Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

THE GREAT CHAIN OF BEING

No description
by

Melissa MacDonald

on 15 October 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of THE GREAT CHAIN OF BEING

THE GREAT CHAIN OF BEING
What it is
The Great Chain of Being is the concept that everything is ranked in an order placed by God, from low to high.
The Order of the Chain
Association With the Classical Period
The Classical Period focused on the importance of human beings, and being able to be a beast, man, or rise up and be a philosopher.
The Greeks and Romans started explaining the world through reasoning, changing the previous mythological way of explaining the world.
The people through their own intellect began to stray from their "place" on the "chain of being", and started moving upwards.
The improvement of man and society became a main focus, along with the control over ones own future.
These ideals were revived during the Renaissance.
Influences on Renaissance Writers
Renaissance writers often acknowledged the idea of the Great Chain of Being in their work.
Some writers seemed to disagree with the strictness of the order of the chain, and believed that it was possible to rise to another level.
Some were fascinated by the idea of testing the boundaries of the chain.
The idea of not going beyond one's place influenced many writers to create strong political leaders in their work, such as Shakespeare's Henry V.
Shakespeare used ideas from the Great Chain of Being in his work often.
The order is based on the amount of "spirit" and "matter" an object has.
An object that has more "spirit" and less "matter" is placed higher up in the order.
An object with less "spirit" and more "matter" is placed lower down in the order.
The main order of the chain from low to high goes:
Inanimate objects, rocks, metals, and the four elements (earth, fire, water, and air)
Vegetation
Animals
Humans
Angels
God
Hierarchies of the Chain
Each group contains hierarchies within it.
In the metal group, gold was placed highest because it was thought to have the most spirit of the metals, while lead was placed lower because it was thought to have more matter.
There was considered to be "continuity" between the groups, and some objects blended into lower or higher groups.
For example, shellfish were considered to be animals, however, because they do not move they seem more plant like.
Examples of the Great Chain of Being in literature
Alchemy was based on the belief that lead could be turned into gold by infusing spirit.
Shakespeare's King Lear
Pico Della Mirandola's On the Dignity of Man
The Great Chain of Being says that humans cannot raise up past their spot in the order.
On the Dignity of Man is a piece of literature based on the idea that humans can rise to the level of angels through philosophical contemplation.
Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince
The Prince is a piece of literature that distinguishes the qualities that a prince must have to keep power.
This is related to the idea in the Great Chain of Being that a person in power must remain in power and not let anyone rise above them in order to prevent disorder.
The idea that disorder will be reflected into other realms when it is in one is used in this work.
There is disorder in King Lear's family, which is reflected to his mind, and to nature.
The great storm; disorder of nature
John Locke
Works Cited
"Beyond Search." Search Results Fuzziness : Stephen E. Arnold @. N.p.,
n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2013.
"Droeshout Portrait." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 10 Mar. 2013.
Web. 08 Oct. 2013.
English Department, Brooklyn College. "Introduction to the
Renaissance." Introduction to the Renaissance. Brooklyn College, 30 Mar. 2009. Web. 04 Oct. 2013.
"File:Locke-John-LOC.jpg." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 3 Aug. 2013.
Web. 8 Oct. 2013.
"Fresco Painting: “The School of Philosophy." Fresco Painting: "The
school of Philosophy" -- Kids Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2013.
"Great Chain of Being." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 10 Aug. 2013.
Web. 08 Oct. 2013.
Italian School. The Great Chain of Being. ''Retorica Christiana'' Didacus
Valades, Printed 1579. Web. 05 Oct. 2013.
"King Lear." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 10 Mar. 2013. Web. 08
Oct. 2013.
Marotous, George, and English Faculty Melbourne High School. The
Great Chain of Being. Digital image. Melbourne High School, 14 Feb. 2011. Web. 05 Oct. 2013. <http://resources.mhs.vic.edu.au/macbeth/historical/elizaborder.html>.
"Macbeth L Historical Background L Elizabethan World Order." Macbeth
L Historical Background L Elizabethan World Order. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2013.
"Object Retrieval." Alchemy: Lead into Gold. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 Oct. 2013.
"Pico Della Mirandola Portrait." Pico Della Mirandola Portrait. N.p., n.d.
Web. 08 Oct. 2013.
"The Prince." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 10 Aug. 2013. Web. 08
Oct. 2013.
Full transcript