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The Rose That Grew From Concrete Analysis Presentation

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Valinus Rodgers

on 5 October 2017

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Transcript of The Rose That Grew From Concrete Analysis Presentation

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The Rose That Grew From Concrete by Tupac Shakur
Figurative Language/Symbolism
"Rose..." - symbolizes a person and/or achiever (For example: Tupac)
"Crack..." - symbolizes the small opportunity or chance that one has; most seeds (people) disregard it because of how slim chances are
"...concrete" - symbolizes hardships and/or realistic barriers (For example: the ghetto)
Diction: Vocabulary & Syntax
The diction of the poem consists of its vocabulary and syntax.
Simple Vocabulary & Ordinary Syntax:
author endeavors to make the poem easy to understand so his message can be understood easily and thoroughly, especially for his intended audience (the ghetto).
Tupac Shakur's Life
faced many trials and tribulations
hadn't known father since childhood
mother single parenting two children
had to stay in shelters sometimes
moving from home to home, Shakur's mother became a crack addict, and he became a drug dealer who wrote about his troubles and experiences through poetry.
biography.com: "He began his music career with a cause -- to articulate the travails and injustices endued by African-Americans, often from a male point of view."
Overall Subjects/Themes of the Poem
Perseverance
Grow through the "crack in the concrete"
Persistence
Never give up, no matter what
Optimism
No one believed a Rose could grow from concrete ("nature's law"), but it happened.
Independence
You can prosper alone. The only one that can hinder you is yourself.
Courage
Willing to stand alone and fight through conflicts
Works Cited
“Tupac Shakur.” Edited by Biography.com Editors, Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 8 Sept. 2017, www.biography.com/people/tupac-shakur-206528.
Unknown, Trisha. “Summary and Analysis of The Rose that Grew from the Concrete.” Beaming Notes, 25 Jan. 2014, beamingnotes.com/2014/01/25/summary-analysis-rose-grew-concrete/.
PoetAndPoem.com. “Analysis of The Rose That Grew From Concrete By Tupac Shakur.” Poetandpoem.com, 21 Apr. 2013, www.poetandpoem.com/articles/analysis_of_the_rose_that_grew_from_concrete_by_tupac_shakur/.
Prudchenko, Kate. “Discussing the Diction of a Poem.” The Pen and The Pad, penandthepad.com/discussing-diction-poem-2055.html.
Bradesca, Kathryne. “Why Are Rhythm & Rhyme Important in Poems?” The Pen and The Pad, penandthepad.com/rhythm-rhyme-important-poems-1921.html.
The Rose That Grew From Concrete
Author's Tone
passionate, meaningful, powerful, serious, and individualistic
to encourage his audience that experiences similar difficulties that he has in life to continue to move forward and never to give up on their goals and dreams
aided him in achieving his fame and fortune and getting away from unwanted lifestyle.
Connection
The various conflicts Shakur experienced sparked the themes of his poetry and his writing style.
"The Rose That Grew From Concrete" contains the themes mentioned earlier (perseverance, persistence, etc)
because of the message he attempts to get across to his audience
Meaning/Purpose
No obstacle is too difficult to overcome.
Encouragement/Motivation
Reassurance of recovery from hardships
By Valinus Rodgers
Internal Rhyme Scheme
"Funny it seems, but by keeping its dreams..."
allows ideas to flow
helps to be predictable to reader
contributes to harmony and/or rhythm of poem & to the audience's likings
Full transcript