Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Managing Mental Health in the Workplace for Managers- FULL DAY

No description
by

Sabrina Robinson

on 17 October 2018

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Managing Mental Health in the Workplace for Managers- FULL DAY

MANAGING MENTAL HEALTH IN THE WORKPLACE FOR MANAGERS
THANK YOU
WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS
TRAINING AGENDA
INTRODUCTIONS
Name
Job title and a bit about what you do.

RULES OF SAFETY
Confidentiality
Respect
Participation
No Disturbances
Challenge the Idea, Not the Person
All Questions Are Valid

Are there any other ground rules you would like to agree on?

TRAINING OVERVIEW
To assist staff with limited mental health experience to enhance their understanding of common mental health diagnoses and suggestions for best practice when working with service users.


TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE
TRAINING OVERVIEW
This course will provide an overview of a range of mental health issues including their prevalence, signs and symptoms, causes and how they can affect people. Exploring issues around improving the mental health and wellbeing of staff, how as an organisation you can go about reducing staff turnover and sickness absence and how to effectively support a member of staff who is dealing with a mental health issue. The session will cover relevant legislation in regards to making appropriate adjustments for people with mental health conditions in the workplace. Helping managers to consider how they can promote a healthy working environment which champions inclusion and challenges stereotypes, myths and stigma of mental health issues.


DEPRESSION
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
ANXIETY
What is Anxiety?
 
Anxiety, worry and fear are feelings that everyone experiences now and again. They prepare the body to take action to protect itself (the so-called 'fight or flight' response). But it can become a mental health problem if the response is exaggerated, lasts more than three weeks and interferes with daily life.

WHAT IS GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER (GAD)?
POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER
SCHIZOPHRENIA IS NOT...
 Split or multiple personality
 Untreatable
 A guarantee that a person will be violent
 A guarantee that a person will be in hospital for life

ACTIVITY: HEARING VOICES
COMMON MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF DEPRESSION
 Stressful life events
 Illness
 Personality (i.e. low self-esteem)
 Family history
 Giving birth
 Loneliness
 Alcohol and drugs

TALKING ABOUT DEPRESSION
People with GAD feel anxious most days and often struggle to remember the last time they felt relaxed. GAD can cause both psychological (mental) and physical symptoms. These vary from person to person, but can include feeling restless or worried and having trouble concentrating or sleeping.
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF ANXIETY
 Past or childhood experiences
 Everyday life and habits (stress, working long hours, money problems)
 Diet (drinking lots of caffeine, poor diet)
 Physical and mental health
 Drugs and medication (psychiatric medication, medication for other health problems, recreational drugs or alcohol)

RELATED CONDITIONS
Anxiety is the main symptom of several conditions, including panic disorder, phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder and social anxiety disorder (social phobia).


PSYCHOSIS
WHAT IS PSYCHOSIS?
Psychosis is when an individual perceives or interprets events differently from people around them. This could include experiencing hallucinations, delusions or flight of ideas.
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

hallucinations
– where a person hears, sees and, in some cases, feels, smells or tastes things that aren't there; a common hallucination is hearing voices


delusions
– where a person believes things that, when examined rationally, are obviously untrue
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF PSYCHOSIS
It's sometimes possible to identify the cause of psychosis as a specific mental health condition, such as:


schizophrenia
– a condition that causes a range of psychological symptoms, including hallucinations and delusions

bipolar disorder
– a mental health condition that affects mood; a person with bipolar disorder can have episodes of depression (lows) and mania (highs)

severe depression
– some people with depression also have symptoms of psychosis when they're very depressed

SCHIZOPHRENIA
WHAT IS SCHIZOPHRENIA?
Doctors often describe schizophrenia as a psychotic illness. This means sometimes a person may not be able to distinguish their own thoughts and ideas from reality.
SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
• a lack of interest in things
• feeling disconnected from your feelings
• difficulty concentrating
• wanting to avoid people
• hallucinations
• hearing voices
• delusions
• feeling like you need to be protected.
• changes in behaviour

POSSIBLE CAUSES

 Dopamine
 Stressful life events
 Brain development
 Pregnancy and birth complications
 Drug abuse
 Inheritance

PERSONALITY DISORDER
WHAT IS PERSONALITY DISORDER?
Personality disorders are conditions in which an individual differs significantly from an average person, in terms of how they think, perceive, feel or relate to others.

