Point of view is an introspective third person that includes a narrator, which includes inner dialogue and monologue fused together Core to the structure is Raskolnikov. Structure six parts with an epilogue divided into two small sections. Planned and executed in Part I
Remaining five parts gradually unfolds his emotions and suppressed guilt. Slowly depicting physical and psychological changes in Raskolnikov “’Because the thing is obvious’ he muttered to himself, grinning and maliciously triumphant before hand over the success of his decision. ‘No, mama, no, Dunya, you won’t deceive me!... And they will still apologize for not asking my advice and deciding the matter without me! Well they might! They think it’s impossible to break it off now; but we’ll see whether it’s impossible or not! And what a capital excuse” ‘Pyotr Petrovich is such a busy man, such as busy man that he can’t even get married any other way than post haste, almost right on the train’. No Dunechka, I see it all and know what this so much is that you want to talk to me about;”(Dostoevsky 40) Dostoevsky has made Raskolnikov's character to be very ambiguous Raskolnikov's personality seem to change in varying parts. Raskonikov often contradicts himself Small elements of Nihilism is found in character ideals His contradictions creates a core in which the plot could develop Tone A dark tone Dark Humor , Violence, Suspense, recurring needs to sacrifice oneself, recurring needs of redemption, hardship, a feeling for change, optimism I I I IV V VI Central to the entire plot are the dual murders committed by Raskolnikov Core to the structure is Raskolnikov.
Plot unfolds based on his life and actions Despite the change in personality, the introspective narration stays true and consistent. The tone of the introspective narration overall seems to be neutral. Some might find hints of a meek, dark setting, a suspenseful feeling
The tone changes depending on Raskolnikov because the reader is essentially living in his mind
Despite these random changes of emotion, the narration stays netural and does not bind to any true bias.
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