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Oil

Oil and stuffs
by

Lane Kennedy

on 19 February 2013

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Transcript of Oil

History of oil How the use effects affects the lithosphere Oil By: Lane, Kaylee, and Kaitlyn Oil or: Crude oil is a naturally occurring flammable liquid. It is made up from hydrocarbons and other organic materials. Because it is made of organic materials it is highly flammable.

It is used to fuel machinery and to lubricate moving parts. What is oil and how it is used? Issues related to use How could the use of oil be changed to reduce the effect on the lithosphere Future of Oil Burning oil emits carbon dioxide similar to burning gasoline. When the carbon dioxide mixes with water it creates an acid that is dangerous to plant life. This can also create holes in the ozone layer. It can also get on animals and kill them. Works Cited 1910, significant oil fields had been discovered in Canada (specifically, and in the province of Alberta. "History of petroleum - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia." Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_petroleum>. Oil effects the lithosphere by creating more erosion. Oil damages the vegetation and with out the roots of the vegetation the soil is looser and it easier for water to pick it up and move it. More than four thousand years ago there were oil pits near Ardericca (near Babylon), and a pitch spring on Zacynthus ( Ionian islands, Greece ). The earliest known oil wells were drilled in China in 347 AD or earlier. They had depths of up to about 800 feet and were drilled using bits attached to bamboo poles. The modern history of petroleum began in the 19th century with the refining of kerosene from crude oil. The process of refining kerosene from coal was discovered by Nova Scotian and Abraham Pineo Gesner in 1846. Until the mid-1950s coal was still the world's foremost fuel, but after this time oil quickly took over. Later, following the 1973 and 1979 energy crises. This brought to light the concern that oil is a limited resource that will eventually run out, at least as an economically viable energy source. People could purchase more fuel efficient cars
Dispose of oil in a safe manner or filter and reuse oil. "Otter at Seattle Aquarium Knows All about Health Effects of Oil Spill." KOMO News. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013. Future of Oil "Focus: The future of oil and gas | The Economist." The Economist - World News, Politics, Economics, Business & Finance. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Feb. 2013. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/11/focus-1>. Eats oil like its going out of style OVER the next 25 years oil demand will increase from 88m barrels a day to 99m, mainly to fill Asian petrol tanks, if planned energy policies around the world continues much as they are today. Over nine-tenths of the additional oil will come from the Middle East and North Africa, according to the International Energy Agency's latest edition of the World Energy Outlook. The organization reckons that the region will require $2.7 trillion of investment in exploration and production to provide the oil. Even in the Middle East, where oil is relatively easy to extract, it will be harder to get out of the ground. Average extractions costs there will increase from just over $12 a barrel in 2011 to more than $15 in 2035, as production increases by more than 17m b/d. Costs will go up far more elsewhere as high prices encourage oil producers to go after oil that is trickier to come by. The greatest leap will come in Latin America as pricey deepwater oil grows in importance. DONT KILL THE OTTERS :( OVER the next 25 years oil demand will increase from 88m barrels a day to 99m, mainly to fill Asian petrol tanks, if planned energy policies around the world continues much as they are today. Over nine-tenths of the additional oil will come from the Middle East and North Africa, according to the International Energy Agency's latest edition of the World Energy Outlook. The organization reckons that the region will require $2.7 trillion of investment in exploration and production to provide the oil. Even in the Middle East, where oil is relatively easy to extract, it will be harder to get out of the ground. Average extractions costs there will increase from just over $12 a barrel in 2011 to more than $15 in 2035, as production increases by more than 17m b/d. Costs will go up far more elsewhere as high prices encourage oil producers to go after oil that is trickier to come by. The greatest leap will come in Latin America as pricey deepwater oil grows in importance.
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