Changes in how a person feels and distorted beliefs about other people can lead to odd behaviour, which can be distressing to the person and may upset others.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
 being overwhelmed by negative feelings such as distress, anxiety, worthlessness or anger

 avoiding other people and feeling empty and emotionally disconnected

 difficulty managing negative feelings without self-harming or, in rare cases, threatening other people

 odd behaviour

 difficulty maintaining stable and close relationships, especially with partners, children and professional carers

 sometimes, periods of losing contact with reality

POSSIBLE CAUSES OF PERSONALITY DISORDERS
 Family circumstances
 Trauma
 Genetics and inheritance

PTSD can develop after a traumatic event.


There is no doubt that the reactions that may follow can seriously hamper and interfere with your life.
SPECIFIC FORMS OF DEPRESSION
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)
Postnatal depression
Bipolar disorder

OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER
(OCD) has two main parts: obsessions and compulsions.

Obsessions are unwelcome thoughts, ideas or urges that repeatedly appear in your mind.

Compulsions are repetitive activities that you feel you have to do.
OCD CYCLE
POSSIBLE CAUSES OF OCD
beliefs
Personal experience
Biological Factors
mental health in the workplace
WHY DO WE NEED TO THINK ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH?
DEFINITION OF MENTAL HEALTH
Mental health is not just the absence of mental disorder. It is defined as a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community.

World Health Organization
MENTAL HEALTH STIGMA
WHAT IS STIGMA?
MENTAL HEALTH IN THE MEDIA
mental health stigma in the workplace
WHAT HAS AN IMPACT ON OUR MENTAL HEALTH?
Contributing Factors to Mental Health and Wellbeing
DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMET OF COMMON MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS
DIAGNOSIS
To diagnose a mental health condition, doctors look for groupings of certain symptoms.

For more common mental health problems, particularly depression and anxiety, a doctor, usually your GP, will normally give you a short questionnaire about your symptoms to help with this.

Less common mental health problems may mean you need to be referred to a specialist before you can be given a diagnosis.
International Classification of Diseases (ICD) system


TREATMENT
 Self-Help
 Talking Treatments
 Medication
 Complementary and Alternative Therapies
 Arts Therapies

ACTIVITY: DIRECTORY OF SUPPORT
SELF-HELP: 5 WAYS TO WELLBEING
Connect
Be active
Keep Learning
Give
Take notice


VOLUNTARY SECTOR
Local & National Charities:
Mind
Rethink
Guideposts Trust
Samaritans

….and many more, consider the organisations we discussed previously.

GP AND SPA
GP

Single Point of Access:
The service is initially for routine or urgent referral for GPs and new services users. Fully trained staff, including clinicians, will be able to provide advice and guidance and also signpost to other organisations where necessary.

Call Single Point of Access (SPA) Tel: 0300 777 0707 from 8am - 7pm Email: hpft.spa@nhs.net
THE WELLBEING TEAM
COMMUNITY SERVICES
 Adult Community Mental Health Services
 Community Eating Disorders Service (CEDS)
 Community Perinatal Team
 Wellbeing Service



HERTFORDSHIRE DRUG AND ALCOHOL SERVICES
CAMHS
Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services: CAMHS is comprised of professionals who provide advice, assessment and treatment on emotional, behavioural and / or mental health problems that require specialist support. 
ACUTE AND REHABILITATION SERVICES
 Inpatient Accommodation
 Crisis Assessment and Treatment Team
 A&E Liaison
 Acute Mental Health Inpatient Services
 Community In-Patient Assessment and Treatment Services
 Host Families Scheme

OUT OF HOURS MENTAL HEALTH HELPLINE
For out-of-hours advice and telephone support from a mental health professional call the Helpline on 01438 843322

This service operates through the night from 5pm until 9am on weekdays, and around the clock at weekends and on Bank Holidays.



LOCAL HELP AND SUPPORT
YOUR ROLE AS A MANAGER AND HAVING A CONVERSATION
FEARS AND CONCERNS
 Doing the wrong thing
 Not knowing what to do
 Wanting to do the right thing
 Fear of causing harm and distress

What fears and concerns do you have?
CASES WE KNOW
 How might this person be feeling?
 What would you say?
 What support could this individual seek/be signposted to?

LOOKING AFTER YOURSELF
 Pay attention to your own needs
 Share the responsibility with your team
 Find people to whom you can express your feelings

CONTRIBUTING FACTORS TO MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING
STARTING A CONVERSATION
HOW WOULD YOU GO ABOUT STARTING A CONVERSATION ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH?
 Introductions
 Rules of Safety
 Training Overview
 Quiz: Test Your Knowledge
 Managing Mental Health in the Workplace: Why is it important?
 What is Mental Health?
 Mental Health Stigma
 What has an impact on our mental health?
 Common Mental Health Conditions
 Common Symptoms, Feelings and Behaviours
 Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Mental Health Conditions
 Spotting the Signs in the Workplace
 Local Help and Support
 Creating a Mentally Healthy Workplace
 Your Role as a Manager and Having a Conversation about Mental Health
 Managers Mental Health
 Creating Positive Change in Your Organisation
 Evaluation and Close


mind map
PANICK ATTACKS
These are bouts of intense, often very frightening symptoms, usually lasting between 5 and 20 minutes. Someone experiencing a panic attack, may find it hard to breathe, and feel their heart beating hard. They may have a choking sensation, chest pain, begin to tremble or feel faint. It’s easy to mistake these for the signs of a heart attack or another serious medical problem. Panic attacks can occur at any time, and this is what makes them different from a natural response to real danger.
SELF-HARM
Self-harm is a way of expressing very deep distress where an individual takes actions to cause themselves physical pain. They may not know they self-harm, but it can be a means of communicating what they can’t put into words or think clearly about. After self-harming, they may feel better able to cope with life again, for a while, but the cause of their distress is unlikely to have gone away.
SUICIDAL FEELINGS
Many people experience suicidal feelings as part of a mental health problem. Suicidal thoughts can be unpleasant, intrusive and scary. However, thinking about suicide does not necessarily mean that an individual actually intends to take their own life. Lots of people think about suicide, and the majority do not go on to kill themselves.
MENTAL HEALTH AND ASSOCIATED BEHAVIOURS AND FEELINSG
LEARNING OUTCOMES
The perception that a certain attribute makes a person unacceptably different from others, leading to prejudice and discrimination against them.
mental health stigma in the workplace
EXAMPLE
SEE THE PERSON FIRST,
NOT THE DIAGNOSIS
DEFINITION OF DEPRESSION
Depression is a common mental disorder, characterized by sadness, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt or low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite, feelings of tiredness, and poor concentration.

Depression can be long-lasting or recurrent, substantially impairing an individual’s ability to function at work or school or cope with daily life. At its most severe, depression can lead to suicide. When mild, people can be treated without medicines but when depression is moderate or severe they may need medication and professional talking treatments.

World Health Organization (WHO), 2015

INDIVIDUALS HAVE UNIQUE WAYS OF SEEING THE WORLD....
DEPRESSION CONTINUUM
TYPES OF DEPRESSION
TYPES OF DEPRESSION
MILD TO MODERATE DEPRESSION

Clinical or Major Depression:
Clinical depression is the more severe form of depression, also known as major depression or major depressive disorder. It isn't the same as depression caused by a loss, or a medical condition.
Postnatal depression

Bipolar disorder:
It's where there are spells of depression and excessively high mood (mania). The depression symptoms are similar to clinical depression, but the bouts of mania can include harmful behaviour.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)

TYPES OF DEPRESSION
Postnatal depression

Bipolar disorder:
It's where there are spells of depression and excessively high mood (mania). The depression symptoms are similar to clinical depression, but the bouts of mania can include harmful behaviour.

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD)

SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION
ACTIONS & WORDS
MY FEELINGS
 I am low-spirited for much of the time, every day
 I feel restless and agitated
 I get tearful easily
 I feel numb, empty and full of despair
 I feel isolated and unable to relate to other people
 I am unusually irritable or impatient
 I find no pleasure in life or things I usually enjoy
 I feel helpless
 I have lost interest in sex
 I am experiencing a sense of unreality

MY BEHAVIOUR
 I’m not doing activities I usually enjoy
 I am avoiding social events I usually enjoy
 I have cut myself off from others and can’t ask for help
 I am self-harming
 I find it difficult to speak

MY THOUGHTS
 I am having difficulty remembering things
 I find it hard to concentrate or make decisions
 I blame myself a lot and feel guilty about things
 I have no self-confidence or self-esteem
 I am having a lot of negative thoughts
 The future seems bleak
 What’s the point?
 I have been thinking about suicide

MY PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS
 I have difficulty sleeping
 I am sleeping much more than usual
 I feel tired and have no energy
 I have lost my appetite, and am losing weight
 I am eating a lot more than usual and putting on weight
 I have physical aches and pains with no obvious physical cause
 I am moving very slowly
 I am using more tobacco, alcohol or other drugs than usual

POSSIBLE CAUSES OF DEPRESSION
Chemical imbalance
Life events
Loss
Anger
Childhood experiences
Physical conditions
Illness
Personality
Genetics/Family history
Giving birth
Loneliness
Alcohol and drugs
A person with a cluster A personality disorder tends to have difficulty relating to others and usually shows patterns of behaviour most people would regard as odd and eccentric. Others may describe them as living in a fantasy world of their own.

An example is paranoid personality disorder, where the person is extremely distrustful and suspicious.

CLUSTER A PERSONALITY DISORDERS
A person with a cluster B personality disorder struggles to regulate their feelings and often swings between positive and negative views of others. This can lead to patterns of behaviour others describe as dramatic, unpredictable and disturbing.

An example is borderline personality disorder, where the person is emotionally unstable, has impulses to self-harm, and has intense and unstable relationships with others.

CLUSTER B PERSONALITY DISORDERS
A person with a cluster C personality disorder struggles with persistent and overwhelming feelings of fear and anxiety. They may show patterns of behaviour most people would regard as antisocial and withdrawn.

An example is avoidant personality disorder, where the person appears painfully shy, socially inhibited, feels inadequate and is extremely sensitive to rejection. The person may want to be close to others, but lacks confidence to form a close relationship.

CLUSTER C PERSONALITY DISORDERS
The Wellbeing Service is an Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Service, part of Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust. They deliver psychological therapies to those over the age of 16 years, registered with a GP in Hertfordshire.


Many of the options that they offer are based on Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) which is an evidence based psychological therapy.

They will help you to make and sustain the changes you need to make to reduce and, ultimately, stop your drug and/or alcohol use. We aim to empower you to identify and realise your goals throughout your recovery journey, in order to live a healthier, safer life.


HAVING A CONVERSATION


MIGHT BE DIFFICULT
DON'T AVOID IT
EARLY INTERVENTION
HERTFORDSHIRE MIND NEWORK
Our mission is to:

“Create opportunities for individual’s to make choices, find their own solutions, build resilience and manage their whole life and wellbeing"

This mission is delivered for clients through the following values:
 Hope
 Empathy
 Respect
 Integrity
 Excellence

 Have an increased knowledge and broad understanding of a range of mental health issues and the impact that they can have on individuals and understand some of the most common signs and symptoms of mental health conditions.
 Identify ways in which they can help to support their own and others mental health and wellbeing within the working environment and understand the benefits of work and supporting people back into work.
 Understand the impact that mental health issues can have on individuals within their team and the wider organisation.
 Understand an employer’s duty to make reasonable adjustments for people with mental health conditions in order to ensure they have the same access to everything that involves gaining or keeping employment as someone without a mental health condition.
 Recognise that everyone in the workplace has a role in promoting a healthy working environment.

MENTAL HEALTH IN THE WORKPLACE...



THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM
MENTAL HEALTH IN THE WORKPLACE: THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM
Stress, depression and anxiety are some of the most common health problems affecting the UK workforce.

There has been an increasing interest in mental health particularly over the last few months. Yet there is still much to be done in the workplace to address the stigma surrounding mental health, break down barriers and ensure employees can talk openly and get the support the need.

There is a lot organisations can gain from prioritising their employees’ mental health and wellbeing.

LET'S START THE CONVERSATION!
MENTAL WELLBEING & WORK: THE EVIDENCE
70 million working days are lost each year due to mental ill health, costing Britain annually £70-100bn. Presenteeism can double the cost.

77% of employees have experienced symptoms of poor mental health at some point in their lives.

62% of employees attributed their symptoms of poor mental health to work or said that work was a contributing factor.

Only 11% of employees discussed a recent mental health problem with their line manager.

Women in full-time employment are nearly twice as likely to have a common mental health problem as full-time employed men (19.8% vs 10.9%).

SO GIVE UP WORK YOU SAY?!?
THE BENEFITS OF WORK FOR MENTAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING
Being in work is generally beneficial to people’s physical and mental health and well-being (Waddell & Burton, 2006).

People in work tend to enjoy happier and healthier lives than those who are not in work (Fit for Work, 2015).

Work can have a positive impact on an individual’s wellbeing and their health behaviours, particularly when individuals have a positive work-life balance (Robinson & Kinman, 2009).

In the workplace stigma is where an employee is perceived as being different because of their mental health problem.

67% of employees feel scared, embarrassed or unable to talk about mental health concerns with their employer .

A survey from Friends Life found that 40% of 2,000 respondents from a cross-section of industries had experienced these kinds of mental health problems and had not told their employer.

SPOTTING THE SIGNS IN THE WORKPLACE
Emotional

Employees who are struggling with their mental health may seem irritable, sensitive to criticism, demonstrate an uncharacteristic loss of confidence or seem to lose their sense of humour.

Cognitive

An employee may make more mistakes than usual, have problems making decisions, or not be able to concentrate. Look out for any sudden and unexplained drop in performance at work.

Behavioural

This could include things like arriving late, not taking lunch breaks, taking unofficial time off, not joining in office banter, or not hitting deadlines, becoming more introvert or extroverted, generally acting out of character.

Physical

Employees who are stressed sometimes exhibit physical symptoms such as a constant cold, being tired at work, looking like they haven’t made an effort with their appearance, or rapid weight loss or gain.

Business

At a business level, look out for increased absence or staff turnover. Have you noticed employees working longer hours or a general drop in motivation or productivity levels?

WHAT IS A MENTALLY HEALTHY WORKPLACE?
CREATING A MENTALLY HEALTHY WORKPLACE
60 per cent of employees say they’d feel more motivated and more likely to recommend their organisation as a good place to work if their employer took action to support mental wellbeing.
Economic benefits

Lower risks of litigation – because they comply with legal duties
Improved return on investment in training and development
Improved customer care and relationships with clients
Reduced costs of sick pay, sickness cover, overtime and recruitment

Benefits for individuals

 People feel more motivated and committed to their work
 Morale is high
 People work harder and perform better
 People feel that they are part of a team and the decision-making process, so accept change better
 Relationships – with managers and within teams – are better
 People are happy in their work and don’t want to leave
 Line managers can outwardly show their duty of care
 Line Managers can demonstrate good management skills that could help their career development.


Management benefits

Reduced staff turnover and intention to leave, so improving retention
Better absence management
Fewer days lost to sickness and absenteeism
Fewer accidents
Improved work quality
Improved organisational image and reputation
Better staff understanding and tolerance of others experiencing problems


KEY LEGISLATION
Employers have a duty of care to their employees, which means that they should take all steps which are reasonably possible to ensure their health, safety and wellbeing.

Under the Equality Act (2010) if a team member's mental ill health amounts to a disability, an organisation must consider making 'reasonable adjustments' to help them carry out their job without being at a disadvantage.

REASONABLE ADJUSTMENTS
Any adjustment should only be made following discussion and agreement between the manager and team member on what might be helpful and what is possible. The team member will often know what support or changes they need.

Once an adjustment has been agreed, a manager should document this. Any change should be regularly monitored and reviewed to check that it is providing the support required.

THE ROLE OF A MANAGER
A manager should:
• be approachable, available and encourage staff to talk to them if they are having problems
• tailor their management style to suit the needs of each staff member
• monitor staff workloads, set realistic targets and be clear about priorities
• have regular one-to-ones and catch-ups to check on how work is going, identify upcoming challenges and what support may be required.

SPOT THE SIGNS OF MENTAL ILL HEALTH
A manager should never make assumptions, but signs of mental ill health can include:

 changes in usual behaviour, mood or how they interact with colleagues
 changes in the standard of their work or focus on tasks
 appearing tired, anxious or withdrawn and reduced interest in tasks they previously enjoyed
 changes in appetite and/or increase in smoking and drinking
 increase in sickness absence and/or turning up late to work.
NOT EVERYONE WILL DISPLAY OBVIOUS SIGNS
"HOW ARE you DOING?"
WELLNESS ACTION PLANS
staff who have experienced mental ill health
• triggers, symptoms and early warning signs
• how mental ill health may impact performance
• what support they need from their manager.

TIPS FOR MANAGERS
TAKE THE LEAD TO TALK
BE POSITIVE AND SUPPORTIVE
Move the conversation to a private space to prevent any disturbanceS
Be open minded and be prepared for the unexpected
Allow the employee as much time as they need and
Think about potential solutions and adjourn the meeting if it is necessary to think through what has been discussed before making a decision.

WHAT IF SOMEONE DOESN'T WANT TO TALK?

OPEN DOOR POLICY
NO PRESSURE
MONITOR
SEEK HELP - HR, OH
CREATING POSITIVE CHANGE
WHAT DOES YOUR ORGANISATION CURRENTLY DO WELL?
10 TIPS
1. Strive to provide the best working conditions
2. Focus on education and communication to reduce fear, stigma and discrimination
3. Create a culture conducive to good mental health
4. Staff consultation
5. Regular appraisals and supervision that benefit both organisations and individual staff members
6. Provide reasonable adjustments
7. Demonstrate leadership at the top
8. Provide the tools and training to support managers in their role
9. Reward achievements
10. Promote healthy lifestyles and access to employee assistance programmes / occupational health

ORGANISATIONAL PLANNING
Full transcript